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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

1975 




"Let the children guard what the sires hove won" 




i»- 



CKECCDSTO'R'D 




Only 33 years after the Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth, a few hardy pioneers settled along the western frontier 
in what would be Chelmsford. By November 22, 1654 enough families had arrived to call the first public meeting 
at William Fletcher's house located near the end of the present Crosby Lane. Six months later (May, 1655) the Town 
of Chelmsford was incorporated along with the neighboring towns of Billerica and Groton, The Rev. John Fiske of 
Wenhatn accepted an invitation to come here with several members of his congregation and, on November 13, 1655, 
the first church in Chelmsford - now the First Parish Church - was organized. In 1820, the sixth minister, the 
Rev. Wilkes Allen, published the first "History of Chelmsford" which is reputed to be "the first town history of the 
dignity of a volume to be printed in this country." The original grant was much larger than the land area included 
within the present town boundaries but, in 1729, the "West Precinct" became the Town of Westford and, in 1826, 
the Town of Lowell was made out of East Chelmsford. Middlesex Village was annexed to Lowell in 1874. Chelmsford 
also gave smaller parcels of land to Tyngsboro, Carlisle, and Littleton. 

In the events leading up to American independence, the citizens of Chelmsford were active participants. 
Chelmsford had its Committee of Correspondence and sent representatives to the Middlesex Convention in Concord 
in August, 1774. One of these delegates, Jonathan Williams Austin, is credited with writing the famous Middlesex 
Resolves. When the alarm was sounded on the morning of April 19, 1775, more than 100 Chelmsford men answered 
the call to arms. One of these minutemen was Benjamin Pierce who later became governor of New Hampshire and 
whose son. Franklin, was the 14th President of the United States. 

Chelmsford has been the home of many other famous men and women. To mention only a few, Elizabeth 
(Clarke) Hancock, grandmother of John Hancock, was the daughter of our second minister; David Henry Thoreau 
lived here as a child and Ralph Waldo Emerson taught at the Chelmsford Classical School. America's first professor 
of physiology, who later served as president of Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, was 
Drf John Call Dalton after whose family Dalton Road was named. Dr. Willard Parker was a world famous surgeon 
who reputedly was the first in America to successfully operate on an abscessed appendix. (Incidently, his great uncle 
was Lt. Col. Moses Parker for whom the Junior High School has been named.) A famous professor of Anatomy at 
Harvard and the first curator of the Peabody Museum was a Chelmsford man. Dr. Jeffries Wyman. His father. 
Dr. Rufus Wyman, gave up his practice here to become the first superintendent of McLean Asylum (now McLean 
Hospital.) 

In the field of education, Chelmsford had the first school for the deaf in which pure oral method was taught 
and one of the pupils was Mabel Hubbard, who later married Alexander Graham Bell. 

Until the beginning of the 20th century, Chelmsford was predominately a farming community. Early industries 
were operated mainly to meet the needs of the inhabitants. However, there were exceptions. Ezekiel Byam was the 
first to manufacture lucifer matches in this country at his factory in South Chelmsford. Local quarries supplied 
"Chelmsford Granite" for the construction of public buildings in Boston, New York, and New Orleans as well as a 
church in Savannah, Georgia. Lime from Chelmsford quarries was used in building many of the early Lowell mills. 

With the incorporation of the Merrimack Manufacturing Company in East Chelmsford in 1822 began the 
development of one of the great textile manufacturing centers of the world. Also worthy of note are the scythe 
factory in West Chelmsford (which became a sword factory and later produced files), the foundry, machine shops, 
and textile mills in North Chelmsford, as well as the Chelmsford Ginger Ale Company in the Center. "Chelmsford 
Glass", on exhibit at the Barrett-Byam House, was made at the Glass Works in Middlesex Village. 

Public transportation before the advent of the railroads was by stagecoach between Boston and Concord, N. H. 
over the Middlesex Turnpike (Turnpike Road) and the Middlesex Canal that connected Chelmsford (Middlesex 
Village) with Boston. Canal Street was the tow path. 



J 




Cover design by Charles Marderosian, 10 Buckman Drive, Chelmsford 



ANNUAL REPORT 

or the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1975 



Printed By.... 



cfMnmuiiinilkm 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated: May, 1655 

Type of Government: Town Meeting 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and Tyngsborough on 

the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle on the South, and West- 
ford on the West. It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 
Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

County: Middlesex 

Land Area: 22.54 Square Miles 

Population, 1970: 31,032 

Density, 1970: 1.394 nersons oer square mile 

Assessed Valuation, 1975: $256,084,1 15 (Real Estate) 

$9,776,300 (Personal Property) 

Tax Rate: $41.00 

United States Senators in Congress: Edward W. Brooke, Newton 

Edward M. Kennedy, Boston 
Representatives in Congress: 

5th Congressional District Paul T. Tsongas, Lowell 

State Senator: 

7th Middlesex District Ronald C. McKenzie, Burlington 

Representative in General Court: 

43rd Middlesex District Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford - Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 

45th Middlesex District Philip L. Shea, Lowell - Precincts 2 & 7 

47th Middlesex District Edward Le Lacheur, Lowell- Precincts 4 & 11 



Accounting Department Monday thru Friday 

Assessors Office Monday thru Friday 

(except Monday Evenings 

(except June, July & August) 
Building Inspector Monday thru Friday 

Thursday 5: 

Board of Health Monday thru Friday 8: 

Highway Department 

Office Monday thru Friday 8: 

Garage : Monday thru Friday 8: 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library Monday thru Friday 10 

Saturdays 10 

MacKay Library Monday thru Friday 2 

Saturdays 2 

School Superintendent Monday thru Friday 8 

Selectmen's Office Monday thru Friday 8 

Town Clerk Monday thru Friday 8 

Monday Evenings 7 

(except June, July & August) 
Tax Collector & Treasurer Monday thru Friday 

Monday Evenings 

(except June, July & August) 
Veterans Agent Monday thru Friday 



7: 



30 a.m. 
30 a.m. 
00 p.m. 

:30 a.m. 
:00 p.m. 
30 a.m. 

30 a.m. 
30 a.m. 

00 a.m. 
00 a.m. 
30 p.m. 
30 p.m. 
00 a.m. 
30 a.m. 
30 a.m. 
00 p.m. 

30 a.m. 
00 p.m. 



5:00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
■8:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 

-9:00 p.m. 
■6:00 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

8:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 



8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



MEETINGS 

First Monday in April 

First Monday in May 

Monday -7:30 P.M. 

Tuesday -8:00 P.M. 

7:30 P.M., 2nd & 4th Wed. every month 

7:30 P.M., 4th Thurs. every month 

8:00 P.M., 1st & 3rd Tues. every month 

7:30 P.M., 2nd Tues. every month 

7:30 P.M., 1st Tues. every month 



12 Precincts 

New High School 

Town Hall 

High School 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

1 Smith Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

DanielJ. Coughlin, Jr. 

(Term expires 1978) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E.St. Hilaire 
(Term expires 1978) 
Board of Selectmen 



Gerald J. Lannan 
Arnold J. Lovering 
William R. Murphy 
Paul C.Hart 
Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 
Philip L. Currier 



Term expired 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



Treasurer & Tax Collector 

Philip J. McCormack 
(Term expires 1978) 

Board of Assessors 
Claude A. Harvey Term expires 1976 

Richard L. Monahan Term expires 1977 

Janet Lombard Term expires 1978 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Arne R. Olson Term expires 1976 

Gerald L. Hardy Term expires 1977 

Arthur J. Colmer Term expires 1978 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 

Richard L. Monahan Term expires 1976 

Roger W. Boyd Term expires 1977 

Robert L. Hughes Term expires 1978 

Claude A. Harvey Term expires 1978 

Ruth K . Delaney Term expires 1980 

Board of Health 

Paul F. McCarthy Term expires 1976 

Paul J. Canniff Term expires 1977 

Peter Dulchinos Term expires 1978 

Nashoba Valley Technical 
Vocational School District 

Louis E.Kelly Term expires 1976 

James M. Harrington Term expires 1977 

Jay M.Knox Term expires 1977 

Stratos Dukakis Term expires 1978 

Park Commissioners 
Ralph E. House Term expires 1976 

J.JoanSchenk Term expires 1977 

Arthur L. Bennett Term expires 1978 



Planning Board 

Timothy J. Hehir 

Thomas A. Ennis (Resigned) 

Peter J.McHughJr. 

Eugene E.Gilet 

Stephen D.Wojcik 

Thomas E. Firth 

A. Robert Raab 

Ann McCarthy 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 



Term expired 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1976 



School Committee 



Jean B. Callahan 
George A. Ripsom 
Robert D. Hall 
William J. Reynolds 
Carol C. Cleven 
Harry A. Foster 



Term expired 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 



Sinking Fund Commissioners 

Francis J . Goode Term expires 1976 

Kenton P. Wells Term expires 1977 

Eustace B.Fiske Term expires 1978 



Sewer Commissioners 



Matthew J. Doyle Jr. 
Joseph M. Gutwein 
Theodore J. Rapallo 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



Trustees of Public Libraries 



James M. Harrington 
Roger P. Welch 
Jean R. Mansfield 
Audrey A. Carragher 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 



Thomas C. Thorstensen ( Resigned) Term expires 1978 
Dr. Howard K. Moore Term expires 1978 



William E.Spence 



Myles Hogan 



Constable 



Tree Warden 



Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1978 



Varney Playground Commissioners 
Elected at Town Meeting 

Robert C. McManimon Term expires 1976 

Henry J. Tucker, Jr. Term expires 1977 

Harry J. Ayotte Term expires 1978 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 
Arnaud R. Blackadar Term expired 1975 

Ernest F. Day Term expires 1976 

Board of Selectmen, Administrative Assistant 

Evelyn M. Haines Term expires 1976 

Town Counsel 

Clement McCarthy Term expires 1976 



Chief of Police 

Robert E. Germann 



Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 



Cemetery Superintendent 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1976 

Park Superintendent 

Donald P. Gray Term expires 1976 

Director of Public Health 

Thomas W. Morris Term expires 1976 

Board of Health Physician 

Benjamin J. Blechman, M. D. Term expires 1976 

Superintendent of Streets 
Louis R. Rondeau Term expires 1976 

Dog Officer 

Frank J. Wojtas Term expires 1976 

Cheryl L. Constantine, Assistant 

Special Constable 

Joseph D. Nyhan 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Martin A . Gruber Term expires 1976 



Building Inspector 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. Term expires 1976 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley Term expires 1976 

Plumbing Inspector Intermittent Plumbing Inspector 

William H. Shedd Richard M. Kelly 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Town Aide & Council on Aging 
Kathleen Robinson 



Assistant Town Clerk 

Mildred C.Kershaw 

Planning Board Clerk 

Nancy D. Maynard 



Assistant Treasurer 

Florence M. Ramsay 

Zoning Appeal Board Clerk 

Velma Munroe 



Veterans' Grave Officer 

George E . Baxendale Term expires 1976 

Wiring Inspector 

Harold M.Tucke, Jr. 

Custodians of Public Buildings 

Robert Sheridan Center Town Hall 

Leroy K. Fielding (Term exp. 1975) Police Station 

Alton L . Dearborn Police Station 

John P. Curran Police Station 



Lowell Drug Treatment-Share 

Donald Butler Edward Fallon 

Adrion Yonge 



Cable Television Advisory Committee 

J . Alan Moy er Robert McAdam 

Richard Arcand F.D. Cavallari 

Harold Kriven ( Resigned) Harold Witt 

John Carson Joseph Bonica 

Robert Brooks Chris Tournas, School Dept. Rep. 

Susan Schleigh, Library Rep. 



Revolutionary War Bicentennial Commission 

George Parkhurst John Alden 

Vincent Kehoe Walter Hedlund 

J. Perry Richardson Robert Geary 

Charles Marderosian Robert Charpentier 

Anna Normand Mary Guaraldi 

Hedwig Zabierek Audrey Carragher 

Janet Lombard Richard Lahue, Sr. 



Youth Center Advisory Committee 



Everett Brown 
Norman Douglas 
Jan Greeno 
Robert Hall 
Melvin Peterson 



Judy Karow 

William Murphy, (Sel. Rep.) 

Brian Sullivan 

Joanne Weisman 

Thomas Dougherty 

Paul Snyder 



Finance Committee 



James Frame 
Donald McGillivray 
Marvin Schenk (Chairman) 
Richard McDermott 
William Edge 
Peter F. Curran 
James Thompson 
Richard Sullivan 



Term expired 1975 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 



Zoning Appeal Board 

Charles Higgins Term expires 1976 

S. Robert Monaco (Chairman) Term expires 1978 

Marshall Arkin Term expires 1977 

Robert Kydd Term expires 1978 

Carolyn Bennett Term expires 1980 



Alternates 



Marguerite Waldron 



Daniel Burke 



Joseph Dappal 



Youth Center Coordinator 

Gary Wolcott 



Ration Board 

Arnold J. Lovering 
Charles Koulas 
Paul McMillan 

Four C's Committee 

Mrs. Alice Gossett 
John Cryan 



Historical 

James J. Wolfgang 
John C. Alden 
Richard Lahue 
Vincent J. R. Kehoe 
Bertha Trubey 
George A. Parkhurst 
Robert C. Spaulding 
John P. Richardson 
Audrey Carragher 



Commission 

Term expired 1975 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 -Resigned 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1977 



Mary McAuliffe 
Lillian Gould 
William Clarke 
Louise Bishop 
Clarence Dane 



Council on Aging 



Christina Ahern 

Edna Nelson 

Kathleen Robinson 

Gula Boyce 

Joan Arcand 



Charlotte Bovill 



Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Peter Dulchinos 

Robert C. McManimon Robert R. Gagnon 

John J. Kenney James S. Kasilowski 

Paul C. Hart (deceased) 

Edmund Polybinski Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

( Chairman ) Ha worth C . Neild 



Chelmsford Historic District Study Commission 

Harold Davis John Alden 

John Balco Charles Watt 

Jane Drury 



Chelmsford Historic District Commission 



Stephen Wojcik 
J. Perry Richardson 
Robert P. LaPorte 
Richard Lahue 
Dr. Paul Canniff 



Harold J. Davis 



Alternates 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 



Charles Watt, Sr. 



Library Needs Committee 

Dr. Howard K. Moore Thomas C. Thorstensen 

Grace W. Pettee ( Resigned) 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy Thomas A. St. Germain 



Memorial Day Committee for the Year 1975 
Harold Woodman 

Stanley Morrison Representatives Post 212 

Carl Reedy 

Elbridge W. Hawes Representatives Post 313 

Joseph Borden 
Timothy F. O'Connor Representatives Post 366 

Fence Viewers 

Reginald Furness, Esq. 
Richard D. Harper 

Veterans' Agent 

Mary McAuliffe 

Director Veterans Services 
William R. Murphy 

Veterans Emergency Fund Committee 

George Archer Thomas Ennis 

Victor Fetro Kenneth Cooke 

James Walker Peter Saulis 

John McNulty Donald House 

George Waite Herbert Knutson 

Alfred Coburn Gerard Vayo 

Personnel Board 

Peter Vennard George Roy, ( Resigned) 

William Hardy David J. McLachlan 



Recreation Commission 

William A. Dempster, Jr. Harry J. Ayotte 

Paul Murphy Robert Charpentier 

Ha worth C . Neild Alfred M . Woods 

Sherburne Appleton 

Director: Donald Babin 

Assistant: Evelyn Newman 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

John Balco Carol Stark 

Thomas Dougherty Denis D. Valdinocci 

John Griffin Morton Farber 

Gerald Silver John MacPhee 

Robert Stallard Gerald Shea 

Jean-Paul J. Gravell 

Industrial Development Commission 



Philip Currier ( Resigned) 
James M. Harrington 
Forest E. Dupee 
Robert Geary 
Lawrence Rice 
James Emanouil 
David McLachlan 
Robert Sayers 
Richard F.Scott 



Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 



Weighers of Merchandise 

George Fournier Peter F. McEnaney 

Ted Magiera John Bomal 

Paul Westwood Leo Gendron 

Charles Hacking Ovila Sirois 

Lillian Cabana Alex Coluchi 

Edward Whitworth George Ingalls 

Francis J. Sakalinski Frederick P. Simpson 

Joseph Bobola 



Environmental Advisory Council 
Steering Committee 
Dr. Ethel Kamiem Dr. Clara M. Refson 

Ina Greenblatt Mary M. Wadman 

Diane Lewis Richard B. Codling 

Sheila Groman Dorothy Stumpf 



Town Tree Department 

Myles Hogan Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

Joan Schenk Christos Alexion 

Louis Rondeau Donald House 

Samuel Parks 

Police Station Addition Committee 

Robert E. Germann Paul V. LaHaise 

Bernard L. George Peter McHugh, Jr. 

John H. Kelly, Jr. 

Town Celebration Committee 

William Fitzpatrick Richard Lahue 

James Gifford Raymond Day 

James Fantozzi Walter Hedlund 

Board of Registrars 

Michael J. Devine Term expires 1976 

Edward H. Hilliard Term expires 1977 

Robert J . Noble Term expires 1978 

Capital Planning & Budgeting Committee 

Eugene Doody Ira S. Parks 

Edward G. Krasnecki John Balco 

Arnaud Blackadar Thomas E. Firth 

Donald McGillivary 

Civil Defense Committee 

George R. Dixon Charles S. Koulas 

Walter R. Hedlund Sgt. Walter Edwards 

Christos Alexion Joseph Staveley 

George J. Brown Frederick Reid (Resigned) 

William W. Edge Melvin deJager 

Conservation Commission 

John Balco Term expires 1976 

Florence Gullion Term expires 1976 

Donald House Term expires 1976 

Robert E. Howe Term expires 1977 

John McCormack Term expires 1977 

Janet Lombard Term expires 1978 

Jane S. McKersie Term expires 1978 

Clerk: Barbara G. Micol 

Community Teamwork 

Arnaud R. Blackadar 

Community Action Advisory Committee 

Rev. Harry A. Foster Francis Wiggin 

Virginia Foster Mary McAuliffe 

JohnCryan Thelma Stallard 

Jane Cryan Kathleen Robinson 

Anne Hadley Arnold J. Lovering 

Committee to Up-Date Town History 

Robert Spaulding Charlotte P. DeWolf 

Charles E. Watt, Sr. Frederick Burne 

Julia Fogg Michael McGrath 

Town Forest Committee 

Martin K. Bovey Kenneth Goggin 

Bruce S. Gullion John Smith 



Kennel Building Committee 

Carl Seidel Charles Feeney 

Frank Wojtas Peter Green 

Dr. Martin Gruber, DVM 

Road Truck Exclusion Sub-Committee 

Robert Hal 1 Joseph B . Hagopian 

Philip L. Currier Leslie Adams 

Robert Germann Gerald J . Lannan 



Tree Committee 



Myles Hogan 
Louis Rondeau 
Christos Alexion 



Thomas Palmer Jr. 
Joan Schenk 
Donald House 



North Middlesex Area Commission 

Philip L. Currier Selectmen's Rep. 

John J. Kenny Alternate 

Chelmsford/Westford Town Line Committee 

William R. Murphy Joseph Giordano 

Claude Harvey 

U. N. Day Chairman 

Charles L. Mitsakos 



Samuel Parks 



East Chelmsford Fire Station Building Committee 

Edward Quinn George Dixon 

Frederick Reid Edward Hoyt 

Walter Hedlund 



Task Force 
Off St. Parking Central Sq. 

Arnold J. Lovering 
Robert Flynn 
Gill Sherman 
Robert Kydd 
Stephen Wojcik 



Route 213 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Marvin Schenk 

Donald House 

Richard Monahan 
Lawrence Rice 



(Continued on page 21 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




(Y^€> I 





BOARD OF SELECTMEN: Front row (1 to r) Chairman Arnold 
J. Lovering, Vice Chairman Paul C. Hart; Back row, Thomas A. 
Palmer, Jr., Philip L. Currier, Clerk William R. Murphy. 



At the Board's Organizational meeting on April 8, 
1975, following the Annual Town Election, Arnold J. 
Lovering was elected as Chairman of the Board. Other 
Board members are Paul C. Hart, Vice Chairman; 
William R. Murphy, Clerk; Thomas A. Palmer, Jr.; 
and Philip L. Currier. Evelyn M. Haines was reap- 
pointed as Administrative Assistant to the Board for 
the ensuing year. 

The success of local government in a democracy 
depends upon an informed citizenry. This annual 
report, covering the activities of the Town for 1975, is 
dedicated to the purpose of better acquainting the 
citizens of Chelmsford with their municipal govern- 
ment. It is intended, in addition, to deal with those 
specific programs and projects undertaken during the 
past year and to explain the organization and functions 
of your Town Government, the responsibilities of its 
various departments, and the underlying principles 
and policies that direct the administration of its af- 
fairs. 



Several developments distinguished Chelmsford's 
Town Government today from what has been 
customary in the past. Because of the greater number 
of issues that now arise, the Selectmen are required to 
cope with such diverse subjects as drainage; 
sidewalks; engineering; traffic and parking functions; 
transportation; vandalism; police/community 
relations; binding arbitration for police officers and 
firefighters; implementation of the State Building 
Code; solid waste disposal; and Community Block 
Grants. 

In order to deal constructively and effectively with 
the challenges posed, several significant changes in 
the Board's operations occurred in 1975: 

Development of Selectmen's Open List of Projects 
and Priority Classification 

It was agreed that programs and projects to be 
accorded priority status by the Board would be 
scheduled on weekly agendas for consideration in 



order to permit development of full supporting in- 
formation and data. There had been a general feeling 
that the Selectmen had been involved in "reacting to 
crisis" at the expense of planning appropriate future 
projects for study, consideration, and eventual 
decision. By adopting the open list of projects, the 
Board, it was felt, would be better able to prepare for 
possible beneficial changes in all phases of Town Af- 
fairs. 

The following are some of the thirteen proposals 
which were discussed and implemented by the Board 
during this year: 

Developed and mailed to residents a list of all 
open projects which required that priorities be 
established - the response from this mailing was 
very poor; however, it is the hope of the Select- 
men to prepare a more informative list in the 
future which would result in more citizen par- 
ticipation. 

The Board reviewed all appointed committees to 
determine need for continued existence. During 
the appointment process, the Board voted to 
dissolve many committees as the committees 
had fulfilled their specific purpose. 

The Board prepared and adopted a job 
description and responsibilities for the Ad- 
ministrative Assistant's position. 

The Board has discussed and referred to the 
Home Rule Advisory Committee for study, the 
need of a Town Manager. 

The Board established that between the hour of 
7:00 PM - 7:30 PM on Mondays, they would be 
available to meet with residents to discuss any 
matters residents feel should be brought to the 
attention of the Board. 

Also, on a quarterly basis, the Selectmen con- 
duct their regular meetings in a different 
geographical section of Town. 

The Board continues an active role through 
membership and involvement in the Merrimack 
Valley Selectmen's Association, Massachusetts 
Selectmen's Association, the Massachusetts 
League of Cities and Towns, and the Middlesex 
County Advisory Board. 

The Board developed and adopted a com- 
prehensive hiring policy for all Departments 
under the Selectmen's jurisdiction. 

The Board reinstituted periodic department 
meetings to improve communications. 

The Board conducted an in-depth work session 
with Town Counsel to assess status and progress 
of all matters currently in litigation in the 
Courts. 

As the licensing authority, the Board held its annual 
hearings on the issuance of various licenses and also 
reviewed licenses which come under their jurisdiction. 
This year the Board conducted an in-depth survey of 
license fees throughout fifty-four cities and towns in 
Middlesex County. In accordance with State Statutes, 
the Board increased some license fees, i.e., Common 
Victualler Licenses, All Alcoholic Club Licenses, and 
Wine & Malt Restaurant Licenses. 



In view of the fact that last year there was very little 
response to a public auction for the disposal of Town- 
owned equipment, the Board, this year, requested 
sealed bids for Town-owned and obsolete equipment, 
which proved to be more fruitful. 

Chapter 646 of Acts of 1975 was signed in law by 
Governor Dukakis on October 16, 1975 which 
established the true boundary line between the Towns 
of Chelmsford and Westford. 

The School Committee turned over to the Town 
through the Board, the East School and Quessy School. 
The Selectmen accepted formal proposals from 
various organizations and evaluated all proposals. 
After careful deliberations, the Board released the 
East School to the Recreation Commission, and the 
Quessy School to the Youth Center. The Board has also 
acquired through Town Meeting action the Emerson 
Property, land and buildings, located at 11 North Road 
which contains 3.211 acres of land. The property is to be 
used for municipal purposes. The Board has 
established Emerson Property Development Com- 
mittee which will be composed of seven members who 
will implement the short and long range tasks ap- 
proved by the Board. 

The Board has conducted public hearings on the 
traffic control improvements in the Central Square 
Area which met much opposition from the merchants 
in the Square due to the proposed loss of parking 
spaces. As a result, the Selectmen appointed a sub- 
committee to review funding for the overall plan, 
redesign and redevelopment of the Central Square 
area. 

The Board accepted bids and awarded the Contract 
for the Restoration of Crystal Lake to M. De Matteo 
Construction Company in the amount of $644,833. The 
State Flood Relief Board has voted to reimburse the 
Town in the amount of $610,833. They excluded reim- 
bursement for the inlet and outlet control structure in 
the total amount of $34,000. which will have to be paid 
by the Town. Construction will commence as soon as 
weather permits. 

The Selectmen have again this year adopted specific 
policies pertaining to the signing of weekly warrants; 
use of Town Counsel, flying of Flags; temporary 
inability to fulfill duties; single bids; employment of 
School Department Retirees; disposal of surplus Town 
equipment; distribution of Commissions derived from 
package policy covering Town properties; Public Bus 
Transportation; unsigned letters; and the issuance of 
Town Keys. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee 
have mutually adopted a communication procedure 
which establishes procedures for warrant articles; 
Special Town Meetings; Annual Town Meetings; and 
transfers from the reserve fund. 

With the retirement of Arnaud R. Blackadar, Town 
Accountant, the Board advertised and received over 
one hundred applications for this position. At the 
conclusion of interviews the Board appointed Ernest F. 
Day as Town Accountant. 



The Town was the recipient of the Kenneth E. Picard 
Innovation Award (Mass. League of Cities and Towns) 
for its Selectmen's Procedures; Appointed Committee 
Handbook and the Correspondence Summary. 



Mr. Donald Gray, Park Superintendent, was 
nominated by Town Employees and chosen by the 
Board of Selectmen as the Outstanding Municipal 
Employee and received an award from the Mass. 
League of Cities and Towns. 



To all who have offered and given their time and 
talents in the service of the Town, we express our 
sincere thanks. In the true spirit of our community, let 
us all continue to "GUARD WHAT THE SIRES HAVE 
WON." 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Mildred C. Kershaw, Ass't Town Clerk 

LICENSES AND VITAL RECORDS 



Sporting 
Licenses 




Dog 
Licenses 


Kennel 
Licenses 


Marriage 
Intentions 


Recorded 
Mortgages, Etc 


1673 




2557 


11 


253 


456 


Births 

(Incomplete) 

324 




Marriages 
301 




Deaths 
246 



1975 JURORS DRAWN 



Following names were drawn 
from the 74-75 list. 



30 

26 
57 
29 
1 
33 
42 
27 
41 
56 
39 
22 
73 
34 
48 
51 
70 
72 
50 
43 
71 
81 
54 
32 
64 
66 
78 



1/6/75 
1/30/75 
1/30/75 
1/30/75 
1/30/75 
1/30/75 
3/3/75 
3/3/75 
3/3/75 
3/3/75 
3/20/75 
3/20/75 
3/20/75 
3/20/75 
4/18/75 
4/18/75 
4/18/75 
4/18/75 
4/28/75 
5/20/75 
5/20/75 
6/9/75 
6/9/75 
7/17/75 
7/17/75 
7/17/75 
7/17/75 



Following 


names 


were drawn 


from the 75-76 list. 




25 




8/18/75 


10 




8/18/75 


115 




8/18/75 


53 




8/18/75 


45 




9/25/75 


19 




9/25/75 


106 




9/25/75 


68 




9/25/75 


35 




10/20/75 


44 




10/20/75 


103 




10/20/75 


100 




10/20/75 


15 




11/24/75 


114 




11/24/75 


22 




11/24/75 


72 




11/24/75 


88 




12/23/75 


13 




12/23/75 


33 




12/23/75 



1974-1975 JURY LIST 



Name and Address 



Occupation 



1. DERRIN M. ALBERGHENE, 12 Carleton Avenue 

2. JAMES F. ARMITAGE, 135 Dunstable Road 

3. DORILDA M. BARBER, 127 Hunt Road 

4. ALBERT A. BARROWS, JR., 7 Bowl Road 

5. BRUCE P. BELANGER, 144 Westford Street 



Machinist-Engineering Department Model Make 

Boilermaker- Welder 

Beauty Shop Owner & Hairdresser 

Unemployed/Part-Time Tennis Instructor 

Potter 



Name and Address 

6. ROGER A. BLOMGREN, 24 Dunshire Drive 

7. VERNON L. BURTON, 23 Stearns Street 

8. JOHN CARDULLO, 60 Pine Hill Road 

9. ROBERT A. CHASE, 67 Riverneck Road 

10. BELLA T. CLARKE, 6 Clarke Avenue 

11. JOHN T. COONEY, 8 Arbutus Avenue 

12. PAUL G. CRETE, 14 Reid Road 

13. DAVID F. CURRIER, 4 Cliff Road 

14. NORMA J. DAVISON, 9 Cypress Street 

15. ANTHONY J. DENARO, 8 Schofield Road 

16. RICHARD D. DEVNO, 14 Blodgett Park 

17. WILLIAM H. DOMEY, 14 Sherman Street 

18. FRANCIS J. DUNLAVEY, 33 Groton Road 

19. KENNETH A. DUVAL, 28 Charlemont Court 

20. FRANKLYN R. FADER, 217 Main Street 

21. V. SCOTT FOLLANSBEE, 3 Fuller Road 

22. RICHARD J. FREITAS, 10 Arbor Road 

23. ALLAN F. GAGE, 27 Cathy Road 

24. JOSEPHS. GAUDETTE, JR., 12 Cove Street 

25. CHARLES GEORGE, 12 Dawn Drive 

26. DOROTHY E. GIBSON, 12 Gregory Road 

27. JOHN W. A. GILMAN, 3 Pennock Road 

28. PAULETTE L. GROUT, 105 Richardson Road 

29. GLADYS E. HABERMAN, 4 Susan Avenue 

30. JOHN F. HAYES, 3 Churchill Road 

31. ROBERT E. HEROUX, 18 Dennison Road 

32. RALF M. HOEHN, 36 Berkeley Drive 

33. GERRY HOYE, 17 Dunstan Road 

34. BARBARA G. HUNTLEY, Sinai Circle, Kennelworth Apts. 

35. ANTHONY J. KAMINSKI, JR., 114 Meadowbrook Road 

36. ALEXANDER R. KEENAN, 11 Lakeside Avenue 

37. JOHN R. KELLY, 5 Amble Road 

38. EDWARD L. KERSHAW, 74 Old Stage Road 

39. PATRICIA S. KNAPP, 67 Pine Hill Road 

40. RALPH A. KOKOSKA, 30 Arbor Road 

41. BARBARA M. LANGWORTHY, 14 Pracing Road 

42. RICHARD J. LATULIPPE, 2 Meehan Drive 

43. EARL R. LEACH, 4 Pecos Circle 

44. GEORGE F. LEVASSEUR, 21 Varney Avenue 

45. RAYMOND A. LINDSAY, 27 Old Stage Road 

46. MARGARET F. LYNCH, 13 Galloway Road 

47. JOHN MacPHEE. 14 Pendleton Road 

48. LEE ANN MANSEAU, 70 Boston Road, Apt. H120 

49. WARREN EDGAR MARR, 23 Galloway Road 

50. GARY B. MAUSER, 3 Baldwin Road 

51. HELENE E. McCUE, 17 Sunset Avenue 

52. JAMES ROBERT McGINN, 8 Hidden Way 

53. HELEN M. MERRILL, 285 Chelmsford Street 

54. CHARLES E. MORGAN, 51 Manning Road 

55. JAMES E. MULLIN, 5 Howard Road 

56. PHILIP D. MURPHY, 89 Park Road 

57. WILLIAM A. NORDSTROM, JR., 15 Mcintosh Road 

58. HELEN L. O'BRIEN, 8 Temi Road 

59. JOHN O'GRADY, 14 Green Valley Drive 

60. STINA ALICE OLSON, 8 Gary Road 

61. PAUL B. O'SULLIVAN, 17 Clover Hill Drive 

62. HENRY J. PARK, 27 Horseshoe Road 

63. RUTH J. PELOQUIN, 63 Amble Road 

64. DAVID B. POLLOCK, 5 Nevada Drive 

65. TERESA RICHARDSON, 281 Mill Road 

66. JOSEPH P. RIVARD, 7 Bentley Lane 

67. KENNETH A. ROY, 3 Woodhead Road 

68. LORRAINE M. RYAN, 14 Dennison Road 

69. WALTER R. SKERRY, 6 Brush Hill Road 

70. IGNATIUS G. SIMARD, 80 Riverneck Road 

71 . EDITH ST. CYR, 34 Beech Street 

72. RONALD J. STANTON, 270 Littleton Road 

73. WILLIAM J. SWEENEY, 33 Longmeadow Road 

74. PAUL V. THOMAS, 30 Ansie Road 

75. DOROTHY M. TILTON, 11 C Street 

76. ARMAND A. TRAHAN, 10 Draycoach Drive 

77. ALAN E. TUCKER, 8 Cathy Road 



Occupation 

Division Staff Accountant 

Framing Contractor, Pres. & Tres. own company 

Regional Sales Manager, Computer Services 

Machinist 

Assembler 

Computer Systems Manager 

Electronics Engineer 

Investment Consultant 

Assembler 

Instrument Maker 

Circuit Board Drill Leader 

Retired 

Plumber 

Electro-Optical Engineer 

Supermarket Manager 

R.E. Builder & Booker/Self-Employed 

Builder/Self -Employed 

Packaging & Material Buyer 

Civil Engineer 

Carpenter 

Part-Time Billing Clerk 

Director of Mail Order and Advertising 

Unemployed 

Ass't. to V.P. of Insurance Company 

Materials Engineer 

Plumbing Foreman 

Marketing Manager 

Bookkeeper 

Assistant Dean of Administration 

Mechanic 

Project Control on Circuit Boards 

Salesman 

Director of Field Services 

Housewife 

Production Control Specialist 

Housewife 

Manager of Financial Planning 

Test Design Development Engineer 

Painter 

Sales Manager 

Housewife 

Manufacturing Engineering Supervisor 

Executive Secretary to V.P. 

Safety Inspector, Mechanic 

Design Engineer 

Clerk 

Senior Financial Analyst 

Housewife 

Tuber 

Electronics Engineering Aide 

Program Manager 

Services Office Machines 

Proofreader 

Manufacturer's Representative 

At Home 

Electrical Engineer 

Radar Systems Engineer 

Plant Clerk 

Electrical Engineer 

Executive Secretary 

President of Trucking Company 

Industrial Engineering Manager 

Housewife 

Technical Supervisor 

Foreman 

Office Manager 

Lab Technician 

Computer Maintenance Technician 

Mechanical Engineer 

Switchboard Operator 

Electrical Engineer 

Computer Repair 



Name and Address 



Occupation 



78. RONALD UBERTI, 207 Concord Road 

79. RITA C. VINES, 232 Princeton Street 

80. STEPHEN J. WALL, 26 Firth Lane 

81. LILLIAN A. WASS, 7 Garrison Road 

82. ERNEST R. WOESSNER, JR., 31 Westland Avenue 

83. JAMES L. WOOSTER, JR., 169 Boston Road 

84. JOHN M. ZEMAITIS, JR., 14 Pleasant St. 

85. LARRY G. B. YEE, 157 Westford Street 



Computer Programmer 

Housewife 

Owner - T.V. Sales & Repair 

Housewife 

Store Detective 

Assistant Manager of Liquor Store 

Department Manager 

Lab Technician 



1975-1976 JURY LIST 



Name and Address 

1. FRED ADAMS, Sinai Circle 

2. RAMON ARRUDA, 9 Prairie Road 

3. ROBERT P. BELANGER, 83 Dunstable Road 

4. DORTOHY G. BORROWS, 62 Hornbeam Hill Rd. 

5. ROGER BURKE, 21 Dunstable Road 

6. FRANCES F. CAMPBELL, 55 Locke Road 

7. EDWARD D. CIAMPA, 26 Marinel Avenue 

8. ROLAND J. CONWAY, 30 Mcintosh Road 

9. DAVID J. CUNHA, 144 Littleton Road 

10. ALBERT J. ALLARD, 31 Overlook Drive 

11. JOHN J. AVILA, JR., 15 Gay Street 

12. MICHELLE BENNETT, 25 Cathy Road 

13. JAMES L. BROWN, 16 Essex Place 

14. ARTHUR I. BUTLER, 8 Lantern Lane 

15. ANTHONY P. CELLINI, 249 Graniteville Road 

16. NANCY P. CLARK, 54 Westford Street 

17. PAUL L. COSTANTINO, 23 Charlemont Court 

18. MARY E. CUSHING, 188 Mill Road 

19. FLORENCE M. ANDERSON, 7 Sierra Drive 

20. EDWARD BARCUS, 10 Chestnut Hill Road 

21. KENNETH W. BOCZAR, 11 Kiberd Drive 

22. JOSEPH W. BUCCERI, 2 Johnson Road 

23. MARY F. CAIN, 40 Graniteville Road 

24. LEON A. CHASE, 1 Main Street 

25. CAROL A. COLBOURNE, 31 Algonquin Street 

26. CHERYL L. DAPPAL, 8 Topeka Road 

27. ANTHONY J. DeCAROLIS, 17 Overlook Road 

28. JOHN P. DiROCCO, 17 Marose Avenue 

29. RICHARD T. DRONSEIKO, 19 Hitchinpost Road 

30. HARRIETTE FARRINGTON, 34 Dalton Road 

31. JAMES J. FOX, JR., 142 Boston Road 

32. JOSEPH A. GEOFFREY, 106 Wightman Street 

33. JOSEPH J. GRAVELLE, 34 North Road 

34. DAVID F. HADLEY, 64 School Street 

35. ROBERT L. HARMON, JR., 53 Warren Avenue 

36. CATHERINE HILL, 14 Carriage Drive 

37. EDWARD I. DEIBERG, 134 Boston Road 

38. ROBERT E. DONALDSON, JR., 29 Warren Avenue 

39. CECELIA FERREIRA, 39 Marshall Street 

40. ANN M. FRENCH, 9 Jensen Avenue 

41. BARRY M. GILMAN, 21 Thomas Drive 

42. MARION H. GREENWOOD, 2 Juniper Street 

43. RICHARD A. HALLION, 22 Sleigh Road 

44. CATHERINE HEHIR, 25 Church Street 

45. CHARLES P. HOEFFLER, 21 Charlemont Court 

46. PATRICIA A. DeYOUNG, 36 Miland Avenue 

47. JAMES T. DOSSETT, 14 Lantern Lane 

48. ROBERT R. EGAN, 221 Mill Road 

49. ANNE M. FLEMING, 1 Manor Circle 

50. ALLAN T. GALPIN, JR., 70 Davis Road 

51. BARBARA D. GOGGIN, 38 Janet Road 

52. J. W. GROVE, 7 Buckman Drive 

53. MARTIN J. HANNON, 20 Carriage Drive 

54. SAMUEL T. HERRICK, Jr. , 21 Marina Road 



Occupation 

Tester 

Sales Manager 

Dir. of Food Service 

Manager 

Driver 

Housewife 

Testman 

Director of Advertising 

Owner-Manager 

V.P. and Sales Manager 

Truck Driver 

Cashier 

Group Leader 

Design Analyst 

Foreman 

Housewife 

Senior Accountant 

Receptionist 

Housewife - Part-Time Piano Teacher 

Silk Screener 

Truck Maintenance Sup't. 

Engineer 

Homemaker 

Retired 

Unemployed 

Teacher 

V.P. -Sales Manager 

Repair Technician 

Design Engineer 

Bookkeeper 

Secretary 

Machine Technician 

Self Employed General Contractor 

Service Technician 

Material Control 

Cook 

Cabinet Maker 

Truck Driver 

Lab. Technician 

At Home 

Director of Material Services 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Assembler 

Bank Manager 

Housewife 

Manufacturing Manager 

Education Consultant 

Student 

Senior Staff Analyst 

Legal Secretary 

Product Manager 

Technician 

Sales Executive 



Name and Address 



Occupation 



55. EDWARD P. HOPEY, 70 Hunt Road 

56. HUGH F. KEANEY, 81 Dalton Road 

57. EUGENE S. KILLMON, JR., 6 Comanche Circle 

58. JOHN S. LACHUT, 14 Sherman Street 

59. JULIA ELIZABETH LEWIS, 12 Longview Drive 

60. ALBERT A. MARCHAND, 14 Manahan Street 

61. JOHN E. McMANUS, 11 Hitchinpost Road 

62. RUTH D. MERRILL, 75 North Road 

63. EVA A. MORIN, 143 High Street 

64. ROBERT E. OSBORNE, 20 Russell Road 

65. THOMAS J. PELLETIER, 10 Pilgrim Road 

66. MARION R. KELLEY, 24 Bridge Street 

67. ERNEST G. KISLEY, 19 Chestnut Hill Road 

68. JOSEPH T. LAMOUREUX, 5 Edgewood Street 

69. BEVERLY A. MACKEY, 4 Wiede Street 

70. JOSEPH T. MAYHAN, SR., 9 Green Valley Drive 

71 . WILLI AM J . MCCARTHY , 180 Tyngsboro Road 

72. CHARLES E. MILLER, 21 Johnathan Lane 

73. BRENDEN G. MUNGOVAN, 61 Church Street 

74. REGINALD J. PALASKI, 11 Dennison Road 

75. JOHN T. PIERCE, 50 Hall Road 

76. EDWIN KENNERLY, 4 Woodhead Road 

77. J. C. KRAMER, 27 Sandra Drive 

78. HARRY M. LEONARD, JR., 9 Brush Hill Road 

79. JOHN MAGNUSON, 289 Acton Road 

80. JOHN T. MCCARTHY, 4 Starlight Avenue 

81. MARTY K. McLAIN, 310 Old Westford Road 

82. CAROLYN A. MOODY, 23 Billerica Road 

83. STELLA OCZKOWSKI, 274 Billerica Road 

84. DUNCAN PATRIQUIN, 10 Clarissa Road 

85. EVERETT A. PORTEOUS, 270 Littleton Road 

86. ROBERT D. PRESCOTT, 43 Highland Avenue 

87. DORIS L. REIMER, 13 Abbott Lane 

88. JOHN H. ROSS, 10 Kiberd Drive 

89. FRED W. SCHRIM, 5 Sandra Drive 

90. OLIVER C. SHELDON, 43 Clarissa Road 

91. LORRAINE M. STAUFFER, 17 Pleasant Street 

92. MURIEL SWEET, 47 Dunstable Road 

93. THOMAS J. TEVLIN, 10 Bartlett Street 

94. LUISE WADSWORTH, 279 Mill Road 

95. JOANNE L. WILSON, 8 Amherst Street 

96. ELIZABETH K. PUROL, 18 Samuel Road 

97. FELIX ROBERTS, 14 Bishop Street 

98. BEATRICE F. RUSSELL, 216 Graniteville Road 

99. PAUL C. SCRIBNER, 14 Brentwood Road 

100. EILEEN M. SIMPSON, 57 Main Street 

101. PAUL A. STUART, 39 Berkeley Drive 

102. JANICE T. SWIDERSKI, 39 Abbott Lane 

103. NORMAN TREMBLAY, 60 Gay Street 

104. DOROTHY WERLICH, 39 Old Stage Road 

105. MARCY R. YURICK, 270 Littleton Road 

106. MAURICE RACETTE, 250 Dunstable Road 

107. ELIZABETH L. ROESSLER, 3 Raymond Road 

108. JAMES W. SAULNIER, JR., 17 Regina Drive 

109. THEODORE G. SHAMP, 35 Longmeadow Road 

110. WAYNE R. ST. ONGE, 58 High Street 

111. RICHARD J. SULLIVAN, 29 Sleigh Road 

112. FRANKLIN W. TAYLOR, 20 Sharon Avenue 

113. JOAN TURK, 9 Chelmsford Street 

114. DAVID R. WILCOX, 205 Graniteville Road 

115. BARBARA J. ENGEL, 305 Acton Road 



Computer Mfg. 

Social Worker 

Project Manager 

Unemployed 

Student 

Custodian 

Personnel Director 

At Home 

Unemployed 

Meat Cutter 

Student 

Manager 

Supervisor 

Machine Operator 

Housewife 

Manager 

Engineer 

Consultant 

Mfg. Test Technician 

Store Owner 

Tech. Staff 

Project Engineer 

Manager 

Accountant 

Unemployed 

Student 

Supervisor 

Horticulturist 

Warehouseman 

Laborer 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Student 

Machinist 

Engineer 

At Home 

Bank Teller 

Manager 

Administrator 

Nurses Aid 

Housewife 

Foreman 

At Home 

Salesman 

Animal Breeder 

Project Manager 

Housewife 

Driver/Counterman 

Sales Representative 

Keypunch Operator 

Clerk 

Assistant Director 

Contractor/General Manager 

Senior Engineer 

Letter Carrier 

Self Employed/Sales 

Manager 

Accountant 
Social Worker 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 7. 1975 and MAY 5, 1975 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 . McFarlin School - All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Junior High School (West) Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 
Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 11. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House — Old Westford Road 



On Monday, the seventh day of April, 1975, being the 
first Monday in said month, at 8:00 A.M., for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

One Moderator for three years 

One Town Clerk for three years 

One Selectman for three years 

One Treasurer and Tax Collector for three years 

One Assessor for three years 

One Tree Warden for three years 

One member of Board of Health for three years 

Two members of the School Committee for three years 

One member of Nashoba Valley Technical High School 

District Committee for three years 
One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
One Park Commissioner for three years 
One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years 
Two Trustees for the Public Library for three years 
One member of the Planning Board for five years 
One Sewer Commissioner for three years 
One Housing Authority Member for five years 

And to vote upon the following question: 

Question : 

Shall licenses be granted in this town for the 
operation, holding or conducting a game commonly 
called beano? 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M., 
and to meet in the Chelmsford High School Gym- 
nasium on Monday, the fifth day of May, 1975 at 7:30 
P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon 
the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to further 
amend Sub-Paragraph 3 (Moth Superintendent) of 
Paragraph B (Conservation and Cemetery) of Section 
24, subtitled, "Job Titles and Standard Rates for 
Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary 
Bylaw", by deleting therefrom the position of Moth 
Superintendent and inserting in its stead the position of 
Superintendent of Pest Control: and further vote to 
amend the first sentence of the last paragraph of said 
Section 11 of said Bylaws by deleting therefrom the 
words, "December 21st of each year" and substituting 
therefor the words, "the first Monday in April each 
year"; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2A. To see if the Town will vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage 
and Salary Bylaw", to conform to rates of pay 
negotiated by the Town with certain labor 
organizations, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 149, 
Section 178 G through 178 N: 



RECOMMENDED 



A. ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 



1. Veterans' Agent $ 8,500.00 p. a. $* 

2. Clerk, Senior 7,431 .00 p. a. $* 

3. Clerk 5,923.00 p.a. $ * 

4. Town Accountant 14,000.00 p.a. $* 

5. Assistant Treasurer 1.00 p.a. $* 

6. Town Counsel 500.00 p.a. $* 

7. Selectmen's Administrative 

Assistant 10,000.00 p.a. $* 

8. Personnel Board's 

Recording Clerk 3.00 hr. $ * 

9. Board of Registrar's Clerk . 850.00 p.a. $ * 

10. Clerk 3.00 hr. $* 

11. Planning Board Clerk 3.00 hr. $* 

12. Board of Registrars, three 

members 360.00 ea. $ " 

13. Town Aide 7,560.00 p.a. $* 



B. CONSERVATION AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent. $1 1 ,466.00 p.a. $* 

2. Cemetery Foreman 4.38 hr. $ * 

3. Superintendent of Insect 

and Pest Control 1.00 p.a. $' 

4. Landscaper 3.92 hr. $ ' 

5. Laborer, Park and 

Cemetery 3.58 hr. $ ' 

6. Unskilled laborer 2.21 hr. $' 

7. Park Superintendent 1 1 ,466.00 p.a. $' 

8. Skilled Forest Workman .. 2.93 hr. $' 

9. Cemetery Equipment 

Operator 423 hr - $ 



. CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian (Center Hall). . . $ 3.31 hr. 

2. Custodian (Library) 3.31 hr. 

3. Custodian (Police 

Department) 3.31 hr. 

4. Custodian (Fire 

Department) 3.31 hr. 



1. Librarian MLS $ 13,456.00 p.a. $' 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant).. 9,500.00 pa. $' 

3. Branch Librarian 8,005.00 p.a. $' 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian . 3.32 hr. $' 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian . 2.84 hr. $' 

6. Clerk 3.00 hr. $' 

7. Aides 2.21 hr. $* 



CURRENT RECOMMENDED 

1974-75 Fiscal 

E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT * July 1,1975 

1. Highway Superintendent. .$ 18,000.00 p. a. $** 

2. Highway Foreman 5.80 hr. $** 

* The remaining classifications in this department are 
subject to collective bargaining 

F. RECREATION 

1 . Director $ 0.00 $ ** 

Transportation 250.00 p. a. $** 

1 A. Administrative Assistant 

to Recreation Commission 1,200.00 pa. $** 
IB Director of Summer 

Program 1 ,240.00 p. a. $ ** 

MIN MAX 

2. Swimming Director $ 70.00 wk. 90.00 wk. 

3. Swimming Instructor 70.00 wk. 90.00 wk. 

4. Playground Director 70.00 wk. 90.00 wk. 

5. Playground Supervisor 70.00 wk. 90.00 wk. 

6. Playground Instructor 70.00 wk. 90.00 wk. 

7. Sports Instructor 70.00 wk. 90.00 wk. 

G. MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Animal Inspector $ 1 ,000.00 p. a. $** 

2. Building Inspector 15,000.00 p. a. $ ** 

3. Gas Inspector 4.00 visit $ ** 

4. Electric Inspector 4.00 visit $** 

5. Sealer of Weights 

& Measures 2,000.00 p. a. $ ** 

6. Dog Officer 6,500.00 pa. $** 

6a. Assistant Dog Officer 5,200.00 p. a. $ ** 

7. ClockWinder 100.00 p. a. $** 

** The rates set forth for the above departments are 
the current 1974-75 rates and as negotiations are 
continuing these rates will be amended at the Town 
Meeting: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 
1975 to June 30, 1976 : or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in an- 
ticipation of the revenue of the financial year begin- 
ning July 1, 1975, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17: or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to request 
the Department of Corporations and Taxation, 
Division of Accounts of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to make an audit of all accounts in all 
departments in the Town of Chelmsford: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Treasurer 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money with which to meet 
bills for previous years: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the filing of a Petition in the General Court under the 
provisions of Section 8 of Article 89 of the Amendments 
to the Constitution for an act: enabling the Town to pay 
the sum of $1,875.00 to John Gurich of Chelmsford for 
construction of 8' wide steel reinforced concrete steps 
constructed at the Robert's property in September, 
1974. Said steps having been completed as part of the 
Recreation Commission's development of the Robert's 
property as a recreational facility for the community: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
Recreation Commission 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to discon- 
tinue the following described town way in accordance 
with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 82, Section 
21, which way is located on the northerly side of Main 
Street, opposite Meadowbrook Road, bounded and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at a stone bound at a southwesterly point 
of land, now or formerly of Malvina M. Arpin: 

Northwesterly by land of Arpin, two hundred thirty- 
seven and 05/100 (237.05) feet to a 
Massachusetts Highway bound: 

Northeasterly to Main Street one hundred fifty 
(150) feet, more or less: 

Southeasterly along the northerly side of Main 
Street two hundred fifty-two (252) 
feet, more or less, 

Southwesterly seventy (70) feet, more or less, to the 
point of beginning. 

Containing approximately one-half (1/2) acre, more 
or less, and being the remaining portion of land owned 
by the Town as a result of the relocation of Main Street 
and a taking by eminent domain as shown on Assessors 
Map at Plat Number 195; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the erection of signs within housing 
developments indicating the way out of the develop- 
ments to main thoroughfares: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to grant 
longevity benefits to all permanent employees of the 
Highway Department in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

a. Upon completion of five years of employment said 
employee shall receive a three per cent (3%) increase. 

b. Upon completion of ten years of employment said 
employee shall receive a six per cent (6%) increase. 

c. Upon completion of fifteen years of employment 
said employee shall receive a nine percent (9%) in- 
crease. 



d. Upon completion of twenty years of employment 
said employee shall receive a twelve per cent (12%) 
increase. : 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the installation of new gasoline tanks 
and vaulting of new and existing tanks at the Highway 
Garage: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to participate and 
file an application for funds under the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee 
simple for a certain sum of money to be transferred 
from available funds or raised by appropriation, the 
land and buildings of the estate of the late Theodore W. 
Emerson located at 11 North Road in the town for 
municipal purposes: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote in ac- 
cordance with the recommendations contained in the 
Weston & Sampson engineering report dated 
February, 1975 to authorize the Water District Con- 
solidation Committee to proceed with the necessary 
steps to consolidate those Water Districts within the 
Town which vote at their next annual or special Water 
District meeting to become part of a larger municipal 
water system: or act in relation thereto. 

Water District Consolidation Committee 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Water District Consolidation Committee 
to obtain the necessary legal, financial and accounting 
services and incur other necessary expenses for a 
study to determine how best to establish a municipal 
water system: or act in relation thereto. 

Water District Consolidation Committee 

ARTICLE 16. In the event of an affirmative vote on 
the foregoing article, to see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds 
a certain sum of money for such purposes: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Water District Consolidation Committee 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize and direct the Water District Consolidation 
Committee to draft proposed legislation consolidating 
the Water Districts, which proposals are to be 
presented for approval at the next Annual Town 
Meeting or any Special Town Meeting prior to the next 
Annual Town Meeting: or act in relation thereto. 

Water District Consolidation Committee 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning Bylaw now in force and effect 
by substituting or amending and substituting the 
proposed Zoning Bylaw and Zoning Map which were 
prepared by the Chelmsford Planning Board and dated 
April, 1975 as filed in the office of the Town Clerk on 
which a public hearing was held at 8:00 P.M., April 16, 
1975, notice of which was advertised in the Chelmsford 
Newsweekly as required by law: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $300,672.59, or some other sum 
of money to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the town's 
share of the pension, expense, and military service 
funds: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $200,000.00, or some other sum 
of money, to be used as a Reserve Fund at the 
discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum 
of $49,979.00 for Chapter 90 construction: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to dispose of 
equipment presently being used by the Highway 
Department as follows: 

a. To purchase one truck chassis (for waste 
collections) for the Highway Department and to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one waste collection 
truck presently being used by the Highway Depart- 
ment. 

b. To purchase one packer body (for waste collec- 
tions) for the Highway Department. 

c. To purchase two dump trucks for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale two dump trucks presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

d. To purchase one Roller for the Highway Depart- 
ment. 

e. To purchase one trailer for the Highway Depart- 
ment: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase and/or construction of 
a Salt Storage Shed for the Highway Department, said 
Shed to be located on the premises of the Highway 
Garage: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to expend funds in 
the amount of $114,512.00 for various projects in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of Chapter 1140 Acts of 
1973, Section 20: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing six (6) new 
1975 four door sedans to be used by the Police 
Department, said purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen: and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to transfer by a good 
and sufficient bill of sale title to one (1) 1971, one (1) 
1973 and four (4) 1974 cruisers now being used by the 
Police Department: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum 
of $4,900.00 to match Law Enforcement Assistance 
Agency Federal Funds for the purpose of providing 
mutual aid programs for police departments: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a 1000 Gallon 
Pumping Engine for the Fire Department, said pur- 
chase to be made under the supervision of the Board of 
Selectmen: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of constructing and 
originally equipping and furnishing a fire station on 
Riverneck Road in East Chelmsford on land now 
owned by the Town : or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 29. In the event of an affirmative vote on 
the preceding Article, to see if the Town will vote to 
appoint an East Chelmsford Fire Station Building 
Committee consisting of five (5) members and 
authorize it to proceed with the construction of said 
project and to enter into all necessary and proper 
contracts and agreements in respect thereto and to do 
all other acts necessary for constructing said project: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a one ton truck with 
dump body for the Cemetery Department and to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) ton truck with 
dump body: or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
$5,000.00 from Perpetual Care Interest Account to the 
General Labor Account: or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
$5,000.00 from the Perpetual Care Interest Account to 
the Beautification Account: or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of constructing, 
equipping and furnishing an extension of the Cemetery 
garage and office space, said sum of money to be 
returned to the town in full over a period of years in 
annual increments by the Cemetery Commissioners 
from funds received by the Commissioners from the 
trustees under the will of Vileata S. Douglas: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the following bylaw: 

1 The purpose of this bylaw is to promote the 
educational, cultural, economic and general 
welfare of the public through the preservation 
and protection of the distinctive characteristics 
of buildings and places significant in the history 
of the Town of Chelmsford or their architecture, 
and through the maintenance and improvement 
of settings for such buildings and places, and the 
encouragement of design compatible therein. 

2. There is hereby established under Chapter 40C 
of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts as amended, a Chelmsford 
Historic Distric Commission, with all the powers 
and duties of an historic district commission 
under such statute. The Commission shall 
consist of five members and two alternative 
members. One of the five members shall be a 
resident or owner of property in an historic 
district administered by the Commission. One of 
the five members shall be chosen from two 
nominees submitted by the Chelmsford 
Historical Commission. Other members shall be 
chosen in accordance with the provisions of such 
statute. 

The initial appointments to the Commission shall 
be as follows: One member appointed for a one 
year term: two members appointed for a two- 
year term each: two members appointed for a 
three-year term each: one alternate member for 
a term of two years: one alternate member for a 
term of three years. The successors of members 
and alternate members shall be appointed for 
terms of three years. 

3. Notwithstanding anything contained in this 
bylaw to the contrary, the authority of the 
Commission shall not extend to the review of the 
following categories of building or structures or 
exterior architectural features: 

a) the color of paint 

b) the color of materials used on roofs 

c) the reconstruction substantially 
similar in exterior design of a 
building, structure or exterior ar- 
chitectural feature damaged or 
destroyed by fire, storm or other 
disaster, provided such recon- 
struction is begun within one year 
thereafter and carried forward with 
due diligence. 



4 The Commission shall review, from time to time, 
possible additional historic districts and 
propose, as they deem appropriate, the 
establishment of additional historic districts or 
changes in historic districts. The Commission 
shall report on this activity in the town annual 
report at least biennially. 

5. This Historic Distrct Commission shall adopt 
rules and regulations for the conduct of its 
business, not inconsistent with the provisions of 
the Historic District Act, Chapter 40C of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, as amended, and may, subject to 
appropriation employ clerical and technical 
assistants or consultants and may accept money 
gifts and expend same for such purpose. 

6. If any section, paragraph or part of this bylaw, 
be for any reason, determined invalid or un- 
constitutional by any court of competent 
jurisdiction, every other section, paragraph or 
part shall continue in full force and effect." 

or act in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Historic District 
Study Committee 

ARTICLE 35. In the event of an affirmative vote on 
the preceding Article, to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the establishment of an Historic District, 
under the provisions of Chapter 40C of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as 
amended, known as the Chelmsford Center Historic 
District, bounded and described as follows: 

"Commencing at a point on Littleton Road, the 
southwesterly corner of Forefathers Burying Ground 
(lot 135) Northerly by two courses along the Westerly 
boundary of Lot 135 to the Southerly side of Bridge 
Street, thence across Bridge Street to the Southwest 
Corner of Lot 100 (land now or formerly owned by Paul 
J. & Joyce D. Canniff) thence Northwesterly by two 
courses along the Southwest boundary of Lot 100 to its 
Westerly corner, then Northeast along its North- 
westerly boundary to its Northerly corner; thence 
Southeast (approx. 20 feet) along the Northeast 
boundary to the intersection with the Westerly boun- 
dary of Lot 98 (land now or formerly property of 
Margaret E. Robbins Mills): thence in a Northeast 
direction approximately 37 feet along the boundary of 
Lot 98 to an angle: thence North by East across Lot 98 
approximately 400 feet to the Northwest corner of Lot 
96 (land now or formerly owned by Joseph L., Jr. and 
Violet M. Bonsignor) : thence Northeast along the 
Northwest boundary of Lot 96 to the Westerly side of 
Westford Street: thence North diagonally across 
Westford Street to the Southeast corner of Lot 17A/2 
(land now or formerly of Evelyn Russell): thence 
Northeast along the East boundary of Lot 17A/2 to its 
Northeast corner: thence in a Northeast direction 
across Lot 17A (land now or formerly of Evelyn 
Russell) approximately 125 feet to an angle on the 
Westerly boundary of Lot 19 (land now or formerly of 
Richard O. & Mary S. Lahue) : thence Northwest along 
the Westerly boundary of Lot 19 and Lot 20B ( land now 
or formerly of Blake Memorial Funeral Home, Inc.): 
thence Northeast along the Westerly boundary of Lot 
20B to its Northmost point: thence Southeast along the 
Northeast boundaries of Lots 20B & 20A (now or for- 
merly owned by Blake Memorial Funeral Home, Inc.) 
approx. 387 feet to a point at the intersection of land 
(Lot 20-1) nor or formerly owned by Raymond A. & 



Barbara F. Carye, thence North along the Northwest 
boundary of said Carye's land to its Northwest corner: 
thence East North East by several courses along the 
Northerly boundary of said Carye's land to its North- 
most corner, then Southeast along the Northeast 
boundary to the Westerly side of Worthen Street at its 
junction with North Road (Southeast corner of Lot 
20/2) : thence Northeast diagonally across North Road 
to the Northwest corner of Lot 67A (land now or for- 
merly owned by Andrew & Lorraine C. McBride): 
thence East along the Northern boundaries of Lot 67A 
& Lot 67B (land now or formerly owned by Leroy & 
Charlotte D. Bliss) to the Eastmost point of said Bliss 
land: thence southwest along the South boundary of 
said Bliss lot (approx. 45 feet) to the Northwest corner 
of Lot 62 ( now or formerly owned by Ronald D. & Anne 
Marie Greenwood): thence South along the East 
Boundary of Lot 62 to the North side of Crosby Lane to 
the Northeast corner of Lot 61 ( land now or formerly of 
Albert W. & Mildred Willis): thence South along the 
East boundary of Lot 61 to its Southeast corner : thence 
Northwest along the South boundary of Lot 61 approx. 
30 feet to an angle, then West along the South bound- 
aries of Lots 61 & 70A to the Southwest corner of Lot 
70A thence South across Lot 71 (land now or formerly 
of Roman Catholic Diocesan of Boston) continuing in 
the same direction as the Westerly boundary of Lot 
70A, to Fletcher Street: thence continuing in the same 
direction across Fletcher Street: thence continuing in 
the same direction across Lot 73B (land now or for- 
merly of Bradford O. Emerson, John C. Carragher, 
Allen Lampert, Edward C. Becker, & Richard L. Fox) 
to the Northerly boundary of Lot 73 (land now or for- 
merly of Theodore W. Emerson) : thence East along 
the Northerly boundary of Lot 73 to its Northeast 
corner: thence South along the East boundary of Lot 73 
to its Southeast corner: thence East diagonally across 
the right of way of the N.Y., N.H. & H. Railroad to the 
Northeast corner of Lot 82A ( now or formerly owned by 
Peter R. Markham): thence Southeast along the 
Northeast boundary of Lot 82A to the Northern side of 
Chelmsford Street: thence South diagonally across 
Chelmsford Street to the corner of Lot 47 (now or 
formerly of Henry & Helen J. Eriksen) : thence 
Southeast along the Northeast boundary of Lot 47 to its 
Southeast corner: thence Southwest approx. 30 feet 
along the South side of Lot 47 to the Northern corner of 
lot 49 (land now or formerly of Parish of All Saints): 
thence South by two courses along the East boundary 
of Lot 49 to its Eastern corner on the North side of 
Billerica Road: thence West along the North side of 
Billerica Road to a point where the extension of a line 
drawn along the East boundary of lot 18 intersects the 
North side of Billerica Road: thence South across 
Billerica Road to the Northeast corner of Lot 18 (land 
now or formerly of Thomas B. & Eleanor H. Doran): 
continuing South along the East boundary of Lot 18 to 
its Southeast corner: thence West along the South 
boundary of Lot 18 approx. 145 feet to a point forming 
the intersection of Lot 18, Lot 19 and Lot 19A: thence 
South along the East boundary of Lot 19 (land now or 
formerly of Eustace R. and Nancy M. Fiske) to Beaver 
Brook : thence along the course of Beaver Brook in a 
generally Northwest direction to Boston Road: thence 
diagonally across Boston Road (Central Square) to the 
Southeast corner of Lot 1 (land now or formerly of 
Vlahos Realty, Inc.): thence Westerly by various 
courses along the South boundary of Lot 1 to the East 
boundary of Lot 146: thence Northeast along the South- 
west boundary of Lot 1 by various courses to the right 
of way of theN.Y., N.H. &H. Railroad at the Northwest 
corner of Lot 1 : thence diagonally across the Railroad 
right of way to the Eastern most point of Lot 23, and 



continuing in the same direction diagonally across 
Littleton Road to the North side of said road and the 
southern boundary of Lot 135A (land now or formerly 
of the First Congregational Society (Unitarian): 
thence Westerly along the North side of Littleton Road 
to the starting point and point of beginning": or act in 
relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Historic District 
Study Committee 

ARTICLE 36. In the event of the approval of the 
preceding two Articles, to see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate the sum of $190.00 for the operating ex- 
penses of the Historic District Commission: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Historic District 
Study Committee 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the bylaw relating to Chelmsford Conservation 
Commission Reservations by adding Section 12 as 
follows : 

12. No person or persons, including but not limited to 
individuals, associations, partnerships, cor- 
porations, trusts or public or quasi-public bodies, 
shall dump any material, trash, refuse, rubbish, 
garbage, or debris, including without limiting 
the generality of the foregoing, lumber, bricks, 
asphalt, plaster, wire, lath, paper, cardboard, 
pipe, tires, ashes, refrigerators, motor vehicles, 
or parts of the foregoing without permission by 
vote of the Commission. 



2) All references to "subdivider" or "sub- 
division" shall be changed to "applicant" or 
"project site". 

3) All references to "Planning Board" or 
"Board" shall be changed to "Conservation 
Commission". 

4) Items (1). (2). (3), in Form E shall be 
stricken and in their place the following in- 
serted : 



(1) Complete construction, in- 
cluding loaming, seeding, rip-rap 
and erosion control according to the 
plans and Orders of Conditions. 

(2) Complete restoration of areas, 
or removal of materials as specified 
in the plans and Orders of Con- 
ditions. 

(3) Complete or satisfy the other 
terms of agreement as specified 
below. 

5) Delete paragraph 3. 

All other portions of "Form E" being retained, 
as published in the Town of Chelmsford Bylaws, 
Rules. Regulations and Acts Accepted by the 
Town: 



Violators of this section shall be subject to a fine 
of not more than $50, and in addition shall bear 
the expense of all reasonable costs incurred by 
the town in the restoration of the site to its 
original condition and the lawful disposal of the 
illegally dumped materials: 



or act in relation thereto: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the town bylaws to add the following provision which 
would allow the Conservation Commission to require 
performance bonds be posted by applicants under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 131, Section 40, 
as amended: 



"The Conservation Commission may, at its 
discretion, stipulate that applicant (s) filing a 
Notice of Intent, according to Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 131, Section 40, as 
amended, be required to post a security per- 
formance bond as part of the Order of Conditions 
which the Commission is authorized to impose." 

and that the contract between the Commission 
and the applicant (s) hereby authorized shall be 
"Form E" used by the Planning Board, with the 
following changes: 

1 ) The document shall be called "Form CCA", 
Usual Form of Contract between the Con- 
servation Commission and an Applicant, under 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 131, 
Section 40. 



Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum 
of $15,000 in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 132A and Chapter 40, as amended, to 
purchase a certain parcel of land containing 9.25 acres 
more or less, located in Chelmsford off Canal Street 
which enters off Riverneck Road for Conservation 
purposes, said parcel being recorded in Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1451, Page 
310: and to authorize the Conservation Commission to 
enter into a contractual self-help agreement with the 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources: or 
act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a certain parcel of 
land containing 13.3 acres more or less located in 
Chelmsford on the easterly side of School Street, 
abutting on Stoney Brook (Assessors' Maps: Plat 196: 
B & M Lots 1-9). said land to be used for conservation 
purposes in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 132A and Chapter 40, as amended: and 
to authorize the Conservation Commission to enter into 
a contractual self-help agreement with the Depart- 
ment of Natural Resources: or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a parcel of land 
containing 31.19 acres more or less located in 
Chelmsford on Littleton Road abutting the Lime 
Quarry Reservation (Assessors' Maps: Plat 185, Block 
42, Lot 209 and Plat 190, Block 42, Lot 192), in ac- 
cordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
132A and Chapter 40 as amended, for conservation 
purposes: and to authorize the Conservation Com- 
mission to enter into a contractual self-help agreement 
with the Department of Natural Resources: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 42. In the event the Town votes to pur- 
chase the lands described in the previous article, to see 
if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to accept for the consideration of One 
Dollar ($1.00) a certain parcel of land containing 7.67 
acres more or less. Said land is located in Chelmsford 
on Littleton Road across from the Lime Quarry 
Reservation (Assessors' Maps: Plat 176, Block 41, Lots 
53 and 53A). Said land to be held, managed and con- 
trolled by the Conservation Commission for Con- 
servation purposes: or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum 
of $8,500 to be spent by the Conservation Commission in 
order to obtain updated aerial photographs of the 
entire town and a Wetlands Inventory Mapping kit: or 
act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to develop a comprehensive plan for 
constructing recreational facilities on town owned 
land: or act in relation thereto. 

Recreation Commission 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Trash Collection Bylaw by adding thereto the 
following sentence: 

"Cans and glass shall also be separated and added 
to the pickup." 
or act in relation thereto. 

Environmental Advisory Council 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will ratify the action 
of the Chelmsford Housing Authority to initiate ad- 
ditional dwelling units on scattered sites for families of 
low income pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 705 of 
the Massachusetts Acts of 1966 and acts in amendment 
thereof: or take any action in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum 
of $1,800 to be used to join or buy into the Merrimack 
Valley Home Center, Incorporated for the purpose of 
obtaining services for the care of the Town's Older 
Americans: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town of Chelmsford will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2800.00 as a 
contribution towards the needed repairs to the Mill 
Dam of Russell's Mills Pond: or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following Bylaw: 

"Copies of the Finance Committee Report, in- 
cluding the Warrant, for each Annual Town 
Meeting shall be mailed by the Finance Com- 
mittee to each residence of one or more 
registered voters of record no later than two 
weeks prior to the meeting." 

or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following Bylaw: 

"No town board, committee, commission or 
office shall schedule public meetings and no 
town building shall be open for public use, other 
than those needed for town meeting use, while 
the town meeting is in session." 

or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 



ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to petition 
the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for the enactment of a special act en- 
titled, "Positioning of Candidates on the ballot in the 
Municipal Elections as their Names are Drawn by 
Lot", said act being as follows: 

In all elections for public office within the Town 
of Chelmsford, the names of all candidates, 
including candidates for re-election, shall ap- 
pear on the ballot in the order in which they are 
drawn by lot. To the name of each candidate for 
a Town office upon an official ballot who is an 
elected incumbent thereof shall be added the 
words "Candidate for Re-election" after his 
name. The drawing of lots shall be conducted by 
the registrars of voters. Each candidate shall 
have the opportunity to be present at such 
drawing in person or by one representative 
having written authorization to appear for the 
candidate: or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 



ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following Bylaw: 



"All new appointments or re-appointments to 
appointive Town offices shall require the ap- 
pointing authority to give a minimum of two 
weeks notice of intent to fill any appointive 
opening and shall call for applications for ap- 
pointment from interested citizens." 

or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 



ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote as follows: 

"Resolve that Mansfield Drive, in the Fifth 
Precinct of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, be 
certified by the Town as an accepted street of the 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts." 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the following mentioned street, as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen, and shown by their reports and plans 
duly filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to raise 
and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the purpose of reconstructing 
the following mentioned streets: 

Barry Drive 

Tracy Road 

Kidder Road 

Zeus Drive 

Stuart Road Extension 

Providing all construction of same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining boards until such 
requirements have been met: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of reimbursing the 
Chelmsford Water District for installation of a water 
main and hydrant from Littleton Road in a southerly 
direction some 550 feet along Garrison Road for the fire 
protection of those living in the neighborhood: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from the Sinking Fund the sum of $35.00 for cleaning 
and repairing the Treasurer's Office in the Town Hall 
because of damage caused by vandals on or about July 
30, 1974, or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following amendments to its Zoning Bylaw: 

(1) By deleting in Paragraph 2.1 of Section II en- 
titled "Definitions", the definition of 
Amusement, Outdoor and inserting therein the 
following definition: 

Amusement, Outdoor - Drive-in theater, golf 
driving range, miniature golf, race track, 
amusement park, professional sports stadium or 
similar commercial recreation conducted in 
whole or in part outdoors. 

(2) By inserting in Paragraph 2.1 of Section II en- 
titled "Definitions" after the definition of 
"Camping Ground, Commercial" the following: 

Carnival — a fair, exhibition, show or similar 
event conducted by, for the benefit of or under 
the auspices of a non profit, charitable or 
religious organization, club, institution or 
association. 



( 3 ) By deleting in Paragraph 5. 1 of Section V entitled 
"Condtions", "A — Use authorized under the 
special permits as provided for in Section 11.1.2 
herein or under footnote number 14 below" and 
inserting: 

A — Use authorized under the special permits as 
provided for in Section 11.1.2 herein or under 
footnotes numbered 14 and 15 below. 

(4) Amend Paragraph 5.3 of Section V entitled "Use 
Regulation Schedule" as follows: 

(a) By inserting after the word "Barn Sale, 
Garage Sale or Yard Sale" the following: 

Carnival 15 with all symbols applicable thereto 
to be designated "A". 

( b) By adding after footnote 14 the following : 

15. Such special permit may only be issued by the 
Building Inspector, and shall not be valid for 
longer than one week, and a special permit can 
be issued to a particular organization only once 
each calendar year. 

(5) Amend Section VI entitled "General 
Regulations" by inserting the following 
paragraph 6.3.14: 

The Building Inspector may provide that 
satisfactory arrangements are made for 
adequate off-street parking prior to issuing a 
temporary special permit for a carnival. See 
footnote 15 under Section V, paragraph 5.3. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the construction of improvements to 
Central Square authorized under Spot Improvement; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to 
discontinue the present "Trash Deliveries to the 
Lowell Incinerator Site and to further authorize the 
removal of the Town's refuse" (commonly referred to 
as "Trash") to a sanitary landfill area located in 
Tyngsboro, Massachusetts utilizing Chelmsford High- 
way Department equipment, personnel and the con- 
tinuance of current pick-up procedures: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 60. In the event of an affirmative vote 
under the preceding article, to see which of the 
following two proposals as submitted by the landfill 
owner and operator will be accepted by the town: 

(a) One(l) year contract at $8.40 per ton. 

(b) Three (3) year contract at $10.00 per ton: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



19 



ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Assessors to issue the sum of $800,000.00 or 
some lesser sum from free cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the tax rate for the current fiscal period: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED TO SERVE this 
Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the 
McFarlin School - All Purpose Room, North 
Elementary School Auditorium, Junior High School 
(West) Band Room, East Chelmsford School, Byman 
School Cafetorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, North 
Elementary School Auditorium, Small Gymnasium, C. 
Edith McCarthy Junior High School, South Row School 
Auditorium, South Row School Auditorium, Westlands 
School Cafeteria and Fire House - Old Westford Road 
seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of the 
Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at 
the time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS this 24th day of 
MARCH, 1975. 

S/ Gerald J. Lannan 
S/ William R. Murphy S/ Paul C. Hart 

S/ Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. S/ Arnold J. Lovering 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, ss. 



MARCH 27, 1975 



PURSUANT to the within Warrant, I have notified 
and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
by posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Junior High 
School (West) Band Room, East Chelmsford School, 
Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School, South 
Row School Auditorium, South Row School 
Auditorium, Westlands School Cafeteria and Fire 
House — Old Westford Road, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/ William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A true copy, Attest: 

S/ William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 











APRIL 7, 


1975 
















MODERATOR for 3 years 


Prec. 
1 


Prec. 
2 


Prec. 
3 


Prec. 
4 


Prec. 
5 


Prec. 
6 


Prec. 

7 


Prec. 
8 


Prec. 
9 


Prec. 
10 


Prec. 
11 


Prec. 
12 


TOTALS 


Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr 

(Re-Election) 

Write-in 

Blanks 


514 

1 

105 


380 
56 


559 

1 

128 


233 

54 


429 
89 


508 

1 

103 


338 
56 


378 
96 


288 
57 


456 

143 


454 

1 

101 


455 
131 


4,992 

4 

1,119 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


TOWN CLERK for 3 years 




























Mary E. St. Hilaire 
(Re-Election) 
Write-in 
Blanks 


523 
97 


377 
59 


593 
95 


242 
45 


443 
75 


536 
76 


349 
45 


406 
68 


301 
44 


486 
113 


474 

2 

80 


483 
103 


5,213 

2 

900 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


SELECTMAN for 3 years 




























Gerald J. Lannan (Re-Election) 

Philip L. Currier 

Write-in 

Blanks 


213 
399 

8 


219 
209 

8 


246 
437 

5 


98 
187 

2 


185 
326 

7 


238 
365 

9 


206 
181 

7 


180 
284 

10 


117 
223 

5 


217 
370 

12 


197 
346 

13 


198 
378 

1 

9 


2,314 

3,705 

1 

95 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


TREASURER 8 TAX COLLECTOR 
for 3 yrs 




























Philip J. McCormack 

(Re-Election) 

Write-In 

Blanks 


542 
78 


386 
50 


590 
98 


243 

44 


464 
54 


528 
84 


355 
39 


415 
59 


302 
43 


487 
112 


461 

1 

94 


479 
107 


5,252 

1 

862 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


ASSESSOR for 3 years 




























Robert L. Hughes 
Janet Lombard 
Blanks 


173 

406 

41 


233 
181 
22 


228 

408 

52 


134 
127 
26 


164 
317 
37 


228 
332 
52 


192 

190 

12 


139 
301 
34 


123 
198 
24 


213 

329 

57 


206 
297 
53 


178 
344 
64 


2,211 

3,430 

474 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


TREE WARDEN for 3 years 




























Myles F. Hogan 
(Re-Election) 
Write-in 
Blanks 


529 

3 

88 


374 
62 


558 
130 


243 
44 


425 
93 


515 
97 


343 
51 


392 
82 


295 
50 


472 
127 


464 
92 


443 
143 


5,053 

3 

1,059 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


556 


6,115 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
APRIL 7, 1975 



MEMBER OF BOARD OF 




























HEALTH for 3 years 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


Prec. 


TOTALS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




Peter Dulchinos (Re-Election) 


500 


356 


565 


224 


418 


499 


335 


384 


285 


462 


442 


463 


4,933 


Write-in 




















1 






1 


Blanks 


120 
620 


80 
436 


123 
688 


63 
287 


100 


113 
612 


59 
394 


90 
474 


60 
345 


136 

599 


114 
556 


123 
586 


1,181 


TOTAL 


518 


6,115 



MEMBER OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
for 3 years (2) 

Carol C. Cleven 
(Re-Election 
Stephen G. Eriksen 
Harry A. Foster 
Myra Silver 
Stasia Wojtas 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



MEMBER of Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School District Committee for 
3 years 

StratosG. Dukakis 

(Re-Election) 340 

Francis X. Cronin 212 

Blanks 68 

TOTAL 620 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER for 3 yrs 



279 


145 


311 


90 


267 


278 


142 


256 


170 


328 


250 


311 


2,827 


134 


135 


133 


89 


99 


127 


125 


97 


66 


128 


129 


104 


1,366 


299 


332 


379 


162 


138 


309 


313 


210 


121 


167 


279 


214 


2,923 


233 


59 


285 


84 


289 


261 


53 


201 


167 


234 


194 


307 


2,367 


129 


61 


90 


71 


108 


94 


55 


77 


75 


198 


119 


96 


1,173 


166 


140 


176 


78 


135 


155 


100 


107 


91 


143 


141 


140 


1,574 


1,240 


872 


1,376 


574 


1,036 


1,224 


788 


948 


690 


1,198 


1,112 


1,172 


12,230 



217 362 155 

187 270 109 

32 56 23 

436 688 287 



279 
184 
55 
518 



319 209 

230 1 50 

63 35 

612 394 



273 

152 

49 

474 



190 333 302 

122 208 204 

33 58 50 

345 599 556 



365 3,344 

178 2,206 

43 565 

586 6,115 



Arthur J. Colmer 
(Re-Election) 
Write-In 
Blanks 


520 
100 


373 
63 


538 
150 


241 
46 


422 
96 


517 
95 


342 
■1 
51 


389 
85 


280 
65 


452 
147 


469 
87 


439 
147 


4,982 

1 

1,132 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


PARK COMMISSIONER for 3 yrs 




























Arthur L. Bennett 

(Re-Election) 

Blanks 


520 
100 


367 
69 " 


552 
136 


236 

51 


420 
98 


519 
93 


337 
57 


389 
85 


277 
68 


455 
144 


467 
89 


444 
142 


4,983 
1,132 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 



Appointed Town Officials 

(Continued from page 6) 



Department of Public Works Study Committee 

Gerald Silver Joan Schenk 

George Auchy Barbara Langworthy 

Gary Lewis (resigned) Arthur Glazer 

Jack Masschelin (resigned) 

Flood Prevention Study Committee 

Harold Costa John McCormack 

James Rogers 



Finance Committee/Board of Selectmen 
Communication Sub-Committee 

Donald McGillivray Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

Richard Sullivan William R. Murphy 



Goals Committee 



Marie Geary 
Robert Sheridan 



Arnold J. Lovering 



Patrick Vaughan 
William R. Murphy 



Chelmsford Transit Study Committee 

William Dugan Philip Currier 

Arthur Kelts James Boyle 

Mary Arnold Christina Ahern 

Insurance Advisory Committee 

Roger Welch Henrick Johnson 

Eustace Fiske Peter Dow 

Walter Hedlund 

Industrial Development Financing Authority 

Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. Walter Dronzek 

Bradford Emerson Henrick Johnson 

Gerald Wallace 

Labor Relations Advisory 

Murphy, Lamere & Murphy 

400 Franklin Street 

Braintree, MA 

(continued on page 22) 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
APRIL 7, 1975 



SINKING FUND 
COMMISSIONER for 3 yrs 


Prec. 
1 


Prec. 
2 


Prec 
3 


Prec. 

4 


Prec. 

5 


Prec. 

6 


Prec. 

7 


Prec. 

8 


Prec. 

9 


Prec 

10 


Prec. 

11 


Prec. 

12 


TOTALS 


Eustace B. Fiske 
(Re-Election) 
Write-In 
Blanks 


495 

2 

123 


361 
75 


540 
148 


228 
59 


417 
101 


490 
122 


329 
65 


386 
88 


276 
69 


449 
150 


445 
111 


447 
139 


4,863 

2 

1,250 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE 
for 3 yrs (2) 




























Elizabeth A. McCarthy 

(Re-Election) 

Thomas C. Thorstensen 

(Re-Election) 

Write-In 

Blanks 


505 
457 
278 


349 
287 
236 


549 
483 
344 


221 
191 
162 


426 

376 

1 

233 


493 
441 
290 


324 
276 
188 


389 
349 
210 


295 
236 
159 


471 
412 
315 


449 
379 
284 


446 

421 

1 

304 


4,917 

4,308 

2 

3,003 


TOTAL 


1,240 


872 


1,376 


574 


1,036 


,224 


788 


948 


690 


1,198 


1,112 


1,172 


12,230 


PLANNING BOARD MEMBER 
for 5 yrs 




























Henrick R. Johnson. Jr. 
Ann H. McCarthy 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Blanks 


268 
239 

84 
29 


196 
113 
92 
35 


225 

320 

95 

48 


49 
67 
159 
12 


209 

214 

79 

16 


298 

228 

56 

30 


197 

112 

70 

15 


193 
215 
40 
26 


93 
181 
47 
24 


173 
307 
66 
53 


351 

144 
46 
15 


155 
314 
65 
52 


2,407 

2,454 

899 

355 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


SEWER COMMISSION for 3 yrs 




























Theodore J. Rapallo 

Write-In 

Blanks 


489 
131 


345 

91 


517 
171 


223 
64 


403 
115 


476 
136 


324 
70 


363 
111 


267 
78 


439 
160 


426 
130 


412 

1 

173 


4,684 

1 

1,430 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


HOUSING AUTHORITY for 5 yrs 




























Ruth K. Delaney (Re-Election) 
Raymond L. Reynolds 
Blanks 


417 
136 
67 


301 
86 
49 


434 
174 
80 


187 
68 
32 


351 
109 
58 


460 
93 
59 


268 
85 
41 


346 
73 
55 


219 
80 
46 


382 
133 
84 


413 
93 
50 


393 
112 
81 


4,171 

1,242 

702 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 


QUESTION: "Shall licenses be 


grantee 


1 in this 


Town fo 


r the opeation, 


holding, or co 


nducting 


a game commonly cal 


led beai 


lO?" 


YES 
NO 
BLANKS 


332 
152 
136 


286 
65 
85 


384 
195 
109 


181 
47 
59 


294 
137 
87 


327 
141 
144 


230 
86 
78 


234 
154 
86 


219 
75 
51 


340 
145 
114 


292 
123 
141 


301 
173 
112 


3,420 
1,493 
1,202 


TOTAL 


620 


436 


688 


287 


518 


612 


394 


474 


345 


599 


556 


586 


6,115 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

(Continued from page 21) 

Mosquito Control Committee 

Lawrence McAllister Michael Carr 

Martin Bovey Kenneth Greeno 

Bruce Gullion 



George Marinel 



Special Police Officers 
For School Traffic Duty: 



Joan Dillon 



Karen Flynn 

Special Police Officers 
Dog Officers: 

Frank Wojtas Cheryl Constantine 

Police Matrons 



Mary Long 
Emily Peake 



Grace Auger 
Nora Clifford 



School Building Committee 

James Sullivan Paul Krenitsky 

Robert Sexton Harry McKeon, Jr. 

Anthony DeProfio Carol Cleven 

Carol DeCarolis 

Vandalism Committee 

William R. Murphy Robert McManimon 

Paul C. Hart Donald Gray 

Harry Ayotte Robert Howe 

William Reynolds Richard Campbell 

Charles Watt Robert Germann 

Water District Consolidation Committee 

Thomas Monteodorisio Jo Anne Kelch 

James McKeown William R. Murphy 

Ronald Pare David McCarthy 

Michael Devine Samuel I. Parks 

George Abely 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MAY 8, 1975 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the Chelmsford High School 
Gymnasium on Thursday, the eighth day of May, 1975 
at 8:00 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there to 
act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from free cash, or other available funds, the sum of 
$30,000.00 to the Veterans Benefit Department - Cash 
and Material Grants Account: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote in the af- 
firmative on the following question: 

Shall the Town, in addition to the payment of 50% 
of a premium for contributory group life and 
health insurance for employees in the service of 
the Town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary 
or additional rate? 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



April 30, 1975 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a 
certain sum of money from free cash to cover budget 
deficits of certain Town Departments: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Junior High 
School (West) Band Room, East Chelmsford School, 
Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School, South 
Row School Auditorium, South Row School 
Auditorium, Westlands School Cafeteria and Fire 
House — Old Westford Road seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/ William E.Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 5. 1975 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7 : 55 
P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 427 
voters present. 

After the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance to the 
Flag of the United States, a moment of silence was 
given in memory of the following men who have died 
since last town meeting: 



Charles A. House 



Theodore W. Emerson 



Member of Board of 
Assessors 1960-1974 

Member of South 
Chelmsford Water Com- 
mission 1953-1974 

Died June 2, 1974 



Member of Board of 
Selectmen 1947-1953 

Died November 25, 1974 



AND YOU ARE DIRECTED TO SERVE this 
Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the 
McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, North 
Elementary School Auditorium, Junior High School 
(West) Band Room, East Chelmsford School, Byam 
School Cafetorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, North 
Elementary School Auditiroium, Small Gymnasium, 
C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School, South Row 
School Auditorium, South Row School Auditorium, 
Westlands School Cafeteria and Fire House — Old 
Westford Road seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding this meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of the 
Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at 
the time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS this 29th day of April, 
1975. 

S/ Arnold J. Lovering 
S/ Paul C. Hart S/ Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

S/ William R. Murphy S/ Philip L. Currier 



Robert W. Barris 



Member of Board of 
Selectmen 1925-1928 

Died March 15, 1974 



Selectman Arnold J. Lovering moved that the 
reading of the Sheriff's return of the warrant and the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. It was so 
voted, unanimously. 

The following tellers were appointed: 



Robert Griffin 
Ruth Delaney 
Carol Olsson 



Richard Lahue 

Margaret Johnson 

Dorothy Lerer 



UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the reports of Town Officers and Com- 
mittees be heard. It was so voted. Selectman Paul Hart 
moved that Harry Ayotte be reelected to the Varney 
Playground Commission. A motion was made to close 
nominations. It was so voted. A vote was taken on the 
main motion. It was so voted. 



The following resolution was offered for 
deliberation and vote: 

WHEREAS, the Town of Chelmsford is annually 
required to raise funds on the property tax for support 
of state enacted programs, and; 

WHEREAS, the Town of Chelmsford does not 
receive its full entitlement under most state aid 
categories, and; 

WHEREAS, the burden to raise all these funds falls 
squarely on the taxpayers of the Town of Chelmsford, 
and; 

WHEREAS, only a small amount of revenue from 
the state is received in the Town of Chelmsford for 
municipal services not related to education; and 

WHEREAS, the property taxpayers of the Town of 
Chelmsford can no longer afford to carry the heaviest 
burden of taxation on the local taxes, 

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the 
voters of the Town of Chelmsford do hereby call upon 
their legislators and the other members of the General 
Court along with the governor to vote in favor of a 
program of municipal aid and additional educational 
aid during this legislative session and to redistribute 
the tax burden through use of the less regressive forms 
of taxes available at the state level, such as sales 
and/or income tax. 

It was so voted. 

Mr. Joseph Gutwein presented the report of the 
Sewer Study Commission. There was no action on this 
report. 

Dr. Howard K. Moore gave a report on the $98,000 
addition to the Adams Library. 

Mr. Marvin W. Schenk, Chairman of the Finance 
Committee moved to table Articles 2, 2A & 3, until after 
Article 60 has been completed. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Mr. Philip J. McCormack 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1975, in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in ac- 
cordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Mr. Philip J. McCormack 
moved that the Town vote to request the Department of 
Corporations and Taxation, Division of Accounts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of 
all accounts in all departments in the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

It was voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $2,608.17 to meet bills for previous years A 4/5 
vote required. 



It was voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
and Mr. Alfred Woods of the Recreation Commission 
moved that the Town vote to approve the filing of a 
Petition in the General Court under the provisions of 
Section 8 of Article 89 of the Amendments to the Con- 
stitituion for an act: enabling the Town to pay the sum 
of $1,875.00 to John Gurich of Chelmsford for con- 
struction of 8' wide steel re-inforced concrete steps 
constructed at the Robert's property in September, 
1974. Said steps having been completed as part of the 
Recreation Commission's development of the Robert's 
property as a recreational facility for the community. 

A 4/5 vote required. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8. Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town vote to 
discontinue the following described town way in ac- 
cordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
82, Section 21, which way is located on the northerly 
side of Main Street, opposite Meadowbrook Road, 
bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a stone bound at a southwesterly point 
of land, now or formerly of Malvina M. Arpin: 

Northwesterly by land of Arpin, two hundred thirty- 
seven and 05/100 (237.05) feet to a 
Massachusetts Highway bound: 

Northeasterly to Main Street one hundred fifty 
(150) feet, more or less: 

Southeasterly along the northerly side of Main 
Street two hundred fifty-two (252) 
feet, more or less, 

Southwesterly seventy (70) feet, more or less, to the 
point of beginning. 

Containing approximately one-half (1/2) acres, more 
or less, and being the remaining portion of land owned 
by the Town as a result of the relocation of Main Street 
and a taking by eminent domain as shown on Assessors 
Map at Plat Number 195. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,340.00 for 
the erection of signs within housing developments 
indicating the way out of the developments to main 
thoroughfares. 

It was voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to grant longevity benefits to all permanent 
employees of the Highway Department in accordacne 
with the following schedule: 

a. Upon completion of five years of employment 
said employee shall receive a three per cent 
(3%) increase. 

b. Upon completion of ten years of employment 
said employee shall receive a six per cent (6%) 
increase. 



c. Upon completion of fifteen years of employment 
said employee shall receive a nine per cent (9%) 
increase. 

d. Upon completion of twenty years of employment 
said employee shall receive a twelve per cent 
(12%) increase. 

Mr. Marvin Schenk, Chairman of the Finance 
Committee opposed this motion, stating that the cost to 
the Town would be $19,000 the first year. 

Motion defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11. Chairman of Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $16,390.00 for 
the installation of new gasoline tanks and vaulting of 
new and existing tanks at the Highway Garage. 
Selectman Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. spoke in favor of 
this article. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12. Chairman of Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to participate 
and file an application for funds under the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development Act of 1974. 

Mr. Stephen Wojcik and Mr. Jeanpaul Gravelle 
requested clarification of this article. Selectman 
William Murphy stated that $27,000 of Housing and 
Urban Development funds would be available to the 
Town. A vote was taken. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire in 
fee simple by raising and appropriating the sum of 
$100,000.00, the land and buildings of the estate of the 
late Theodore W. Emerson located at 11 North Road in 
the town for municipal purposes. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering and Chairman of the 
Finance Committee Marvin Schenk spoke in favor of 
this article. A lengthy discussion followed. A voice vote 
was taken which left the chair in doubt. A hand vote 
was taken 

YES 181 

NO 167 

Motion Passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14. Chairman of the Water 
District Consolidation Committee Jo Anne Kelch 
moved that the Town vote in accordance with the 
recommendations contained in the Weston & Sampson 
engineering report dated February, 1975 to authorize 
the Water District Consolidation Committee to proceed 
with the necessary steps to consolidate those Water 
Districts within the Town which vote at their next 
annual or special Water District meeting to become 
part of a larger municipal Water System. 

Mrs. Kelch gave an extensive report on the ad- 
vantages of consolidation, stressing that in a twenty- 
year period savings of $697,000 could be realized if 
Chelmsford changed to a municipal department in- 
stead of operating with four private water districts. 
The Finance Committee recommended this article. 



her, after which a voice vote was taken. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15. Mrs. Jo Anne Kelch moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Water District 
Consolidation Committee to obtain the necessary legal, 
financial and accounting services and incur other 
necessary expenses for a study to determine how best 
to establish a municipal water system. 

Mr. Samuel Parks of the Water District Con- 
solidation Committee explained the purpose of this 
article is for authorization for the committee to seek 
legal assistance. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16. Chairman of the Water 
District Consolidation Committee Jo Anne Kelch 
moved in the event of an affirmative vote on the 
foregoing article, I move that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $12,000.00 for such pur- 
poses. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17. Mrs. Jo Anne Kelch moved 
that the Town vote to authorize and direct the Water 
District Consolidation Committee to draft proposed 
legislation consolidating the Water Districts, which 
proposals are to be presented for approval at the next 
Annual Town Meeting or any Special Town Meeting 
prior to the next Annual Town Meeting. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18. Chairman of the Planning 
Board Stephen D. Wojcik moved that the Town vote to 
postpone Article 18, and take it up for deliberation after 
Article 56. 

Mr. Robert Raab of the Planning Board objected to 
postponing the article stating the Master Plan is 
"premature", stating that further study is needed in 
traffic, sewerage, water, and school areas. His 
presentation was ruled out of order by the Moderator. 
Mr. Arthur Riopelle spoke in favor of the motion, and 
Mr. Marvin Schenk of the Finance Committee favored 
postponement. 

A voice vote was taken which left the chair in doubt. 



A hand vote was taken: 



YES 
NO 



184 
152 



It was so voted. 



Mr. Reginald Larkin made a motion to reconsider 
Article 13 on the Emerson property, because he felt 
some voters had not been counted. 

Motion defeated by voice vote. 

Mrs. Ina Greenblatt questioned the voice vote 
decision by the Moderator, and moved that a hand 
count be taken. Since there were more than six voters 
who agreed with Mrs. Greenblatt, a hand count was 
taken. 

YES 150 

NO 187 

Motion to reconsider Article 13 defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 19. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $300,672.59 to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex 
County Retirement System, the said amount being the 
Town's share of the pension, expense, and military 
service funds. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20. Chairman of the Finance 
Committee Marvin W. Schenk moved that the Town 
vote to transfer from Free Cash the sum of $200,000.00 
to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the 
Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to transfer from Free Cash 
the sum of $79,979.00 for Chapter 90 construction. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $55,749.44 for the purchase of equipment for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to dispose of 
equipment presently being used by the Highway 
Department as follows: 

a. To purchase one truck chassis (for waste 
collections) for the Highway Department and to 
sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one waste 
collection truck presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

b. To purchase one packer body (for waste 
collection) for the Highway Department. 

c. To purchase two dump trucks for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale two dump trucks presently being used by 
the Highway Department. 

d. To purchase one Roller for the Highway 
Department. 

e. To purchase one trailer for the Highway 
Department. 

The Finance Commitee recommended this article. It 
was so voted, by voice, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $20,926.00 for the purchase and/or construction 
of a Salt Storage Shed for the Highway Department, 
said Shed to be located on the premises of the Highway 
Garage. 

Selectman Thomas Palmer spoke in favor of this 
article. Mr. Reginald Larkin asked if this storage area 
will be the same one, to which Mr. Lovering responded 

No. 

The Finance Committee did not recommend the 
expenditure. Town Purchasing Agent Christos Alexion 
stated that $7,000 could be saved in salt each year if we 
build the shed. 

A vote was taken on the motion. It was so voted, by 
voice vote. 



UNDER ARTICLE 24. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to expend $114,512.00 for various projects in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 1140 Acts of 
1973, Section 20. 

It was voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $21,986.00 for the purpose of purchasing six (6) 
new 1975 four door sedans to be used by the Police 
Department, said purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen: and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to transfer by a good 
and sufficient bill of sale title to one (1) 1971, one (1) 
1973 and three (3) 1974 cruisers now being used by the 
Police Department. 

Mr. Jeanpaul Gravelle moved to amend the above to 
read: that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $21,986.00 for the purpose of purchasing six (6) 
new 1975 compact or economy sedans to be used by the 
Police Department, said purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen to transfer 
by a good and sufficient bill of sale title to one (1) 1971, 
one (1) 1973 and three (3) 1974 cruisers now being used 
by the Police Department. The unexpended balance to 
be returned to free cash. 

Police Chief Robert Germann opposed the 
amendment. A vote was taken. Amendment defeated 
by voice vote. 

A vote was taken on the main motion. It was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 26. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $4,900.00 to match Law Enforcement Assistance 
Agency Federal Funds for the purpose of providing 
mutual aid programs for Police Departments. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $22,437 and transfer the sum of $53,263 from the 
Stabilization Fund for the purchase of a 1,000 Gallon 
Pumping Engine for the Fire Department, said pur- 
chase to be made under the supervision of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

The Finance Committee supports this article. A 2/3 
vote required for the transfer. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 28. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $275,000 for the purpose of constructing and 
originally equipping and furnishing a fire station on 
Riverneck Road in East Chelmsford on land now 
owned by the Town. 

A discussion about the need for a fire station followed 
with Fire Chief Frederick Reid answering specific 
questions. The Selectmen and Finance Committee 
favored this article. 

It was so voted, by voice. 



UNDER ARTICLE 29. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved in the event of an affirmative vote on the 
preceding Article, I move that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint an East 
Chelmsford Fire Station Building Committee con- 
sisting of five (5) members and authorize it to proceed 
with the construction of said project and to enter into 
all necessary and proper contracts and agreements in 
respect thereto, said contracts to be signed by the 
Board of Selectmen, and to do all other acts necessary 
for constructing said project. 

It was so voted, by voice. 

Mr. Stephen Wojcik moved to adjourn the meeting 
until Thursday, May 8, 1975 at 7:30 P.M. at the 
Chelmsford High School Gymnasium. 

Mr. Gerald Silver questioned the presence of a 
quorum. A count was taken showing there were 224 
voters present. 

A vote was taken on the motion to adjourn. Motion 
defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 30. Chairman of the Cemetery 
Commission Arne Olsen moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $6,047.00 for the 
purchase of a one ton truck with dump body for the 
Cemetery Department and to sell by good and suf- 
ficient bill of sale one ( 1 ) ton truck with dump body. 



It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 31. Mr. Arne Olsen moved that 
the Town vote to transfer $5,000.00 from Perpetual 
Care Interest Account to the General Labor Account. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32. Mr. Arne Olsen moved that 
the Town vote to transfer $5,000.00 from the Perpetual 
Care Interest Account to the Beautification Account. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 33. Mr. Arne Olsen moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000.00 for the purpose of constructing, equipping 
and furnishing an extension of the Cemetery Garage 
and office space, the said sum of money to be returned 
to the town in full over a period of years in annual in- 
crements by the Cemetery Commissioners from funds 
received by the Commissioners from the trustee under 
the will of Vileata S. Douglas. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

Mr. Harold Davis moved to postpone until Thursday 
May 8, 1975 Articles 34, 35, & 36 since printed 
descriptive material on these articles is not available 
tonight. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



12. No person or persons, including but not limited to 
individuals, associations, partnerships, cor- 
porations, trusts or public or quasi-public bodies, 
shall dump any material, trash, refuse, rubbish, 
garbage, or debris, including without limiting 
the generality of the foregoing, lumber, bricks, 
asphalt, plaster, wire, lath, paper, cardboard, 
pipe, tires, ashes, refrigerators, motor vehicles, 
or parts of the foregoing without permission by 
vote of the Commission. 

Violators of this section shall be subject to a fine 
of not more than $50, and in addition shall bear 
the expense of all reasonable costs incurred by 
the town in the restoration of the site to its 
original condition and the lawful disposal of the 
illegally dumped materials. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 38. Mr. Donald House moved that 
the Town vote to amend the town bylaws to add the 
following provision which would allow the Con- 
servation Commission to require performance bonds 
be posted by applicants under Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 131, Section 40, as amended: 

"The Conservation Commission may, at its 
discretion, stipulate that applicant (s) filing a Notice of 
Intent, according to Massachusetts General Law, 
Chapter 131, Section 40, as amended, be required to 
post a security performance bond as part of the order 
of Conditions which the Commission is authorized to 
impose," 

and that the contract between the Commission and 
the applicant (s) hereby authorized shall be "Form E" 
used by the Planning Board, with the following 
changes;: 

1) The document shall be called "Form CCA", Usual 
Form of Contract between the Conservation Com- 
mission and an Applicant, under Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 131, Section 40. 

2) All references to "subdivider" or "subdivision" 
shall be changed to "applicant" or "project site". 

3) All references to "Planning Board" or "Board" 
shall be changed to "Conservation Commission". 

4 ) I terns ( 1 ) , ( 2 ) , ( 3 ) in Form E shall be stricken and 
in their place the following inserted: 

(1) Complete construction, including loaming, 
seeding, rip-rap and erosion control according to 
the plans and Orders of Conditions. 

(2) Complete restoration of areas, or removal of 
materials as specified in the plans and Orders of 
Conditions. 

(3) Complete or satisfy the other terms of 
agreement as specified below. 

5) Delete paragraph 3. 



UNDER ARTICLE 37. Chairman of Conservation 
Commission Donald A. House moved that the Town 
vote to amend the bylaw relating to Chelmsford 
Conservation Commission Reservations by adding 
Section 12 as follows: 



All other portions of "Form E" being retained, as 
published in the Town of Chelmsford Bylaws, Rules, 
Regulations and Acts Accepted by the Town. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 39. Mr. Donald A. House moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,000 in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 131A and Chapter 40, as amended, to 
purchase a certain parcel of land containing 9.25 acres 
more or less, located in Chelmsford off Canal Street 
which enters off Riverneck Road for Conservation 
purposes, said parcel being recorded in Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1451, Page 
310; and to authorize the Conservation Commission to 
enter into a contractual self-help agreement with the 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources. 

A 2/3 vote required. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 40. Concerning purchase of 13.3 
acres of easterly side of School Street, abutting Stoney 
Brook by Conservation Commission, Mr. Donald House 
moved to dismiss this article. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 41. Mr. Donald A. House moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$43,000.00 for the purchase of a parcel of land con- 
taining 31.19 acres more or less located in Chelmsford 
on Littleton Road abutting the Lime Quarry Reser- 
vation (Assessors' Maps: Plat 185, Block 42, Lot 209 
and Plat 190, Block 42, Lot 192), in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 132A and 
Chapter 40 as amended, for conservation purposes; 
and to authorize the Conservation Commission to enter 
into a contractual self-help agreement with the 
Department of Natural Resources. 

A 2/3 vote required. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 42. Mr. Donald A. House moved 
in the event the Town votes to purchase the lands 
described in the previous article, I move that the Town 
vote to authorize the Conservation Commission to 
accept for the consideration of One Dollar ($1.00) a 
certain parcel of land containing 7.67 acres more or 
less. Said land is located in Chelmsford on Littleton 
Road across from the Lime Quarry Reservation 
(Assessors' Maps: Plat 176, Block 41, Lots 53 and 53A). 
Said land to be held, managed and controlled by the 
Conservation Commission for Conservation purposes. 

It was voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 43. Mr. Donald A. House moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $8,500.00 to 
be spent by the Conservation Commission in order to 
obtain updated aerial photographs of the entire town 
and a Wetlands Inventory Mapping kit. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering moved for adjournment 
until Thursday, May 8th at 7:30 P.M. in the High School 
Gymnasium. Meeting adjourned at 11:05 P.M. 



It was so voted. 

DanielJ.Coughlin, 
Moderator 



MaryE. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 8, 1975 

The adjourned annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:50 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, 
Jr. There were 416 voters present. The following tellers 
were appointed: 



Robert Griffin 
RuthDelaney 
CarlOlsson 



Arthur Osborne 



Richard Lahue 
Margaret Johnson 
Dorothy Lerer 



Because of technical difficulty with the loud speaker 
system the Moderator called a recess to correct the 
problem. 

The special Town Meeting was called to order at 8 : 00 
P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum which is 300 for a 
special town meeting. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the reading of the warrant and the Sheriff's 
return of the warrant be waived. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to transfer from free cash, 
or other available funds, the sum of $30,000 to the 
Veterans Benefit Department - Cash and Material 
Grants Account. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering recommended that this 
article pass, because of the need by veterans of the 
community. Mr. Richard McDermott stated the 
Finance Committee supports this article. The vote was 
taken by raising hands. It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 2. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote in the affirmative on the 
following question. 

Shall the Town, in addition to the payment of 50% 
of a premium for contributory group life and 
health insurance for employees in the service of 
the Town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary 
or additional rate? 

Selectman Arnold Lovering asked for dismissal of 
this article by a No vote, because we are in the process 
of collective bargaining with Unions. Mr. Richard 
McDermott of the Finance Committee recommended a 
No vote on the article. 

A hand vote was taken — Motion defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 3. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved the Town vote to transfer $10,000 from free cash 
to cover budget deficits of certain Town departments. 

Mr. Norman Labrecque questioned the transfer 
needs. Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Com- 
mittee explained where the funds were going, and 
recommended a favorable vote on this article. 

It was so voted. 

Mr. Maurice Teehan moved for reconsideration of 
Article 2. 



It was so voted. 



RECONSIDERATION OF ARTICLE 2. Selectman 
Arnold J. Lovering again explained that negotiations 
were going on with unions, and recommended a No 
vote on Article 2. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended a No vote, since all town employees would 
benefit after union negotiations are complete. Mr. 
Arthur Riopelle questioned what unions. Mr. Mc- 
Dermott explained that the Police, Fire, Highway, and 
School Departments are represented by unions. After 
further debate a vote was taken by a showing of hands. 
Since the chair was in doubt a hand count was taken: 



YES 




161 


NO 


Motion Defeated 


165 



A question on the accuracy of the hand count was 
ruled out of order by the Moderator. 

The special Town Meeting adjourned sine die at 8:35 
P.M. 

The annual Town Meeting was then called to order 
by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 



UNDER ARTICLE 34. Mr. Harold Davis moved to 
amend Article 34 by adding to Section 3 the following: 

d) storm doors and windows, screen doors and 
windows. 

A ten minute recess was called by the Moderator at 
8:45 P.M. for a personal emergency call. The meeting 
was again called to order at 8:55 P.M. 

A vote was taken on Mr. Davis motion to amend 
Article 34. It was so voted. 

Mr. Harold Davis of the Chelmsford Historic Study 
Committee moved that the Town vote to approve the 
following bylaw: 

1. The purpose of this bylaw is to promote the 
educational, cultural, economic and general 
welfare of the public through the preservation 
and protection of the distinctive characteristics 
of buildings and places significant in the history 
of the Town of Chelmsford or their architecture, 
and through the maintenance and improvement 
of settings for such buildings and places, and the 
encouragement of design compatible therein. 

2. There is hereby established under Chapter 40C of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts as amended, a Chelmsford 
Historic District Commission, with all the 
powers and duties of an historic district com- 
mission under such statute. The Commission 
shall consist of five members and two alternate 
members. One of the five members shall be a 
resident or owner of property in an historic 
district administered by the Commission. One of 
the five members shall be chosen from two 
nominees submitted by the Chelmsford 
Historical Commission. Other members shall be 
chosen in accordance with the provisions of such 
statute. 

The initial appointments to the Commission shall 
be as follows : One member appointed for a one 
year term: two members appointed for a two- 
year term each: two members appointed for a 



three-year term each: one alternate member for 
a term of two years : one alternate member for a 
term of three years. The successors of members 
and alternate members ahll be appointed for 
terms of three years. 

3. Notwithstanding anything contained in this 
bylaw to the contrary, the authority of the 
Commission shall not extend to the review of the 
following categories of building or structures or 
exterior architectural features: 

a) the color paint 

b) the color of materials used on roofs 

c) the reconstruction substantially similar 

in exterior design of a building, structure 
or exterior architectural feature damaged 
or destroyed by fire, storm or other 
disaster, provided such reconstruction is 
begun within one year thereafter and 
carried forward with due diligence. 

d) storm doors and windows, screen doors 
and windows. 

4. The Commission shall review, from time to time, 
possible additional historic districts and 
propose, as they deem appropriate, the 
establishment of additional historic districts or 
changes in historic districts. The Commission 
shall report on this activity in the town annual 
report at least biennially. 

5. The Historic District Commission shall adopt 
rules and regulations for the conduct of its 
business, not inconsistent with the provisions of 
the Historic District Act, Chapter 40C of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, as amended, and may, subject to 
appropriation employ clerical and technical 
assistants or consultants and may accept money 
gifts and expend same for such purpose. 

6. If any section, paragraph or part of this bylaw, 
be for any reason, determined invalid or un- 
constitutional by any court of competent 
jurisdiction, every other section, paragraph or 
part shall continue in full force and effect." 

After a lengthy debate on the above article Mr. 
Gordon Reed made a motion to stop debate. It was so 
voted, unanimously. 

A vote was taken on the main motion as amended, 
2/3 vote required for passage. 



YES 
NO 



175 
71 



It was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 35. Mr. Harold Davis moved that 
in the event of an affirmative vote on the preceding 
Article, I move the Town vote to authorize the 
establishment of an Historic District, under the 
provisions of Chapter 40C of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as amended, known 
as the Chelmsford Center Historic District, bounded 
and described as follows: 

"Commencing at a point on Littleton Road, the 
southwesterly corner of Forefathers Burying Ground 
(lot 135) Northerly by two courses along the Westerly 



boundary of Lot 135 to the Southerly side of Bridge 
Street, thence across Bridge Street to the Southwest 
Corner of Lot 100 (land now or formerly owned by Paul 
J. & Joyce D. Canniff), thence Northwesterly by two 
courses along the Southwest boundary of Lot 100 to its 
Westerly corner, then Northeast along its North- 
westerly boundary to its Northerly corner; thence 
Southeast (approx. 20 feet) along the Northeast 
boundary to the intersection with the Westerly bound- 
ary of Lot 98 (land now or formerly property of 
Margaret E. Robbins Mills): thence in a Northeast 
direction approximately 37 feet along the boundary of 
Lot 98 to an angle: thence North by East across Lot 98 
approximately 400 feet to the Northwest corner of Lot 
96 (land now or formerly owned by Joseph L., Jr. and 
Violet M. Bonsignor): thence Northeast along the 
Northwest boundary of Lot 96 to the Westerly side of 
Westford Street: thence North diagonally across 
Westford Street to the Southeast corner of Lot 17A/2 
(land now or formerly of Evelyn Russell): thence 
Northeast along the East boundary of Lot 17A/2 to its 
Northeast corner: thence in a Northeast direction 
across Lot 17A (land now or formerly of Evelyn 
Russell) approximately 125 feet to an angle on the 
Westerly boundary of Lot 19 (land now or formerly of 
Richard O. & Mary S. Lahue) : thence Northwest along 
the Westerly boundary of Lot 19 and Lot 20B (land now 
or formerly of Blake Memorial Funeral Home, Inc.): 
thence Northeast along the Westerly boundary of Lot 
20B to its Northmost point: thence Southeast along the 
Northeast boundaries of Lots 20B & 20A (now or for- 
merly owned by Blake Memorial Funeral Home, Inc.) 
approx. 387 feet to a point at the intersection of land 
(Lot 20-1) now or formerly owned by Raymond A. & 
Barbara F. Carye, thence North along the Northwest 
boundary of said Carye's land to its Northwest corner: 
thence East North East by several courses along the 
Northerly boundary of said Carye's land to its North- 
most corner, then Southeast along the Northeast 
boundary to the Westerly side of Worthen Street at its 
junction with North Road (Southeast corner of Lot 
20/2) : thence Northeast diagonally across North Road 
to the Northwest corner of Lot 67A (land now or for- 
merly owned by Andrew & Lorraine C. McBride): 
thence East along the Northern boundaries of Lot 67A 
& Lot 67B (land now or formerly owned by Leroy & 
Charlotte D. Bliss) to the Eastmost point of said Bliss 
land: thence southwest along the South boundary of 
said Bliss lot (approx. 45 feet) to the Northwest corner 
of Lot 62 ( now or formerly owned by Ronald D. & Anne 
Marie Greenwood): thence South along the East 
Boundary of Lot 62 to the North side of Crosby Lane to 
the Northeast corner of Lot 61 (land now or formerly of 
Albert W. & Mildred Willis) : thence South along the 
East boundary of Lot 61 to its Southeast corner: thence 
Northwest along the South boundary of Lot 61 approx. 
30 feet to an angle, then West along the South bound- 
aries of Lots 61 & 70A to the Southwest corner of Lot 
70A thence South across Lot 71 (land now or formerly 
of Roman Catholic Diocesan of Boston) continuing in 
the same direction as the Westerly boundary of Lot 
70A, to Fletcher Street: thence continuing in the same 
direction across Fletcher Street: thence continuing in 
the same direction across Lot 73B (land now or for- 
merly of Bradford O. Emerson, John C. Carragher, 
Allen Lampert, Edward C. Becker, & Richard L. Fox) 
to the Northerly boundary of Lot 73 (land now or for- 
merly of Theodore W. Emerson): thence East along 
the Northerly boundary of Lot 73 to its Northeast 
corner: thence South along the East boundary of Lot 73 
to its Southeast corner: thence East diagonally across 
the right of way of the N.Y., N.H. & H. Railroad to the 
Northeast corner of Lot 82A ( now or formerly owned by 
Peter R. Markham): thence Southeast along the 



Northeast boundary of Lot 82A to the Northern side of 
Chelmsford Street: thence South diagonally across 
Chelmsford Street to the corner of Lot 47 (now or 
formerly of Henry & Helen J. Eriksen): thence 
Southeast along the Northeast boundary of Lot 47 to its 
Southeast corner: thence Southwest approx. 30 feet 
along the South side of Lot 47 to the Northern corner of 
Lot 49 (land now or formerly of Parish of All Saints) : 
thence South by two courses along the East boundary 
of Lot 49 to its Eastern corner on the North side of 
Billerica Road: thence West along the North side of 
Billerica Road to a point where the extension of a line 
drawn along the East boundary of lot 18 intersects the 
North side of Billerica Road: thence South across 
Billerica Road to the Northeast corner of Lot 18 (land 
now or formerly of Thomas B. & Eleanor H. Doran) : 
continuing South along the East boundary of Lot 18 to 
its Southeast corner: thence West along the South 
boundary of Lot 18 approx. 145 feet to a point forming 
the intersection of Lot 18, Lot 19 and Lot 19A: thence 
South along the East boundary of Lot 19 (land now or 
formerly of Eustace R. and Nancy M. Fiske) to Beaver 
Brook : thence along the course of Beaver Brook in a 
generally Northwest direction to Boston Road: thence 
diagonally across Boston Road (Central Square) to the 
Southeast corner of Lot 1 (land now or foermerly of 
Vlahos Realty, Inc.), thence Westerly by various 
courses along the South boundary of Lot 1 to the East 
boundary of Lot 146: thence Northeast along the South- 
west boundary of Lot 1 by various courses to the right 
of way of the N.Y., N.H. & H. Railroad at the Northwest 
corner of Lot 1 : thence diagonally across the Railroad 
right of way to the Eastern most point of Lot 23, and 
continuing in the same direction diagonally across 
Littleon Road to the North side of said road and the 
southern boundary of Lot 135A (land now or formerly 
of the First Congregational Society (Unitarian): 
thence Westerly along the North side of Littleton Road 
to the starting point and point of beginning." 

A debate on the above historic boundaries and 
limitations to property owners resulted in a motion by 
Paul Murphy to stop debate. It was so voted, 
unanimously. 

A 2/3 vote was required for passage. A hand count 
was taken 





174 




43 


It was so voted. 





UNDER ARTICLE 36. Mr. Harold Davis moved in 
the event of the approval of the preceding two Articles 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$190.00 for the operating expenses of the Historic 
District Commission. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 44. Mr. Alfred Woods, Chairman 
of the Recreation Commission moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $7,000 to 
develop a comprehensive plan for constructing 
recreational facilities on town owned land. 

Mr. William Dempster spoke in favor of article. The 
Finance Committee recommended passage. It was so 
voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 45. Mrs. Ina Greenblatt moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Trash Collection 
Bylaw by adding thereto the following sentence: 



"Cans and glass shall also be separated and added to 
the pickup." 

Selectman Paul Hart recommended defeat of this 
article, and Mrs. Greenblatt agreed with the Select- 
men. The Finance Committee was against this article 
also the Environmental Advisory Council went on 
record as opposed. 

A vote was taken. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 46. Chairman of the Chelmsford 
Housing Authority Claude Harvey moved that the 
Town ratify the action of the Chelmsford Housing 
Authority to initiate additional dwelling units on 
scattered sites for families of low income pursuant to 
the provisions of Chapter 705 of the Massachusetts Acts 
of 1966 and acts in amendment thereof. 

Housing Authority Secretary Ruth Delaney 
requested approval of this article from the voters, and 
answered questions presented to her concerning the 
renovation of low income dilapated houses in scattered 
sections of Town. Stella Maybury of the League of 
Women Voters requested support of Article 46. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 47. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate $1,800 to be used to join or 
buy into the Merrimack Valley Home Care Center, 
Incorporated for the purpose of obtaining services for 
the care of the Town's Older Americans. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee 
approved this article. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 48. Selectman Arnold Lovering 
moved Article 48 be dismissed since it has been ruled 
illegal by Town Counsel. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 49. Chairman of the Home Rule 
Advisory Committee Thomas Dougherty moved that 
the Town vote to adopt the following Bylaw: 



"Copies of the Finance Committee Report, in- 
cluding the Warrant, for each Annual Town 
Meeting shall be mailed by the Finance Com- 
mittee to each residence of one or more 
registered voters of record no later than two 
weeks prior to the meeting." 

Mr. Dougherty spoke in favor of the bylaw 
stating it is the obligation of the town to inform 
the voters about issues to be considered at town 
meeting. Mr. Richard McDermott spoke against 
article stating it is impossible to have all the 
financial information required in print and 
mailed out two weeks before the meeting, also 
the cost involved would not in his opinion bring 
more voters to town meeting. 

After a lengthy debate on this subject a motion 
was made to stop debate. It was so voted, 
unanimously. 

A vote was taken on the main motion. Motion 
defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 50. Chairman Home Rule Ad- 
visory Committee Thomas Dougherty moved that the 
Town vote to adopt the following Bylaw: 

"No town board, committee, commission or 
office shall schedule public meetings while the 
town meeting is in session." 

It was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 51. Chairman of the Home Rule 
Advisory Committee Thomas Dougherty moved that 
the Town vote to petition the Great and General Court 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the 
enactment of a special act entitled, "Positioning of 
Candidates on the ballot in the Municipal Elections as 
their Names are Drawn by Lot", said act being as 
follows : 

In all ections for public office within the Town of 
Chelmsford, the names of all candidates, including 
candidates for re-election, shall appear on the ballot in 
the order in which they are drawn by lot. To the name 
of each candidate for a Town office upon an official 
ballot who is an elected incumbent thereof shall be 
added the words "Candidate for Re-election" after his 
name. The drawing of lots shall be conducted by the 
Registrars of Voters. Each candidate shall have the 
opportunity to be present at such drawing in person or 
by one representative having written authorization to 
appear for the candidate. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 52. Chairman Home Rule Ad- 
visory Committee Thomas Dougherty moved that the 
Town vote to adopt the following Bylaw: 

"All new appointments or re-appointments to ap- 
pointive Town offices shall require the appointing 
authority to give a minimum of two weeks notice of 
intent to fill any appointive opening and shall call for 
applications for appointment from interested 
citizens." 

Selectman William Murphy opposed this article as 
did Mr. McDermott of the Finance Committee. Mr. 
Gerald Silver spoke in favor of motion. 

A vote was taken. Motion defeated. The decision of 
the chair was questioned. A hand count was taken: 





101 




107 


Motion Defeated. 





UNDER ARTICLE 53. Mr. Richard J. Russell moved 
that the Town vote as follows: 

"Resolve that Mansfield Drive, in the Fifth Precinct 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, be certified by the 
Town as an accepted street of the Town of Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts." 

The Finance Committee recommended a Yes vote on 
the above. It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 54. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to accept the following mentioned streets, as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen, and shown by their 
reports and plans duly filed in the Office of the Town 
Clerk, and to raise and appropriate no sum of money 
for the purpose of reconstructing the following men- 
tioned streets: 

Barry Drive 

Tracy Road 

Kidder Road 

Zeus Drive 

Stuart Road Extension 

Providing all construction of same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met. 

A motion was made to amend the above to include 
Schofield Road. This motion was ruled out of order by 
the Moderator. A vote was taken on the main motion. It 
was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 55. Ms. Sandra Ludwig moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,000 for the purpose of reimbursing the Chelmsford 
Water District for installation of a water main and 
hydrant from Littleton Road in a southerly direction 
some 550 feet along Garrison Road for the fire 
protection of those living in the neighborhood. 

Selectman Philip Currier spoke in favor of this ar- 
ticle. The Planning Board also urged passage. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

Mr. McDermott of the Finance Committee stated 
that the Finance Committee proposes not to act on 
budget items in the order in which they appear in the 
book, but will recommend taking the School Budget 
and the Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational School 
budget up first at next session of Town Meeting. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering moved for adjournment 
at 11:05 P.M. until Monday, May 12, 1975 at the High 
School Gymnasium. It was so voted. 



DanielJ. Coughlin, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



UNDER ARTICLE 56. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to transfer from the Sinking Fund the sum of 
$35.00 for cleaning and repairing the Treasurer's office 
in the Town Hall because of damage caused by vandals 
on or about July 30, 1974. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18. Chairman of the Planning 
Board Stephen D. Wojcik moved to dismiss Article 18 
re: Master Plan, because the zoning map had not been 
properly published. It will be brought up at a later 
date. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 57. Chairman of the Planning 
Board Stephen D. Wojcik moved to postpone this ar- 
ticle until after Article 3 has been voted upon. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 58. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved to dismiss Ar- 
ticle 58 ( Central Square Spot improvement) . 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 59 & 60. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved to dismiss both 
articles on Trash Removal. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee 
moved to consider Article 3, Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School budget. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
DISTRICT — Chelmsford assessment 45.49% 
$509,628.00. 

Mr. Stratos Dukakis moved we pay our share of the 
Operating and maintenance budget. 

It was so voted. 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee 
moved to take out of order the budget of the Chelms- 
ford School Department. 

It was so voted. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MAY 12, 1975 

The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:00 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, 
Jr. who recognized the presence of a quorum. There 
were 313 voters present: 

The following tellers were appointed: 



Richard Lahue 
Dorothy Lerer 
Margaret Johnson 



Ruth Delaney 

Robert Griffin 

Thomas Thorstensen 



UNDER ARTICLE 3 . SCHOOL 

DEPARTMENI 



mended 
1975-76 



185. School Committee S 27,300 

186. Superintendents Office 234,107 

187. Supervision 236,422 

188. Principals 576,091 

189. Teaching 6,720,256 

1 90. Textbooks 1 33,294 

191. Library 290,910 

192. Audio-Visual 144,758 

193. Guidance 334,501 

194. Work Study 18,340 

195. Psychological Services 00 

1 96. School Attendance 1 5,975 

197. Health Services 74,628 

198. Transportation 761,900 

199. FoodService 62,471 

200. Athletics 89,600 

201. Other Student Activities 29,000 

202. Driver Education 2,000 

203. Health Education 44,993 

204. Custodial 581,020 

205. Utilities 395,850 

206. Maintenance of Grounds 27,965 

207. Maintenance of Buildings 98,160 

208. Maintenance of Equipment 56,140 

209. Moving Expenses 00 

210. Adult Education 16,402 

211. Civic Activities 18.147 

212. Programs with other Schools 15,000 

Subtotal $11 ,005.230 

Chapter 766 714,237 

Subtotal 11,719,467 

Less Undistributed Reduction -50,000 

TOTAL $11 ,669.467 

Minus Public Law Funds -375,000 

TOTAL TOWN FUNDS $11 ,294,467 

RECEIPTS 

213. State Education Aid Law $3,375,202 

214. Tuition 8 Transportation of State Wards 12,078 

215. School Transportation 1,139,088 

216. Rental of Auditoriums 100 

217. Custodial Services 14,000 

218. Special Education -Chapter 766 96,508 

219. Vocational Education 35.849 

220. Dog Licenses 5,000 

221. Miscellaneous 4,200 

222. Adult Evening Education 7,825 

223 Federal Funds 375,000 

Total Receipts $ 5,064,850 

Net Cost to Chelmsford $ 6,604,617 

Mr. George Ripsom moved that we accept the School 
budget of $11,669,467 less 375,000 from Federal Funds, 
making a total of $11,294,467. 

Mr. Robert Hall gave a clear explanation of the 
School budget as listed. The Finance Committee 
recommended we vote on the school budget. 

It was so voted. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering moved for a recess at 
9: 15 P.M. The meeting was called to order at 9 :30 P.M. 
by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Arnold J. Lovering moved that the Town 
vote to further amend Sub-Paragraph 3 (Moth 
Superintendent) of Paragraph B (Conservation and 
Cemetery) of Section 24, subtitled, "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Per- 
sonnel Wage and Salary Bylaw", by deleting 
therefrom the position of Moth Superintendent and 
inserting in its stead the position of Superintendent of 
Insect Pest Control : and further vote to amend the first 
sentence of the last paragraph of said Section 11 of said 



Bylaws by deleting therefrom the words, "December 
21st of each year" and substituting therefor the words, 
"the first Monday in April each year". 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A. Mr. Peter Vennard of the 
Personnel Board moved the Town vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage 
and Salary Bylaw", to conform to rates of pay 
negotiated by the Town with certain labor 
organizations, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 149, 
Section 178 G through 178 N : 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee 
stated we will not discuss the Highway Department, 
except one position, and we will discuss two Items for 
Fire & Police Departments. The Personnel Board 
recommended a flat rate of 6 1/2% increase over the 
current 1974-75 rates with some exceptions. 

Mr. Richard McCermott of the Finance Committee 
moved that the Selectmen's Administrative Assistant 
be paid $10,650. Mr. Arnold Lovering stated that the 
Selectmen are in favor of an increase in salary from 
$10,000 to $11,000 because of the responsibilities of the 
administrative assistant. Mr. Peter Vennard of the 
Personnel Board favored this increase also, and moved 
Line Item 7 be changed to $11,000. 

A voice was taken on Line Item 7. Selectmen's Ad- 
ministrative Ass't., $11,000. The chair was in doubt. He 
requested the showing of hands. Motion passed. 

A motion was made to call a vote on Line Items 1-13 
with figures instead of percentage increase with ex- 
ceptions. 

Recommended 
Fiscal July 1, 1975 



Administrative and Clerical 

1 . Veteran's Agent 

2. Clerk, Senior 

3. Clerk 

4. Town Accountant 

5. Assistant Treasurer 

6. Town Counsel 

7. Selectmen's Admin. Ass't. . . 

8. Personnel Boards Recording 

Clerk 

9. Board of Registrars Clerk. .. . 

10. Clerk 

1 1 . Planning Board Clerk 

12. Board of Registrars (3 mbrs). 

13. Town Aide 



$ 9,052.50 p. a 
7,914.02 p. a 
6,308.00 p. a 
14,910.00p.a 
1.00 p. a 
500.00 p. a 
11, 000. 00 p. a 

3.20 hr 

850.00 p. a 

3.20 hr 

3.20 hr 

360.00 ea 

8, 051. 40 p. a 



A motion was made by Mr. Peter Vennard to accept 
Lines 1-13 as amended. Motion passed. 

CONSERVATION AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemeiery Superintendent $12,21 1 .29 p. a. 

3. Superintendent of Insect and Pest 

Control 1 ,250.00 pa. 

7. Park Superintendent 12,21 1 .29 p. a. 

The Finance Committee and Personnel Board 
recommend the above figures for Line Items 1, 3, & 7. 
It was so voted. 



CUSTODIAL 

1 . Custodian (Center Hall) 

2. Custodian (Library) 

3. Custodian (Police Department) 

It was so voted. 



3 53hr. 
3.53hr. 
3.53hr 



LIBRARY Recommended July 1 , 1975 

1 Librarian MLS $!4,330.64p.a. 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 10,227.50p.a. 

3. Branch Librarian 8,525.33p.a. 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 3,54hr. 

5 Junior Assistant Librarian 3.02hr. 

6. Clerk 3.20hr. 

7. Aides 2.21hr. 

Judith Blume moved that we adjourn until correct 
figures can be given on wages. The Finance Committee 
opposed adjournment. The Moderator refused to ac- 
cept the motion as it was given. Mrs. Blume then 
moved that we adjourn until May 19, 1975 at 7:30 P.M. 
at the High School Gymnasium. The Selectmen had no 
objection to adjournment. Mr. McDermott withdrew 
the Finance Committee's objection to adjournment. 
Selectman Arnold Lovering moved that we hold on 
items that are in collective bargaining. Motion carried, 
unanimously. Mr. Edward Hilliard objected to ad- 
journment stating the 1974-75 figures plus 6 1/2% in- 
crease were accurate. A vote was taken on the motion 
to adjourn. Motion to adjourn defeated. 

A vote was taken on Library Lines 1-7. It was so 
voted. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT Recommended July 1 , 1 975 

1. Highway Superintendent $19,170.00 p. a. 

2. Highway Foreman 6.18 hr. 

3. Administrative Assistant 9,052.00p.a. 

Richard Codling objected to the 6 1/2% increase for 
Line Item 1. Normand Labrecque moved that Line 3 be 
reduced to $1.00. Mr. McDermott of the Finance 
Committee supported the change of classification 
stating the responsibility of the position merited the 
salary figure proposed. This is one position in the High- 
way Department. A vote was taken on Mr. Labrecque's 
motion to amend Line 3 to read $1.00. Motion defeated. 

Mr. Richard Codling moved to amend Line Item 1 to 
read $18,000. A vote was taken on the main motion Line 
Item 3 — $9,052.00. It was so voted. 

Mr. Codling moved to amend Line Item 1 to read 
$18,000. This amendment was not supported by the 
Personnel Board & Selectmen. The Moderator put the 
figure of $19,170 on Line Item l to a vote. It was so 
voted. 



Mechanic - Heavy Equipment 4.96 hr. 

Custodian (Laborer • general) 3.60 hr. 

Painting Machine Operator (Only 

when employed 4.23 hr. 

Sewer Rodder Machine Operator 

(Only when employed) 4.23 hr. 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT RATE OF PAY (1975) 

1 , chief $22,700.00 p. a. 

2. Deputy Chief 18,728.00 p. a. 



Selectman Arnold Lovering moved we vote a 
statutory salary for both Chief and Deputy Chief since 
the Town Fire Department is still in the prcoess of 
collective bargaining with the union. Mr. Thomas 
Thorstensen questioned whether the collective 
bargaining is for more than 6 1/2%. Mr. Lovering could 
not answer this question. 

Mr. Gordon Reed moved we table Lines 1 & 2 until 
negotiations are complete. 

Mr. McDermott moved to pass on Fire & Police until 
next session of town meeting. The motion before us is 
to table Line 1 & 2 until next session/and or until 
negotiations are completed. Mr. Edward Quinn asked 
how Deputy Chief's salary under Item 2 would be 
determined. The Finance Committee asked Town 
Counsel Clement McCarthy's opinion on this. The 
Deputy's pay would be 165% of the highest paid 
firefighter. 

Mr. Gordon Reed withdrew his motion to table Line 
Items 1 & 2. The Finance Committee moved that under 
Police & Fire Department, Line Item 1 should read 
200% which is the statutory salary for Chiefs. Line 
Item 2 should read 165% of money voted for firefighter 
and police officer. 

Mr. Robert Griffin questioned the quorum. A count 
was taken showing 136 voters present — 200 are 
required for a quorum. 

A motion was made to adjourn until Monday night, 
May 19, 1975 at 7:30 P.M. in the High School Gym- 
nasium. It was so voted. Meeting adjourned at 10:35 
P.M. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E.St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



Line 2, Highway Foreman — $6.18 hr. It was so voted. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering requested the following 
classifications be on hold: 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

CLASSIFICATION RATE OF PAY ( 1 975) 

Assistant Foreman $4.56 hr. 

Grader Operator 5.07 hr. 

Class I - Engineer. Equip. Operator 

(TractorS Broom Oper.) 4.87 hr. 

Class II - Engineer. Equip. Operator 

(Catch Basin Cleaner Oper). 4.49 hr. 

Class III • Special Equip. Operator 

(Truck Driver, Highway 8 Waste) 



Laborer (Ashes 8 Waste) $ 3.88 hr. 

Laborer (General) 3.60 hr. 

Laborer (Skilled) 3.88 hr. 

Mechanic 4.57 hr. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MAY 19, 1975 

The adjourned annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:05 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, 
Jr. who recognized the presence of a quorum. 



UNDER ARTICLE 2A 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Recommended July 1 , 1975 



Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Arnold J. 
Lovering stated the Selectmen will not make a motion 
on the salary for the Fire Chief since his rate of pay is 
set by statute and cannot be governed by Town 
meeting. Mr. Lovering moved we vote on Deputy Chief 
which is not governed by statute, annual pay $19,945. 

2. Deputy Chief $19,945 p. a. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 



nended July 1 1975 



Selectman Lovering stated the same applied to 
Police Chief. No motion on the salary for Chief. He 
moved we voted on Captain, $19,945. 

2. Captain $19,945 p. a. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



RECREATION 



Recommended July 1 , 1975 



Mr. Peter Vennard of the Personnel Board moved to 
amend 1. Director Transportation by deleting $250.00. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

1 A. Administrative Assistant to 

Recreation Commission $ 2,000 p. a. 

IB. Director of Summer Program. .. . 1,240 p. a. 



2. Swimming Director MIN 

$70.00 wk 

3. Swimming Instructor 70.00 wk 

4. Playground Director 70.00 wk 

5. Playground Supervisor 70.00 wk 

6. Playground Instructor 70.00 wk 

7. Sports Instructor 70.00 wk 



MISCELLANEOUS 

1 . Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3 Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures. 

6. Dog Officer 

6a. Assistant Dog Officer 

7. Clock Winder 



MAX 
$100.00 wk 
1 00.00 wk 
100.00 wk 
100.00 wk 
100.00 wk 
100.00 wk 



It was so voted. 



$ 1,000. 00 p 
15,975.00 p 
2,500.00 p 
5,000.00 p 

2,000.00 p 

6,923.00 p 

5,538.00 p 

100. OOp 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

I Clerk Hire $ 2m 

I ^ Xp f nse A S 2,450. 

9a. Outlay Account 2 50 

TOTAL BOARD OF APPEALS $ 7^. 

It was so voted. 



ASSESSORS 
SALARIES: 

10. Assessor (Full Time) $ 14,910 

11. Board Member (Part Time) (2) 7,159. 

12. Senior Clerk (4) 31655 

13. Clerk (Part Time) oo' 

TOTAL $ 53,724. 

EXPENSES: 

14. Office Expenses $ 5,000. 

15. Transportation 1 000. 

16. Outlays 00. 

17. Data Proc. (Tax Billing) ... . 6,000. 

TOTAL $ 12,000. 

TOTAL ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT $ 65,724. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



ARTICLE 2A "Job Titles and Standard Rates for 
Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary 
Bylaw" as amended. 

It was so voted. 



BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMM. 

18. Expenses -- Annual Operation 

19. Accumulation Fund (1975-76) 

TOTAL BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 
COMMITTEE 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



1,171. 
8,400. 



UNDER ARTICLE 3. 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 



SALARIES: 








1 . Accountant 

2. Senior Clerk (3) 




.. $ 


14,910. 


2a. Additional Clerk Hire 








3. Severance 






3,256. 
41,908. 


TOTAL 






EXPENSES: 








4. Expenses 








5. Outlay 




00. 


TOTAL 






1,500. 


TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 


$ 


43,408. 


It was 


so voted 






ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 






6. Inspector's Salary . . . 

7. Expenser 




. $ 


1,100. 




ITOR'SDEPT 




TOTAL ANIMAL INSPEC 


$ 


1,100. 


It was 


so voted. 







BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 
(Includes Zoning Bylaw Enforcement) 

20. Inspector's Salary $ 15,975. 

21 . Inspector's Fees 00 

22. Sr. Clerk 1. 

23. Vacation & Sickness 1 . 

24. Transportation 1 ,500. 

25. Inspector's Expenses 1 ,890. 

26. Out of Town Expenses 250. 

TOTAL $ 19,617. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



SALARIES: 

27. Commissioners (3) $ 300. 

28. Superintendent 1 2,205. 

29. General Labor 24,624. 

30. Special Labor for Lot Owners 700. 

TOTAL $ 37,829. 

31. Interments 4,500. 

32. Transportation Superintendent 300. 

33. Expenses 8,150. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 

OUTLAYS S 1.750 

34. Town Clerk - Salary 00. 

35. Town Clerk - Expenses 00. 

36. Beautification •• Perpetual Care 00. 

37. Out of State Expenses 200. 

38. Restore Forefather's 8 Hart Pond 1,000. 

TOTAL $ 15,900. 

TOTAL CEMETERY DEPARTMENT $ 53,729. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

39. Expenses $ 3,400. 

40. Outlays 3,400. 

TOTAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE $ 6,800. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

41. Expenses $ 11,600. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

CONSTABLE 

42. Constable's Salary $ 12 °- 

COUNCIL ON AGING 



43. Salary $ 00. 

44. Expenses 6,925. 

45. Transportation Expenses 3,50 0. 

TOTAL COUNCIL ON AGING $ 10,425. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

DEBT AND INTEREST 

46. North School Loan $ 00. 

47. High School Loan No. 1 , 50.000. 

48. High School Loan No. 2 85,000. 

49. Highway Garage Loan 5,000. 

50. South Row Elementary School Loan 45,000. 

51. Addition to High School 00. 

52. Junior High School Loan 110,000. 

53. Pine Ridge Equipment 00. 

54 Westland Elem School Loan & 

55. Harrington Elem. School Loan 160,000. 

56. Byam Elementary School Loan 105,000. 

57. High School- 1972 850,000. 

DEBT TOTAL $ 1,410,000. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

INTEREST 

58. North School Loan $ 00. 

59. High School Loan No. 1 3,500. 

60. High School Loan No. 2 8,160. 

61 . Highway Garage Loan 00. 

62. Anticipation of Revenue & 

Reimbursement Loans 50,000. 

63. South Row Elem. School Loan 9,450. 

64. Addition to High School 00. 

65. Junior High School 31 ,363. 

66. Pine Ridge Equipment 00. 

67. Westland Elem. School Loan & 

68. Harrington Elem. School Loan 85,140. 

69. Byam Elementary School Loan 89,850. 

70. High School - 1972 280,500. 

INTEREST TOTAL $ 557,963. 

TOTAL DEBT S INTEREST $ 1 ,967,963. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



DOG OFFICER 
SALARIES: 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 



6.923. 
5,538. 
1,500 



71. Dog Officer 

72. Assistant Dog Officer 

73. Expenses 

TOTAL DOG OFFICER 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

DUTCH ELM CONTROL 



74. Superintendent $ 00. 

75. Expenses 00. 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL 00. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

76. Expenses $ 00. 

This item is included in Varney Playground 
ELECTIONS 

77. Wages and Expenses $ 18,340. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

78. Expenses $ 1,500. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

79. Officers and Administration $ 114,149. 

80. Regular and Substitute Account 719,036. 

TOTAL $ 883,185. 

EXPENSES: 

81 . Maintenance 8 Equipment 41 ,675. 

82. Outlays 4,900. 

83. Out of State 400. 

84. Stabilization Fund (Equipment) 15,000. 

TOTAL $ 61 ,975. 

TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT $ 895, 1 60. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

GAS PIPING 8 FIXTURE DEPARTMENT 

85. Inspectors Fees $ 00. 

85a. Inspectors Salary 2,500. 

86. Expenses 00. 



TOTAL GAS PIPING 8 FIXTURE DEPT. ... $ 2,500. 

HEALTH 8 SANITATION DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

87. Board Members $ 828. 

88. Director of Public Health 18,000- 

Mr. Paul McCarthy moved to amend Line 88 to $18,000 
instead of $17,360. The Finance Committee supported this 
amendment. A vote was taken which left chair in doubt. 
A hand vote was taken. Motion carried. 



89. Senior Clerk 

90. Plumbing Inspector - Fees & Transfers 

91 . Physicians 

92. Vacation and Sickness 

TOTAL 



7,914. 

2,000. 

1,000. 

500. 



29,602. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 



4,700. 

1. 

1,500. 

1,920. 

350. 

600. 



9,071. 



93. Health 8 Professional Services $ 

94. Mosquito Control Study 

95. Transportation Directors 

96. Other Expenses 

97. Out of State Expense 

Outlay 

TOTAL $~ 

TOTAL SALARIES 8 EXPENSES $ 

It was so voted, as amended. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



98. This number omitted in Finance Committee 5-19-75 
Book. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering moved to amend Line 101. 
Engineer's Fees from $4,500 to $10,000. The Finance Commit- 
tee agreed with this amendment. It was so voted. 



99. Superintendent $ 19,170. 

100. Administrative Ass't - Highway 9,053. 

101. Engineer's Fees 10,000. 

101. Sr. Clerk 00. 

( 101 used twice in Finance Booklet) 

102. Clerk Hire 633. 

TOTAL $ 38,856. 

EXPENSES: 

103. Utilities & Misc. Expense $ 30,000. 

104. Street Signs 2,300. 

105. Waste Collection 380,899. 

106. Annual Waste Clean Up Days 10,000. 

107. Maintenance 8 Repair to Garage 1,200. 

108. Outlays 00. 

HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES 8 DRAINAGE 

109. Highway Materials $ 78,000. 

110. Highway Misc. Equipment 

8 Small Tools 1 ,500. 

111. Stabilization Fund Equipment 10,000. 

112. Machinery Hire - Other 6,000. 

113. Labor -Men 216.873. 

114. Vacations and Sickness 31,912. 

115. Labor - Overtime 6,160. 

116. Radio Outlay 8 Equipment 00. 

117. Radio Repairs and Services 540. 

ROAD MACHINERY ACCOUNT: 

118. Repairs $ 23,750. 

119. Snow and Ice Removal 197,080. 

120. Highway Bridges 8 Drainage Const 45,632. 

121. Chapter 90 Maintenance 00. 

122. Sidewalks 7,000. 

TOTAL $ 1,048,346 . 

TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT $ 1,087,702. 



Mr. Robert Hall of the School Committee expressed concern 
about the delay in pursuing the sidewalk project. Selectman 
Lovering responded we do have a formal sidewalk com- 
mittee and a definite program started. 

Mrs. Ina Greenblatt questioned the waste collection figure. 
Selectman Lovering responded it will remain $13.00 a ton. 
We are also working on a plan whereby residents will 
voluntarily separate glass and cans and bring them to pick 
up spots in several convenient places in Town. 

The Highway budget as amended passed, unanimously. 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

1 23. Expenses $ 

It was so voted. 

HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

1 24 . Expenses $ 

It was so voted. 

HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



1 25. Center $ 




126. North 


9,400. 
4 300 


127. East 


128. South 


4 000 


TOTAL HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT $ 


51,340. 


It was so voted. 




INSECT PEST CONTROL 





Mrs. Ethel Kamien questioned this budget. Tree Warden 
Myles Hogan explained in detail the need for the money 
requested. 

129. Superintendent's Salary $ 1,250. 

1 29a. Expenses 13,950. 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL $ 15,200. 

It was so voted. 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

Mr. Arnold Lovering moved to amend Line Item 131 , Chapter 
32B (Insurance Employees) to read $223,500 in lieu of 
$202,500. This amount is requested to increase coverage of 
Town employees' Blue Cross to Master Medical instead of 
Major Medical. The Finance Cmmittee supports this amend- 
ment. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

130. Prop. Liab. 8 All Types of Ins $ 136,100. 

131. Chapter 32B Insurance- Employees 223,500. 

1 32. Police Professional Liability OO. 

TOTAL INSURANCE DEPARTMENT $ 359,600 

Liability Insurance - Selectmen 00. 

A vote was taken on the main motion as amended. 
Motion passed 

LAW DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

1 33. Town Counsel $ 500. 

It was so voted. 

EXPENSES: 

134. Legal Services $ 14,000. 

134a. Misc. Exp. Association Dues 1,000. 

TOTAL LAW DEPARTMENT $ 15,500. 

It was so voted. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

135. Librarian .'... $ 14,331. 

136. Assistant Director 10,118. 

137. Branch Librarian 8,525. 

138. Assistant Librarians 72,525. 

139. Library Aides 4,580. 

140. Custodian 8 Security 8,307. 

141. Vacation 8 Sickness 2,876. 

TOTAL $ 121,262. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 

EXPENSES: 

142. Repair & Maintenance of Bldgs $ 2,100. 

143. Fuel, Light and Water 8,100. 

144. Books and Periodicals 43,690. 

145. Other Expenses 7,100. 

146. Outlays 3,400. 

TOTAL $ 64,390. 

TOTAL LIBRARY DEPARTMENT S 185,652. 

State Funds Received 11,787. 

NET LIBRARY DEPARTMENT $ 173,865. 

It was so voted. 

MODERATOR 

1 47. Moderator's Salary $ 300. 

It was so voted. 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

148. Labor $ 

149. Expenses 

150. Outlays 

151 . Recreation Field Mantenance Labor 

152. Recreation Field Maintenance Exp. . 

TOTAL PARK DEPARTMENT 

It was so voted. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



i 14,608. 


3,450. 


3,000. 


2,250. 


1,000. 



PERSONNEL BOARD 
153. Expenses 



450. 



Mr. Robert Raab moved that Article 3, Line 157. Con- 
sultant be amended to the figure of $10,000, with the 
notation that this money shall be used only as Chelmsford's 
participation in the Comprehensive Planning and Manage- 
ment Program, Section 701, of the U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development. 

The Finance Committee supported this amendment as did 
the League of Women voters. After a discussion, a vote 
was taken. It was so voted. 



PLANNING BOARD 

154. Clerk Hire $ 

155. Expenses 

156. Outlay 

157. Consultant 

158. Greater Lowell Planning Fee (NMAC) 

TOTAL PLANNING BOARD $ 

It was so voted, as amended. 



1,704. 

1,000. 

250. 

10,000. 

00. 

12,954. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Selectman Arnold Lovering moved that the sum of $407,370 
be transferred from the revenue sharing fund to the Police 
Department salaries account, and that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $412,728 for said salaries 
account. It was so voted. 

SALARIES: 

159. Officers and Administration $ 149,862. 

160. Regular and Special Account 670,236. 

TOTAL $ 820,098. 

161. Maintenance and Equipment $ 82,153. 

162. Chief's Out of State Expense 150. 

163. Outlays 00. 

164. Special Education, Out of State 1 ,600. 

165. Regional Tactical Unit, Expenses 1,500. 

TOTAL $ 85,403. 

TOTAL POLICE DEPARTMENT $ 905,501 . 

It was so voted. 



SALARIES: 

166. Janitor's Salary $ 7,343. 

167. Vacation & Sickness 356. 

TOTAL $ 7,699. 

EXPENSES: 

168. Fuel, Lights Water $ 9,000. 

169. Repairs, Equipment 8 Expenses 6,000. 

170. Outlays 10,000. 

TOTAL $ 25,000. 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT $ 32,699. 

It was so voted. 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

171. Salaries, Directors & Asst. Youth $ 

172. Expenses, Youth 

173. Out of State Expenses 

174. Outlay 

TOTAL RECREATION DEPARTMENT $ 

It was so voted. 



REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

1 75. Registrars (3) $ 

176. Asst Registrars: Wages & Mileage 

177. Clerk 

TOTAL $ 

EXPENSES: 

178. Printing: Men-Women Directory $ 

179. Printing: Voters' Lists 

1 80. Other Expenses 

181 . Data Processing 

TOTAL $~ 

TOTAL REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT $ 



It was so voted. 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

182. Clerk $ 

1 83. Out of State Travel 

1 84. Expenses 

TOTAL $ 

It was so voted. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

224. Salary $ 

225. Expenses 

TOTAL $ 

It was so voted. 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

226. Chairman $ 

227. Board Members 

228. Selectmen Adm. Asst 

229. Labor Relations Advisor 

230. Clerk (2) (Part-time) 

231 . Senior Clerk (Full-time) 

231a. Purchasing Agent 

TOTAL $ 



12,650. 

90,300. 

00. 

10,500. 

113,450. 



1 ,080. 
3,500. 
4,228. 

8,808. 



1,100. 

400. 

800. 
2,500. 



4,800. 



1,000. 

00. 

300. 



1,300. 



2,000. 
1,000. 



; i ,500. 


4,000. 


11,000. 


5,000. 


5,003. 


7,914. 


650. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 
EXPENSES: 

232. Expenses $ 6,200. 

233. Conference Expenses 1,600. 

234. Outlays 00 

235. Out of State Expenses 250. 

236. Emergency Employment 00. 

237. Purchasing Agent 1,100. 

238. Photo Copy Machine 3,600. 

239. Insurance for Selectmen _ 1 ,560. 

TOTAL $ 14,310. 

TOTAL SELECTMEN'S DEPT $ 49.377. 

It was so voted. 



EXPENSES: 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 



SEWER COMMISSION DEPARTMENT 

240. Professional Fee 

241 . Expenses 

TOTAL SEWER COMMISSION 
DEPARTMENT 

It was so voted. 

STREET LIGHTING 

242. Street Lighting 

It was so voted. 

TOWN AIDE 

243. Salary 

244. Expenses 

TOTAL 

It was so voted. 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



25,000. 
1,000. 



$ 62,459. 



8,051. 
550. 



245. Expenses $ 5,000. 

It was so voted. 

TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

246. Town Clerk $ 1 0,500. 

247. Senior Clerk (2) 15,828. 

248. Clerk (Port time) 3,323. 

249. Clerk (Overtime) 950. 

TOTAL $ 30,601 . 

EXPENSES: 

250. Expenses $ 4,500. 

251. Board of Appeals • Variance Rec. Fees 50. 

252. Printing Bylaws Books 1 ,000. 

253. Outlays 00- 

TOTAL $ 5,550. 

TOTAL TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT $ 36, 1 51 . 

It was so voted. 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

254. Expenses 

It was so voted. 

TREASURER 8 COLLECTOR DEPT. 



SALARIES: 

255. Treasurer 8 Collector $ 16,103. 

256. Assistant Treasurer 00. 

257. Senior Clerk (6) 47,484. 

258. Clerk 00. 

259. Vacation 8 Sickness 1,000. 

TOTAL $ 64,587. 



260. Postage $ 9,000. 

261 . Printing, Advertising, Binding 8 

Stationery 2,000. 

262. Bonds 780. 

263. Expenses 3,800. 

264. Outlays 00. 

265. Machine Hire 00. 

266. Data Processes, Payroll 00. 

267. Purchase NCR 400 Acct. Machine 00. 

TOTAL $ 15,580. 

TOTAL TREASURER 8 COLLECTOR DEPT. $ 80,167. 

It was so voted. 

TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES: 

268. Tree Warden $ 800. 

269. Fees 4,000. 

TOTAL $ 4,800. 

Mr. Myles F. Hogan moved to amend Line Item 270 to 
read $12,500 instead of $9,500. He explained the expendi- 
ture of $3,000 is needed to replace trees that have been 
cut down. The Finance Committee was opposed to the 
amendment. A vote was taken. Motion carried. 

EXPENSES: 

270. Other Expenses $ 12,500. 

271. Outlay 650. 

TOTAL $ 13,150. 

TOTAL TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT.... $ 17,950. 

It was so voted, as amended. 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 

272. Town 8 Finance Committee Reports $ 10,000. 

273. CATV Committee 1,000. 

274. Expenses for Memorial Day 1 ,500. 

275. Expenses for Town Clock 300. 

276. Development 8 Industrial Commission 500. 

277. Ambulance Service 10,000. 

278. Lowell Mental Health Association 8,695. 

279. Veteran Pension Claims 4.586. 

280. Bus Transportation Subsidy $ 35.000. 

Mr. Murphy moved to amend line 280 to read $35,000 
instead of $29,000. The Finance Committee supported 
this amendment. After a discussion, a vote was taken 
on the amendment. It was so voted. 

281. Share Inc. (Drug Rehabilitation) $23,575. 

282. NMAC Assessment 8,952. 

TOTAL Unclassified Departments $104,108. 

VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

283. Labor $ 2,450. 

284. Expenses 3,000. 

285. Outlays 1,600. 

TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND $ 7,050. 



It was so voted. 

VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 

286. Salary of Veteran's Agent $ 9,053. 

287. Clerical 00. 

288. Expenses 1 ,550. 

289. Outlay 00. 

290. Cash 8 Material Grants 75,000. 

TOTAL Veteran's Benefits Department $ 85,603. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



39 



WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
RECOMMENDATION 



291 . Inspector's Fees 

292. Inspector's Salary 

293. Expenses 

TOTAL 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

YOUTH CENTER 

294. Salaries 

295. Expenses 

296. Outlay 

TOTAL YOUTH CENTER 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



oo. 

5,000. 
00. 



$ 5,000. 



$ 20,289. 
3,700. 
1 ,730. 

$ 25,719. 



UNDER ARTICLE 57. Mr. Stephen Wojcik moved to 
dismiss Article 57. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 61. Mr. Marvin W. Schenk moved 
that the Town vote to amend article 61 to read $650,000 
instead of $800,000. It was so voted. 

Mr. Marin W. Schenk, Chairman of Finance Com- 
mittee moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board 
of Assessors to issue the sum of $650,000 from free cash 
in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for the 
current fiscal period. 

A vote was taken on the main motion, as amended. It 
was so voted. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Arnold J. 
Lovering moved to adjourn meeting sine die at 10:00 
P.M. It was so voted. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
JUNE 16, 1975 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the C. Edith McCarthy 
Junior High School Auditorium on Monday, the six- 
teenth day of June, 1975 at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the 
evening, then and there to act upon the following ar- 
ticles, viz: 

ARTICLE l. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money to be used by the School Building Committee for 
the purpose of securing the design, specifications, 
plans and cost for the construction of a 250 pupil 
capacity auditorium addition to the new high school: or 
act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following amendments to its Zoning Bylaw: 



(l) By deleting in Paragraph 2.1 of Section II en- 
titled "Definitions", the definition of 
Amusement, Outdoor and inserting therein the 
following definition: 

Amusement, Outdoor - Drive-in theater, golf 
driving range, miniature golf, race track, 
amusement park, professional sports stadium or 
similar commercial recreation conducted in 
whole or in part outdoors. 

(2) By inserting in Paragraph 2.1 of Section II en- 
titled "Definitions" after the definition of 
"Camping Ground, Commercial" the following: 

Carnival - a fair, exhibition, show or similar 
event conducted by, for the benefit of or under 
the auspices of a non profit, charitable or 
religious organization, club, institution, or 
association. 

(3) By deleting in Paragraph 5.1 of Section V entitled 
"Conditions", "A - Use authorized under the 
special permits as provided for in Section 11.1.2 
herein or under footnote number 14 below" and 
inserting: 

A - Use authorized under the special permits as 
provided for in Section 11.1.2 herein or under 
footnotes numbered 14 and 15 below. 

(4) Amend Paragraph 5.3 of Section V entitled "Use 
Regulation Schedule" as follows: 

(a) By inserting after the word "Barn Sale, 
Garage Sale or Yard Sale" the following: 

Carnival 15 with all symbols applicable thereto 
to be designated "A". 

(b) By adding after footnote 14 the following: 

15. Such special permit may only be issued by the 
Building Inspector, and shall not be valid for 
longer than one week and a special permit can be 
issued to a particular organization only once 
each calendar year. 

(5) Amend Section VI entitled "General 
Regulations" by inserting the following 
paragraph 6.3.14: 

The Building Inspector may provide that 
satisfactory arrangements are made for 
adequate off-street parking prior to issuing a 
temporary special permit for a carnival. See 
footnote 15 under Section V, paragraph 5.3.: 

or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase and/or construction of 
a Salt Storage Shed for the Highway Department, said 
Shed to be located on town owned property: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the funds in the "Library Addition Account" to an 
account to be known as the "Land and Buildings 
Acquisition for Town Library Purposes": or act in 
relation thereto. 

Library Building Committee 

ARTICLE 5. In the event of an affirmative vote on 
the foregoing article, to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Library Building Committee acting 
under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen to 
purchase for the sum of $75,000 approximately 47,000 
square feet of land with the buildings thereon, bounded 
on the south by the Adams Library site, on the east by 
Boston Road, on the north by land of Riney and on the 
west by land of Tevlin and Adams Ave., and to expend 
a certain sum of money to renovate and equip the 
buildings thereon for library purposes: or act in 
relation thereto. 

Library Building Committee 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a 
Bylaw to establish criteria and procedures for the 
recall of an elected officer of the Town: said Bylaw to 
read as follows: 

1. An elected officer of the Town, provided that 
he has had his office for at least six months, may 
be removed from public office by the following 
procedure. Any voter of the Town may file with 
the Town Clerk a petition containing the name 
and title of the elected officer whose removal is 
sought, together with a statement of the reasons 
for his removal. The petition shall be signed in 
ink or indelible pencil by qualified voters of the 
Town equal in number to at least two per cent of 
the voters registered in the Town at the last 
annual town election. Said petition shall be ac- 
companied by affidavits signed and sworn by 
each circulator. 

2. Within five days following receipt of the 
petition the Town Clerk shall determine whether 
the petition and the affidavits are sufficient, and 
if sufficient, a recall vote shall be taken within 
ninety days, but not sooner than sixty days, 
following such determination. However, no such 
vote shall be taken if the term of office of such 
elected official shall expire within ninety days 
after the recall vote, or if such elected officer 
shall resign from office before the taking of the 
vote. Said recall vote shall be called and con- 
ducted in the same manner as is provided by 
General Laws for the call and conduct of a 
special election. 

3. The form of the question to be voted upon shall 
be substantially as follows: "Shall (here insert 
the name and title of the elected officer whose 
recall is sought) be removed from office?" A 
majority vote to recall shall not be effective 
unless at least thirty per cent of the voters en- 
titled to vote on the question shall have voted. 
Recall of such elected officer shall become ef- 
fective upon certification of the results of the 
voting regardless of any defect in the recall 
petition. If any elected officer shall be recalled, 
the vacancy created thereby shall be filled in 
accordance with the provisions of General Law, 
this Chapter and Bylaw.: 

or act in relation thereto. Petition 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a 
Bylaw to establish criteria for conflicts of interest by 
Town officers, employees, and appointed members of 
Town committees: said Bylaws to read as follows: 

1. All Town officials shall conduct themselves with 
competence and the highest ethical conduct for the 
benefit of the majority of the taxpayers in matters 
directly affecting their office. 

2. All Town officers, employees and voting appointed 
committee members shall perform the duties and 
responsibilities of their office without conflicts of 
financial interests. 

3. No Town officer or voting appointed committee 
member shall serve on any Town agency nor exercise 
his/her vote on such an agency or committee if said act 
would directly affect the income of a) that Town of- 
ficer, b) any member of the officer's immediate 
family, or c) a business associate of the Town officer. 

4. No Town officer or voting appointed committee 
member shall exercise his vote on any Town agency if 
that vote directly affects an issue involving an area in 
which he holds professional competence or is employed 
gainfully. 

5. The submission of a bid by an Town officer, em- 
ployee or committee member to the Town for any 
materials or services shall serve to cause an im- 
mediate vacating of his office. 

6. No elected Town officer or voting appointed 
member of a Town committee shall become a Town 
employee in the field of the subject matter of his/her 
appointment within four (4) years of the termination of 
the term of office or appointment. 

7. Any group of ten (10) registered voters may bring 
to the Town Counsel a request to investigate an alleged 
violation of this Bylaw. The Town Counsel shall notify 
the person accused of the allegation and request 
vacating of the office. If the person accused elects to 
vacate the office, all allegations will be dropped by the 
Town: if not, then the Counsel shall proceed with a civil 
suit for vacating the office. 

8. Any Town officer, elected or appointed, shall upon 
conviction under this conflict of interest Bylaw pay to 
the Town Treasurer an amount equal to 1.5 times the 
amount of the financial benefit received by the officer, 
member of his immediate family, or his business 
associate.: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a 
Bylaw to establish criteria and procedures for the 
suspension or removal from office of any appointed 
Town officer, employee, or appointed member of a 
committee for cause: said Bylaw to read as follows: 

1. Any appointed Town officer, employee, or ap- 
pointed member of a committee of the Town may be 
suspended or removed from office for cause. The term 
"cause" shall include, but not be limited to, the 
following: (A) Incapacity other than short term 
illness, (B) conflict of interest, (C) inefficiency, (D) 
insubordination, (E) conduct unbecoming the office, or 
(F) prolonged unexplained absence. 



2. Suspension of any such officer, employee, or 
committee member may be effected whenever the 
appointing authority deems such action necessary to 
safeguard the interests of the Town, such action shall 
be effective for no more than 30 days and may be 
coterminous with a petition of 1% of the voters 
registered when presented to the appointing authority. 

3. When removing any such officer or employee, the 
appointing authority shall act in accordance with the 
following procedure: 

A. A written notice of intent to remove and a 
statement of the cause or causes therefore shall 
be delivered by registered mail to the last known 
address of the person sought to be removed. 

B. Within five days of the receipt of such notice the 
officer or employee may request a hearing, at 
which he may be represented by counsel and 
shall be entitled to present evidence, to call 
witnesses, and to question any witnesses ap- 
pearing at the hearing. Said hearing shall be 
public and shall be held within fourteen days of 
his request. 

C. Between one and ten days after the hearing is 
adjourned or if the officer or employee fails to 
request a hearing, between six and fifteen days 
after sending of the notice of intent to remove, 
the appointing authority shall take final action, 
either removing the officer or employee or 
notifying him that the notice is rescinded. 

D. Removal action may be instituted by a citizen's 
petition of 1% of the voters registered when 
presented to the appointing authority. 

4. Nothing in this Section shall be construed as 
granting a right to such a hearing to a person who is not 
re-appointed upon the expiration of a fixed term: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to change 
the Town Bylaw on Warrant articles to read as follows: 

All articles to be inserted in the Annual Town 
Meeting must be in the hands of the Selectmen no 
later than six weeks prior to the scheduled date 
of the meeting. This also applies to Special Town 
Meetings but the time shall be four weeks prior 
to the meeting. Within one week of the close of 
the Warrant the Selectmen shall publish a list of 
titles of the articles which shall in essence 
disclose the intent of the article. At least two 
weeks prior to the meeting the Selectmen shall 
have a final draft available for interested 
citizens: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote for the 
following Bylaw: 



At least ten days prior to any Town Meeting, the 
Selectmen shall mail a copy of the Warrant 
articles to every resident taxpayer of the Town 
of Chelmsford and the Finance Committee shall 



mail its recommendations on such Warrant 
articles. The mailing may be included in the 
same document. Failure to mail such Warrant 
and recommendations on time shall cause a 
reschedule (sic) of the meeting to ten days after 
the mailing. This Bylaw shall take precedence 
over the Bylaw establishing the Annual Town 
Meeting date : 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



June 17, 1975 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room, East Chelmsford 
School, Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School 
Cafeteria, North Elementary School Auditorium, 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High 
School, South Row School Auditorium, South Row 
School Auditorium, Westlands School Cafeteria and 
Fire House — Old Westford Road seven days at least 
before the time appointed for holding the meeting 
aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

JUNE 16, 1975 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7 : 55 
P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum which is 300 for a 
Special Town Meeting. There were 499 voters present. 



The following tellers were appointed: 



Ruth Delaney 
Margaret Johnson 
Dorothy Lerer 



Edward Hilliard 

John McCormack 

Carl Olsson 



Selectman Arnold J. Lovering moved that the 
Sheriff's return of service be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously. A motion was made that the reading of 
the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Mr. Robert O'Regan moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $18,000.00 
to be used by the School Building Committee for the 
purpose of securing the design, specifications, plans 
and cost for the construction of a 250 pupil capacity 
auditorium addition to the new High School. 

A lengthy discussion developed about the need for an 
auditorium. The article was supported by the School 
Committee. The Board of Selectmen, School Building 
Committee, and Finance Committee opposed the ar- 
ticle. Mr. Gerald Shea made a motion to stop debate. A 
2/3 vote required. 

YES 412 

NO 28 

It was so voted. 
A vote was taken on the main motion. 



YES 




180 


NO 


Motion Defeated. 


282 



UNDER ARTICLE 2. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
stated that the Article as written has been ruled illegal 
by Town Counsel, therefore the Board of Selectmen 
moved to dismiss it. The Planning Board was in favor 
of dismissal. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the location of the Salt Storage Shed, the 
purchase of which was authorized under Article 23 at 
the Annual Town Meeting held on May 5, 1975, be 
located on Town owned property. 

The Finance Committee opposed this article. Mr. 
McDermott felt a specific site should be made for the 
location of the salt shed. A vote was taken on the 
motion. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Chairman of the Library 
Building Committee Howard K. Moore moved that the 
Town vote to transfer $94,500.00 from the "Library 
Addition Account" to an account to be known as the 
"Land and Buildings Acquisition Fund for Town 
Library Purposes." 

Mr. Richard McDermott of the Finance Committee 
stated that this article should be taken up at the next 
annual Town Meeting. The Selectmen favored the 
article. A discussion followed with a clear presentation 
of the need given by Mr. Moore, Mrs. McCarthy, and 
Mr. Panceira. 

Mr. John Arenstam made a motion to stop debate. A 
2/3 vote required. It was so voted, unanimously. 

A vote was taken on the main motion under Article 4. 

It was so voted, by voice. 

Mr. Gerald House moved that Article 1 be recon- 
sidered. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Chairman of the Library 
Building Committee Howard K. Moore moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Library Building Com- 
mittee acting under the supervision of the Board of 
Selectmen to purchase for the sum of $75,000 ap- 
proximately 47,000 square feet of land with the 
buildings thereon, bounded on the south by the Adams 
Library site, on the east by Boston Road, on the north 
by land of Riney and on the west by land of Tevlin and 
Adams Avenue, and to expend the sum of $19,500 to 
renovate and equip the buildings thereon for library 
purposes. 

Mr. Richard McDermott stated the Finance Comm- 
mittee does not object to the voters choice. A vote was 
taken on the main motion. 

A 2/3 vote required. It was so voted unanimously. 

Mr. Leroy Fielding questioned the quorum. A count 
was taken, showing 245 voters present. The meeting 
was adjourned at 10:10 P.M. without another date 
because of lack of quorum. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
SEPTEMBER 22, 1975 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, S.S. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the Chelmsford High School 
Gymnasium on Monday, the twenty-second day of 
September, 1975 at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, 
then and there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, 
or otherwise, a flowage easement over certain lands 
adjoining Crystal Lake for the purpose of permitting 
the flooding of said lands up to an elevation of 122 feet 
above mean sea level and for the municipal purposes of 
public health, safety and/or conservation and more 
particularly over the land of Roland S. Doyle and 
Anastasia Doyle a flowage easement extending to a 
point 1 foot higher than the line of Crystal Lake as 
taken by the Town of Chelmsford by a taking dated 
November 30, 1970 and recorded in Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 1942, Page 689. The 
limit of said easement is shown on a "Property Plan of 
the Restoration of Crystal Lake", dated February 1975, 
by Fay, Spofford and Thorndike, Inc., the original of 
which is on file in the office of the Town Clerk of the 
Town of Chelmsford and a reduced copy of which is 
recorded in said Registry of Deeds in Book of Plans 
120, Plan 115; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen and 
Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, 
or otherwise a flowage easement over certain lands 
adjoining Crystal Lake for the purpose of permitting 
the flooding of said lands up to an elevation of 122 feet 
above mean sea level and for the municipal purposes of 
public health safety and/or conservation and more 
particularly over the land of James M. Doyle and 
Kathleen Doyle a flowage easement extending to a 
point 1 foot higher than the line of Crystal Lake as 
taken by the Town of Chelmsford by a taking dated 
November 30, 1970 and recorded in Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 1942, Page 689. The 
limit of said easement is shown on a "Property Plan of 
the Restoration of Crystal Lake", dated February, 1975 
by Fay, Spofford and Thorndike, Inc., the original of 
which is on file in the office of the Town Clerk of the 
Town of Chelmsford and a reduced copy of which is 
recorded in said Registry of Deeds in Book of Plans 
120, Plan 115: or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen and 
Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the filing of the following petition in the General Court 
under the provisions of the Constitution of the Com- 



monwealth of Massachusetts Amendment Article 2, 
Section 8: 

"The voters of the Town of Chelmsford pursuant 
to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Amendment Article 2, Section 8, 
hereby petition the General Court of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts to enact the 
following law: 

Section I Notwithstanding any special or general 
law to the contrary, in order to ascertain the will 
of the voters of the Town of Chelmsford the 
Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford shall cause 
to be placed on the official ballot to be used in the 
Town of Chelmsford by the registered voters of 
said town at the next annual town meeting, the 
following question: 

"Shall the Town of Chelmsford participate in the 
METCO program or any other similar school 
busing program?" 

Whether or not a majority of the votes cast in 
answer to said questions is in the affirmative or 
negative, the result of such vote shall not be 
deemed to be binding upon the Selectmen and 
other officers of said town. 

Section II This act shall take effect upon its 
passage.": 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds a certain sum of money for the 
purchase of a traffic counter and paint striper, the 
cost of which will be 100% reimbursable to the Town; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a 
Bylaw to establish criteria and procedures for the 
recall of an elected officer of the Town: said Bylaw to 
read as follows: 

1. An elected officer of the Town, provided that he 
has had his office for at least six months, may be 
removed from public office by the following procedure. 
Any voter of the Town may file with the Town Clerk a 
petition containing the name and title of the elected 
officer whose removal is sought together with a 
statement of the reasons for his removal. The petition 
shall be signed in ink or indelible pencil by qualified 
voters of the Town equal in number to at least two per 
cent of the voters registered in the Town at the last 
annual town election. Said petition shall be ac- 
companied by affidavits signed and sworn by each 
circulator. 

2. Within five days following receipt of the petition 
the Town Clerk shall determine whether the petition 
and the affidavits are sufficient, and if sufficient, a 
recall vote shall be taken within ninety days, but not 
sooner than sixty days, following such determination. 
However, no such vote shall be taken if the term of 
office of such elected official shall expire within ninety 
days after the recall vote, or if such elected officer 
shall resign from office before the taking of the vote. 
Said recall vote shall be called and conducted in the 
same manner as is provided by General Laws for the 
call and conduct of a special election. 



3. The form of the question to be voted upon shall be 
substantially as follows: "Shall (here insert the name 
and title of the elected officer whose recall is sought) 
be removed from office?" A majority vote to recall 
shall not be effective unless at least thirty per cent of 
the voters entitled to vote on the question shall have 
voted. Recall of such elected officer shall become 
effective upon certification of the results of the voting 
regardless of any defect in the recall petition. If any 
elected officer shall be recalled, the vacancy created 
thereby shall be filled in accordance with the 
provisions of General Law, this Chapter and Bylaw: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a 
Bylaw to establish criteria for conflicts of interest by 
Town officers, employees and appointed members of 
Town committees: said Bylaw to read as follows: 

1. All Town officials shall conduct themselves with 
competence and the highest ethical conduct for the 
benefit of the majority of the taxpayers in matters 
directly affecting their office. 

2. All Town officers, employees and voting appointed 
committee members shall perform the duties and 
responsibilities of their office without conflicts of 
financial interests. 

3. No Town officer or voting appointed committee 
member shall serve on any Town agency nor exercise 
his/her vote on such an agency or committee if said act 
would directly affect the income of a) that Town of- 
ficer, b) any member of the officer's immediate 
family, or c) a business associate of the Town officer. 

4. No Town officer or voting appointed committee 
member shall exercise his vote on any Town agency if 
that vote directly affects an issue involving an area in 
which he holds professional competence or is employed 
gainfully. 

5. The submission of a bid by any Town officer, 
employee or committee member to the Town for any 
materials or services shall serve to cause an im- 
mediate vacating of his office. 

6. No elected Town officer or voting appointed 
member of a Town committee shall become a Town 
employee in the field of the subject matter of his/her 
appointment within four (4) years of the termination of 
the term of office or appointment. 

7. Any group of ten (10) registered voters may bring 
to the Town Counsel a request to investigate an alleged 
violation of this Bylaw. The Town Counsel shall notify 
the person accused of the allegation and request 
vacating of the office. If the person accused elects to 
vacate the office, all allegations will be dropped by the 
Town : if not, then the Counsel shall proceed with a civil 
suit for vacating the office. 

8. Any Town officer, elected or appointed, shall upon 
conviction under this conflict of interest Bylaw pay to 
the Town Treasurer an amount equal to 1.5 times the 
amount of the financial benefit received by the officer, 
member of his immediate family or his business 
associate. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



AND YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED TO SERVE 
this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the 
McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, North 
Elementary School Auditorium, Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room, East Chelmsford 
School, Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School 
Cafeteria, North Elementary School Auditorium, 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High 
School, South Row School Auditorium, South Row 
School Auditorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, and 
Fire House — Old Westford Road seven days at least 
before the time appointed for holding this meeting 
aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of the 
Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at 
the time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS this 8th day of Sep- 
tember 1975. 

S/ Arnold J. Lovering 
S/ Paul C. Hart S/ Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

S/ William R. Murphy S/ Philip P. Currier 



Selectman William Murphy presented plaques to two 
A.F.S. students, Soledad Henriquez from the Town of 
Tegucigalpa, Honduras and Ghislaine Rigoreau from 
the Town of Montmorency, France, and welcomed 
them to the Town of Chelmsford. 

Mr. Lovering moved to dismiss Article 1. It was so 
voted, unanimously. 

Mr. Lovering moved to dismiss Article 2. It was so 
voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to approve the filing of the 
following petition in the General Court under the 
provisions of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Amendment Article 2, Section 8: 

"The voters of the Town of Chelmsford, pursuant to 
the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Amendment Article 2, Section 8, 
hereby petition the General Court of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts to enact the following 
law: 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 1975 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Colonel Moses 
Parker Junior High School Band Room, East 
Chelmsford School, Byam School Cafetorium, 
Westlands School Cafeteria, North Elementary School 
Auditorium, Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 
Junior High School, South Row School Auditorium, 
South Row School Auditorium, Westlands School 
Cafeteria, and Fire House — Old Westford Road seven 
days at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

S/ William E.Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

September 10, 1975 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
SEPTEMBER 22, 1975 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7 : 45 
P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 642 
voters present. 



The following tellers were appointed: 



Richard Lahue 
Christy Pettee 
Elizabeth Marshall 



Edward Hilliard 
Paul Bienvenu 
Ruth Delaney 



Selectman Arnold J. Lovering moved that the 
Sheriff's return of service of posting of the warrant be 
accepted. It was so voted, unanimously. The 
Moderator moved that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. It was so voted. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering on behalf of the Board of 
Selectmen presented to Park Superintendent Donald 
E. Gray a plaque to honor his appointment as out- 
standing municipal employee of the Town for this year. 



Section I Notwithstanding any special or general law 
to the contrary, in order to ascertain the will of the 
voters of the Town of Chelmsford, the Selectmen of the 
Town of Chelmsford shall cause to be placed on the 
official ballot to be used in the Town of Chelmsford by 
the registered voters of said town at the next annual 
town meeting, the following question: 



"Shall the Town of Chelmsford participate in the 
METCO program or any other similar school 
busing program?" 



Whether or not a majority of the votes cast in answer 
to said question is in the affirmative or negative, the 
result of such vote shall not be deemed to be binding 
upon the Selectmen and other officers of said town. 

Section II This act shall take effect upon its 
passage." 

Selectman Arnold Lovering stated that the Board of 
Selectmen supports this article. Chairman of the 
Finance Committee Marvin Schenk stated that the 
Finance Committee recommends this article. Mr. 
Norman Douglas questioned whether this particular 
vote would be binding upon the School Committee. 
Selectman Arnold Lovering responded that the vote 
would not be binding. 

Mrs. Ina Greenblatt stated there is a possibility that 
this could be a binding referendum. Mr. Robert Hall of 
the School Committee stated he hopes the School 
Committee will weigh the will of the people very 
carefully. 

A vote was taken on the main motion under Article 3. 
It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Selectman Arnold J. Lovering 
moved that the Town vote to transfer from available 
funds the sum of $4,860.00 for the purchase of a traffic 
counter and paint striper, the cost of which will be 
100% reimbursable to the Town. 

The Selectmen supported this article. The Finance 
Committee also recommended the article. It was so 
voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 5. Mr. Jean-Paul J. Gravell 
moved that the Town vote to adopt a Bylaw to establish 
criteria and procedures for the recall of an elected 
officer of the Town : said Bylaw to read as follows : 

1. An elected officer of the Town, provided that he 
has had his office for at least six months, may be 
removed from public office by the following procedure. 
Any voter of the Town may file with the Town Clerk a 
petition containing the name and title of the elected 
officer whose removal is sought, together with a 
statement of the reasons for his removal. The petition 
shall be signed in ink or indelible pencil by qualified 
voters of the Town equal in number to at least two per 
cent of the voters registered in the Town at the last 
annual town election. Said petition shall be ac- 
companied by affidavits signed and sworn by each 
circulator. 

2. Within five days following receipt of the petition 
the Town Clerk shall determine whether the petition 
and the affidavits are sufficient, and if sufficient, a 
recall vote shall be taken within ninety days, but not 
sooner than sixty days, following such determination. 
However, no such vote shall be taken if the term of 
office of such elected official shall expire within ninety 
days after the recall vote, or if such elected officer 
shall resign from office before the taking of the vote. 
Said recall vote shall be called and conducted in the 
same manner as is provided by General Laws for the 
call and conduct of a special election. 

3. The form of the question to be voted upon shall be 
substantially as follows: "Shall (here insertthe name 
and title of the elected officer whose recall is sought) 
be removed from office?" A majority vote to recall 
shall not be effective unless at least thirty per cent of 
the voters entitled to vote on the question shall have 
voted. Recall of such elected officer shall become 
effective upon certification of the results of the voting 
regardless of any defect in the recall petition. If any 
elected officer shall be recalled, the vacancy created 
thereby shall be filled in accordance with the 
provisions of General Law, this Chapter, and Bylaw. 

Mr. Gravell moved to amend Section i to change the 
2% figure to read 40%. The Board of Selectmen sup- 
ported this amendment. The Finance Committee 
opposed it. Mr. Schenk stated it would be more ap- 
propriate to consider an article of this type at a regular 
town meeting. 

A vote was taken on the motion to amend. Motion 
defeated. 

Mr. Gordon Reed moved to reconsider the amend- 
ment. Motion carried. 

Mr. Edward Hilliard moved to amend Section 1 to 
read 10% of the voters registered. Mr. Gravell with- 
drew his motion for 40%. 

A vote was taken on Mr. Hilliard's motion to amend 
Section 1 to 10% of the voters registered. Motion 
carried. 

After a lengthy discussion a vote was taken on the 
main motion as amended. Motion carried. 

Section 1 under Article 5 now reads: 

1. An elected officer of the Town, provided that he 



has had his office for at least six months, may be 
removed from public office by the following procedure. 
Any voter of the Town may file with the Town Clerk a 
petition containing the name and title of the elected 
officer whose removal is sought, together with a 
statement of the reasons for his removal. The petition 
shall be signed in ink or indelible pencil by qualified 
voters of the Town equal in number to at least ten per 
cent of the voters registered in the Town at the last 
annual town election. Said petition shall be ac- 
companied by affidavits signed and sworn by each 
circulator. (This article was disapproved by the Att't. 
Gen. on December 1, 1975, result: this is not a town 
bylaw. ) 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Mr. Arnold Lovering stated 
that the Selectmen are concerned about the legality of 
this article, and recommended dismissal with the 
stipulation it be turned over to the Home Rule Advisory 
Committee for further study. The Finance Committee 
agreed with the Selectmen's motion for dismissal and 
recommendation for Home Rule study. Mr. Gravell 
agreed with the Selectmen and Finance Committee. A 
vote was taken on the motion for dismissal with the 
stipulation the article be studied by the Home Rule 
Advisory Committee. 

It was so voted unanimously. 

Mr. Lovering moved for adjournment sine die at 9:05 
P.M. It was so voted. 



DanielJ. Coughlin, 
Moderator 



Mary E.St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



TOWN WARRANT FOR SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY 
NOVEMBER 18, 1975 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 



Precinct 4. 
Precinct 11. 



East Chelmsford School 
Westlands School Library 



On Tuesday, the 18th day of November, 1975, being 
the third Tuesday in said month, at 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 
P.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
nomination of candidates for political parties for the 
following office: 

REPRESENTATIVE IN 
GENERAL COURT 47th Representative District 

Precincts 4 and 11 only 

The polls will be open from 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 



AND YOU ARE DIRECTED TO SERVE this 
Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the East 
Chelmsford School and the Westlands School Library 
at least seven days before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of this 
Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at 
the time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS this 10th day of 
November, 1975. 

S/ Arnold J. Lovering 
S/ Paul C.Hart Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

S/ William R. Murphy S/ Philip L. Currier 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



November 10, 1975 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: East Chelmsford School and the 
Westlands School Library, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/ William E.Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 
11-10-75 

A true copy, Attest: 
S/ William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

RESULTS OF SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY 

DEMOCRATIC 

SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY ELECTION 

November 18. 1975 



Representative in Genen 


j\ Court 


47th Middlesex District 




(To Fill Vacancy) 


Prec. Pi 
4 


Thomas P. Dougherty 


23 


Francis A. Gendreau 


6 


Stephen J. Hartigan 


3 


Edward A. LeLacheur 


49 


Thomas P. Machado 


17 


Gerald J. Mahoney 


6 


John J. McNulty 


185 


Anthony Medeiros 


31 


Mary Gath Murphy 


1 


George F Pilato 





Daniel E. Reynolds 


1 


Write-In 





Blanks 


1 


TOTAL 


323 




REPUBLICAN 


SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY ELECTION 


NOVEMBER 18. 1975 


Representative in Genei 


al Court Prec. F 


47th Middlesex District 


4 


(To Fill Vacancy) 




John J. McNulty (Write-I 


n) 26 


Edward A. LeLacheur (W 


rile-In) 1 


Stephen J. Hartigan (Wr 


ite-ln) 1 


Anthony Medeiros (Writ 


e-ln) 3 


Thomas P. Machado (Wr 


ite-ln) 4 


Thomas P. Dougherty (Write-in) 1 


McDonough (Write-in) 




Gendreau (Write-in) 


2 


Mahoney (Write-in) 


2 


Blanks 


9 


TOTAL 


49 



AMERICAN PARTY 

SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 18. 1975 



Representative in General Coui 
47th Middlesex District 
(To Fill Vacancy) 

Thomas P. Machado (Write-In) 
Edward A. LeLacheur (Write-in) 
John J. McNulty (Write-In) 
Anthony Medeiros (Write-in) 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 

DECEMBER 16, 1975 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 

viz: 



Precinct 4. 
Precinct 11. 



East Chelmsford School 
Westlands School Library 



On Tuesday, the 16th day of December, 1975, being 
the third Tuesday in said month, at 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 
P.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Officers for the election 
of candidates for political parties for the following 
office: 

REPRESENTATIVE IN 
GENERAL COURT 47th Representative District 

Precincts 4 and 11 only 

The polls will be open from 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

AND YOU ARE DIRECTED TO SERVE this 
Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the East 
Chelmsford School and the Westlands School Library 
at least seven days before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of this 
Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at 
the time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS this 4th day of 
December, 1975. 

S/ Paul C.Hart Arnold J. Lovering 

S/ William R. Murphy Philip L. Currier 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



December 5, 1975 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 

warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 

posting up attested copies of same at the following 

places, to wit: East Chelmsford School and the 

Westlands School Library, seven days at least before 

the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/ William E.Spence 

Constable of Chelmsford 

December 5, 1975 

A True copy, Attest: 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: East Chelmsford School and the 
Westlands School Library, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 
S/ William E.Spence 



Constable of Chelmsford 



December 5, 1975 
A true copy, Attest: 
S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



RESULTS OF SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 
DECEMBER 16, 1975 

Representative in General Coui I Hiei l'iec I 

47th Middlesex District 4 M 

(To Fill Vacancy! 



Edward A. LeLacheui 
John James Burgoyn 
Blanks 
Total 



103 



46 



149 



39 8 47 

1 1 

142 55 197 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



DECEMBER 17, 1975 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the C. Edith McCarthy 
Junior High School Auditorium on Wednesday, the 
seventeenth day of December, 1975 at 7:30 p.m. o'clock 
in the evening, then and there to act upon the following 
articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds and/or the Reserve Fund certain 
sums of money to the following named accounts in the 
Cemetery Department: 

1. General Labor Account: 

2. Special Labor for Lot Owners Account: 

3. Interments Account: 
or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds and/or the Reserve Fund certain 
sums of money to the following named accounts in the 
Highway Department: 

1. Waste Collection Account: 

2. Annual Cleanup Days Account: 

3. Labor - Men Account: 

4. Vacation and Sickness Account: 

5. Labor Overtime Account: 

6. Snow and Ice Account: 

7. Highway, Bridges, and Drainage Construction 
Account: 

or act in relation thereto. 

AND YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED TO SERVE 
this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the 
McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, North 
Elementary School Auditorium, Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room, East Chelmsford 
School, Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School 
Cafeteria, North Elementary School Auditorium, 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High 
School, South Row School Auditorium, South Row 
School Auditorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, and 
Fire House — Old Westford Road seven days at least 
before the time appointed for holding this meeting 
aforesaid. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT and make return of the 
Warrant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at 
the time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 



GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS THIS 9th day of 
December, 1975. 

S/ Arnold J. Lovering 
S/ Paul C. Hart S/ Thomas C. Palmer, Jr. 

S/ William R. Murphy S/ Philip L. Currier 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



December 10, 1975 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of the same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School — All Purpose Room, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Colonel Moses 
Parker Junior High School Band Room, East 
Chelmsford School, Byam School Cafetorium. 
Westlands School Cafeteria, North Elementary School 
Auditorium, Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 
Junior High School, South Row School Auditorium, 
South Row School Auditorium, Westlands School 
Cafeteria, and Fire House — Old Westford Road seven 
days at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

S/ William E.Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

DECEMBER 17, 1975 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. 

Selectman Arnold Lovering moved the reading of the 
Constable's return of the warrant be waived. It was so 
moved, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Mr. Arnold J. Lovering moved 
that the following sums be transferred from the 
Reserve Fund to the following named Cemetery 
Department Accounts: 

1. General Labor Account: $6,113.38 

2. Special Labor for Lot Owners Account: 

3. Intermittent Account: 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Mr. Arnold J. Lovering moved 
that the following sums be transferred from the 
Reserve Fund to the following named Highway 
Department accounts: 

1. Waste Collection Account: $12,618.20 

2. Annual Cleanup Days Account : 539.00 

3. Labor -Men Account: 14,405.80 

4. Vacation and Sickness Account: 2,075.00 

5. Labor Overtime Account: 400.00 

6. Snow and Ice Account: 1,825.00 

7. Highway, Bridges, and Drainage 
Construction Account: 597.00 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

Mr. Arnold Lovering moved to adjourn at 7:42 P.M. 
It was so voted. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, 
Moderator 



Mary E.St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 




The members of 
THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



George A. Ripsom, Chairman 



William J. Reynolds, Vice Chairman 
Carol C. Cleven, Secretary 



Joan M. McHugh, High School Student Member 
Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent 



Robert D.Hall 
Rev. Harry A. Foster 







Non- 








Year 


Teachers 


Teachers ] 


Budget 2 


Expenditures 2 


Enrollment 


1970 


474 


256 


$ 6,416,116 


$ 6,200,184 


8,755 


1971 


486 


260 


7,296,850 


7,070,708 


9,002 


1972 


497 


273 


8,305,023 


8,090,812 


8,990 


1973 


512 


296 


14,767,1123 


14,328,428 


9,059 


1974 


548 


324 


10,660,533 


10,532,793 


9,627 


1975-76 


553 


331 


11,294,467 


4 


9,555 



1 Includes Part Time Personnel 

2 Includes Federal Funds 

3 Eighteen Month Budget (1/1/73 - 6/30/74) 

4 Not Finalized until 6/30/76 



During the year 1975 a significant amount of School 
Committee and staff energy was devoted to the ar- 
ticulation of goals for the school system and 
clarification of objectives of school programs. At the 
base of these activities has been: (1) the desire to 
establish standards against which the performance of 
individual children and the system could be measured. 
The goal: To organize and develop the thought and 
skills of students so that not only within but outside the 
school and beyond the years of formal education they 
will choose to live healthy lives characterized by 
reflection, intervention, rational inquiry, and 
judgment; (2) the desire to make the best use of the tax 
dollar to help the school system serve better than ever 
the children and parents of the community. The goal: 
To weigh the educational priorities for students' needs 
against the soaring costs of necessary non-educational 
expenses. 

In this year of economic stress, the School Com- 
mittee, Administration, and staff are especially 
mindful of the effect of the school budget on the citizens 
of the community. Budget considerations were most 



time consuming. The tension between increasing 
educational expectations and the difficulties of 
financing them provided the background for many of 
the issues and events during the past year. 

Every September between six and seven hundred 
children enter Kindergarten. These chila-en bring to 
the classroom a whole series of varying abilities in 
language, basic counting, art, music, and physical 
movement. Each child is a unique and different blend 
of abilities and experiences. The old assumption that 
students can be grouped by age and taught in standard 
size groups by one teacher does not provide the 
flexibility or richness of talent necessary to meet the 
needs of students. Each year the Chelmsford Schools 
do improve in understanding and dealing with the 
differences in children. However, each year there is an 
increase in the expectation of parents, community 
aspirations, new state requirements, and the challenge 
to the staff itself in dealing with differences among 
children. The concern of the School Committee is 
providing the resources to deal with differences among 
children resulted in the formation of an Ad Hoc 



Committee of administrators, teachers, and parents to 
explore and design an implementation plan for the 
purpose of facilitating alternative program offerings 
for elementary children in the school system. This Ad 
Hoc Committee has been collecting data and meeting 
regularly to finalize their report which is scheduled for 
late Spring 1976. 

In addition to this committee, the School Committee 
established in the Spring of this year an Ad Hoc 
Committee to evaluate the school system's testing 
program. The function of this Ad Hoc Committee was: 
(1) to evaluate the present school testing program; (2) 
to reveal the extent to which the school testing 
program actually achieved the purpose for which it 
was designed and the reasons for any failure to attain 
its goal; (3) to make recommendations relevant to the 
school testing program becoming a more effective 
technique for critically judging the worth of whatever 
the schools teach and the effectiveness and efficiency 
of their method of instruction. This Committee has met 
regularly during the 1975 school year and will submit 
its report to the School Committee in January 1976. 

The modified open enrollment policy which provides 
parents with the opportunity to enroll their children in 
an elementary school outside their school attendance 
district was continued this year. Thirty-five children 
were transferred to schools outside of their attendance 
district under this policy in 1975. This number is an 
increase of ten from 1974 when the policy was initiated, 
and twenty-five children were transferred. 

As predicted in last year's annual report, the East 
and Quessy Elementary Schools were closed in Sep- 
tember because of the declining elementary 
enrollment. This resulted in an estimated savings of 
$100,000 in the current school budget. A projected 
decline of upwards to 235 students in K-6 next Sep- 
tember will result in a need for five fewer classrooms 
system wide. This enrollment trend has caused the 
School Committee to direct the Administration to 
develop a long-range plan for school organization from 
Kindergarten through Grade 12, with back-up data 
showing educational and economic implications. 

Chapter 766 of the Acts of 1972 focused statewide and 
local attention to the needs of the handicapped child, 
those with specific learning disabilities, as well as 
other categories requiring special education. This law 
assigns to public school systems the responsibility for 
the education of all children aged 3 through 21 with 
special needs. 

The special needs student may have one or more of 
the following difficulties: problems in adjustment or 
attributes arising from intellectual, sensory, 
emotional, or physical factors; cerebral dysfunctions; 
perceptual factors or other specific learning 
disabilities. Under Chapter 766, a child with indications 
of a "special need" may be referred by parents or 
teachers for a "core evaluation" in which parents, 
teachers, and specialists meet to diagnose the child's 
learning difficulties and to develop a specific 
educational plan. The educational plan may be as 
simple as twice a week speech therapy, or, at the ex- 
treme, placement in a private, residential treatment 
center. In either instance, all expenses are borne by 
the Town. 

As of December 31, 1975, approximately 9.5 per cent 
of the total student population of Chelmsford was 
receiving supportive services within the Chelmsford 
School System. 



In order to facilitate referrals and the writing and 
implementation of educational plans, the Special 
Education Department has expanded its services for 
Chapter 766 students during the current school year. 
Three CORE evaluation team chairpersons were 
appointed, two to serve the elementary schools and one 
chairperson to serve the secondary schools. A full-time 
school psychologist was also appointed to serve on the 
CORE evaluation team. 

In order to reduce program costs, the Chelmsford 
School Department has joined with neighboring 
communities in a collaborative venture to develop 
programs for special needs students. This 
collaborative presently serves the needs of children 
with one or more of the following difficulties: 

1. visual impairment 

2. emotionally based problems 

3. substantially disabled and multihandicapped 

The Special Education Department, in conjunction 
with collaborative members, continues to explore and 
develop new programs for children with special needs. 

Although Chapter 766 is a time-consuming, intensive, 
and costly process, it is expected to assure that each 
child receives the appropriate level of educational 
services, regardless of the special need. It is with a 
clear view of both benefits and costs that the Chelms- 
ford School Committee continues to give much time 
and thought to demands made upon its schools by 
Chapter 766, and to the possible limitations that public 
schools may eventually be forced to place upon ser- 
vices to children. Consequently, all programs of 
Special Education Services are closely monitored to 
the degree that time and available personnel permit. 

Curriculum development is an ever evolving 
process. For the past several years, the Annual Report 
has attempted to illustrate the dynamic quality of a 
curriculum, that by its very nature, is never complete. 
The year 1975 has witnessed a continuation of many 
facets of curriculum projects. Curriculum committees 
have raised or developed specific courses of study, 
with the intent of improving subject structure and 
levels of instruction. Interaction of people meeting 
together to review, to analyze, and to share ex- 
periences, has in the best sense provided a unique 
opportunity for improvement of the curriculum. In 
addition, in-service workshops have preceded changes 
and strengthened curriculum by involving staff 
members who are to be affected by curriculum 
changes. 

It is axiomatic that planning teaching strategies and 
materials to permit students to progress according to 
their needs is no easy task. Planning for and teaching 
individual students requires a commitment of effort 
and time far in excess of the normal school day. But 
learning is the primary function of the school, not 
teaching; and the following excerpts, taken from 
reports written by school personnel, will aid readers of 
this report to better understand some of the learning 
experiences children are having in our schools today. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

When a small group of hearty men and women of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony left the greater-Boston and 
Woburn area over 300 years ago and settled in the 
wilderness along the Merrimack River, they could 
never have imagined that this settlement would one 



day include over 30,000 people with almost one-third of 
them in the community's schools. Nor could these 
colonists have predicted that their settlement which 
became Chelmsford would be part of a new nation that 
would in 1975 begin its Bicentennial celebration. 

These colonists and the nation's Bicentennial were a 
major source of material for the Chelmsford Social 
Studies program in 1975. As Americans prepared for 
the re-creation of the events at Concord on April 19, 
Chelmsford students participated in a variety of 
functions. These ranged from a total school program 
with students and teachers in colonial costume at the 
Westlands School, to an extensive lecture and activity 
program dedicated to Bicentennial ideals at Chelms- 
ford High School. 

The second grade school visitation program at the 
Old Chelmsford Garrison House took on special 
meaning as children adopted Adams family names and 
simulated daily chores in colonial Chelmsford. Third 
graders examined the artifacts of Chelmsford's history 
at the Barrett Byam Homestead. Eighth grade 
students in American history classes conducted field 
study at the Garrison House and concentrated on 
colonial ingenuity and resourcefulness in food 
preparation and textile production. All three programs 
made the Bicentennial much more meaningful than 
would classroom experiences alone. 

The Bicentennial even influenced the schools' ob- 
servation of United Nations Day as children examined 
America's ethnic heritage and the nation's willingness 
to aid others through international agencies such as 
UNICEF. 

Bicentennial observances within the schools con- 
tinue in 1976. 

Curriculum development during 1975 was con- 
centrated at three levels. The Kindergarten program 
began working with readiness activities in Social 
Studies. Junior High School teachers worked during 
the summer to develop detailed teacher resource 
guides for their American history and political science 
courses and a revised concluding unit for their "People 
and Society" course. The contribution of computerized 
data and data retrieval systems in history and social 
science were the basis for initiating certain in- 
terdisciplinary work in mathematics and social studies 
at Chelmsford High School. 

Truly it may be said that, throughout the year, much 
progress was made as an exceptional group of teachers 
strove to prepare their students for intelligent par- 
ticipation in the free society whose origins Americans 
commemorate during the Bicentennial. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF SCIENCE 

The study of science today is a continuing and varied 
process involving a developing body of facts and 
general laws which are interrelated with all phases of 
man and his society. Some of the major objectives of 
the sequential science program are to achieve an 
awareness of generalizable intellectual skills and to 
acquire knowledge of scientific procedures (ob- 
servation, classification, measurement, and others) 
for gaining new knowledge, as well as to develop the 
ability to apply a scientific mode of thought to a wide 
range of problems in the social and environmental 
areas. 



Science Curriculum Improvement Study (or SCIS), a 
National Science Foundation curriculum established in 
1962, is now fully implemented at the elementary level. 
The SCIS Kindergarten program, "Beginnings," offers 
the young child a wide variety of experiences in the life 
and physical sciences. These experiences contribute to 
language development and to a growing understanding 
of science through exploration, invention, and 
discovery. A method of evaluating basic science skills 
at the Grade 6 level of SCIS is currently being in- 
vestigated with a projected implementation by 1977. 

The science program at the McCarthy and Parker 
Junior High Schools is laboratory experience oriented. 
The Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) 
program is now being used in Grades 7, 8, and 9. The 
instructional approach of ISCS allows each student to 
work at his own pace with basic concepts in a variety of 
subject areas. Traditional course offerings in life, 
earth, and physical science provide students with an 
alternative to individualized instruction. A curriculum 
workshop for Junior High science staff was held prior 
to the opening of school for the development and 
construction of a test to be given to all Grade 9 students 
for the purpose of evaluating science skills acquired in 
Grades 7, 8, and 9. 

At the High School level, science curriculum of- 
ferings are highly inquiry oriented with a major em- 
phasis on the laboratory program. Understanding and 
basic skills are developed in biology at Grade 10, 
chemistry at Grade 11, and physics at Grade 12. 

Classes in anatomy and clinical techniques have 
shown increased enrollment due to the current interest 
in the health sciences and an awareness of the variety 
of careers available in health allied fields. 

The physics program has been redesigned using the 
Keller Plan as a basis for instruction. Students achieve 
mastery of material at varying rates. Laboratory 
experiences are an integral part of the mastery 
sequence. 

Advanced chemistry is a highly individualized 
program using modular packages consisting of textual 
material, required as well as optional experiments, 
and a rigorous testing program. 

The present school year has seen increased 
utilization of the darkroom and photographic facilities 
at the High School. A one semester course in 
photographic theory, composition and manipulative 
skills offers an opportunity to students of all abilities to 
investigate photography as a career as well as a 
leisure experience. 

The Chelmsford Science Program is attempting to 
educate the future student of science as well as the non- 
scientist who will experience a need for ever in- 
creasing scientific literacy in order to evaluate daily 
problems of our technologically complex society. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF CAREER EDUCATION 

The Career Education Department of the Chelms- 
ford School System encompasses the areas of Career 
Education, Business Education, Home Economics, 
Industrial Arts, and Work Experience. 

The School Committee implemented two new 
programs in the Industrial Arts and Home Economics 
Departments. These programs were developed for the 



students in the 7th Grade. It was the feeling of the 
School Committee that Career Education should 
become a vital part of the students' education at an 
early date. In the past, a student did not have an op- 
portunity to experience many of the occupational 
clusters that are recommended by the United States 
Office of Education at the 7th Grade level. This earlier 
offering of career exploration will help students decide 
with more assurance what careers they would like to 
explore for possible future study at the secondary 
school level either at Chelmsford High School or at 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School. 

The programs at the two Junior High Schools are the 
same. 

This is the age in which many students start their 
formal introduction into the working world. The 7th 
Grade Home Economics program allows students to 
explore some of the careers which will be meaningful 
to them later in life. These might include the health 
services, social services, recreational services, or 
others. 

Our curriculum in Home Economics is based on the 
study of personal relationships, child care, and the 
introduction of foods and nutrition study. A very im- 
portant adjunct of the 7th Grade program is the un- 
derstanding about the physical, social, and emotional 
development of young children as related to 
babysitting. 

The program in Industrial Arts is based on a 
nationally recognized program for exploring the world 
of construction. Students are introduced to the basic 
methods and techniques required to build any struc- 
ture, whether it be a road, dam, building, tower, or 
tunnel. These concepts are presented through 
simulation which is the basis for our Industrial Arts 
curriculum - Grades seven through twelve. Students 
simulate a topographical survey, study actual 
blueprints, and write specifications for estimating 
building cost. 

The students next undertake to bid a construction job 
just as a contractor would do. Personnel management 
is a role played when they interview and hire for 
specific jobs for the construction job. Actual con- 
struction experience is gained by learning how to 
locate foundations, footing constructions, and block 
laying, as well as by building a modular model house of 
wood frame construction. Finally, students combine 
their knowledge of construction technology to effect a 
city and regional planning model. 

The School Committee continues to demonstrate its 
concern for the best possible education of our students 
by supporting the Career Education Department. The 
fastest moving curriculum in today's education is 
Career Education, and Chelmsford once again can be 
proud of its accomplishments in this education 
structure. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF ART 

The Art Department has two critical objectives - 
first, to make each student aware of the visual world in 
which he lives; and secondly, to make each student 
aware of his own skills and manipulate capabilities. 
These goals are very broad, and to attempt to ac- 
complish them requires constant attention on the part 
of the staff. 



How do we attempt to achieve these objectives? 
Awareness of one's world is a very non-tangible 
element. We talk, we touch stones, we show films and 
slides, we study architecture, we look at shells as well 
as statues, we talk about styles, and we try to get in- 
volved with as many forms of design in our visual and 
sensory world as possible. We attempt to show that our 
visual world, both natural and man-made, must not be 
taken for granted; but rather, it must be understood, 
appreciated, and cherished. Hopefully, from this form 
of understanding will develop a life-long attitude for 
our world and one that will encourage caring and 
discretion among our younger citizens. 

The Art Department has worked with numerous 
classes on various Bicentennial projects and has un- 
dertaken several projects within the community. One 
such project was for some High School students to 
paint the fire hydrants in Chelmsford Center under the 
sponsorship of one of the local Garden Clubs (and to 
our delight the idea quickly spread to many of our 
neighboring communities). Another project was un- 
dertaken by some students at McCarthy Junior High, 
and they have created a Bicentennial mural in the 
Chelmsford Mall. We are very pleased with this type of 
activity, not only because it is important for the school 
and the community to work together, but even more 
because it is one of the more realistic ways that a 
student can do something for Chelmsford . . his town! 

Academically, our educational plan is developed so 
that the goals and objectives for each grade level are 
steps on which to build in the following years, while at 
the same time dwelling on the growth and development 
of each child at each grade level. We try to give every 
student in our schools a total Art experience by of- 
fering as many forms of media, ideas, and challenges 
as possible. 

In keeping with the contemporary trends and the 
growing interest in our native arts and crafts, we find 
that more and more of our staff is getting involved with 
quilting, hooking, stitchery, and such activities. This is 
evident in every school from Kindergarten classes 
through the High School studios. We consider this to be 
very meaningful in an academic sense because all of 
the craft areas offer the greatest potential for 
developing visual and manipulative skills. Through 
this type of activity, many other academic areas can 
be integrated and enhanced. 

There are still many hundreds of hours spent in 
painting, color study, printmaking, lettering, per- 
spective, and in other more traditional Art areas. 

In summation, we feel that our students are offered 
an art education of very broad scope which can help 
each one develop more fully mentally, physically, and 
sensorally into responsive and responsible citizens. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 

The purpose of music education in the schools of 
Chelmsford is to assist students to appreciate, un- 
derstand, participate, and respond with sensitivity to 
the aesthetic effect of music, according to their in- 
dividual capacities. 

The Music Department is committed to excellence in 
music at all levels and strives to help students discover 
and develop their musical talents for better un- 
derstanding and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 



Each school has two programs: vocal/academic and 
instrumental. A vocal/academic program is required 
through Grade eight and elective in nine through 
twelve. The instrumental program is elective with 
strings starting in Grade three and band instruments 
starting in Grade six. 

All schools have performing ensembles ranging from 
choral, recorder, song flute, and guitar to orchestra 
and band. These ensembles are active in performing at 
school assemblies, concerts, and community 
programs. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE 

This year the Foreign Language Department is 
pleased to announce a gain of 162 in student 
enrollments at the High School. This compares with an 
increase of only 142 in total enrollment at the High 
School. We believe this phenomenon is attributable to 
greater student awareness of the relevance of foreign 
languages to careers, increasing enrollments in ad- 
vanced courses, and a curriculum more responsive to 
students' needs and wants. 

Several departmental policies and actions con- 
tributed to these happy results. First, the department 
sought last year to arrest the decline in foreign 
language enrollments by mounting at the Senior and 
Junior Highs an aggressive recruitment campaign 
which focused on demonstrating a strong link between 
foreign language competence and job opportunity. 
This year the department is continuing this tactic with 
the added dimension of a classroom instruction unit in 
Foreign Language Career Education. 

Second, the department began last year and con- 
tinues this year to adopt specialized listening com- 
prehension units of instruction for each course of each 
level in order to establish well the listening skill. This is 
in response to recent foreign language educational 
research which has established the primacy of the 
listening skill as the foundation upon which all sub- 
sequent language skills are built. In this regard, also, 
new audio- lingual visual materials are being tested in 
the Grade 7 French course for general adoption. These 
new materials strongly emphasize the listening skill as 
a prerequisite to all language learning. 

Third, the department attempted to be more 
responsive to student needs by abandoning the com- 
prehensive French IV course in favor of a series of 
semester skills and culture-oriented elective courses. 
Instead of assuming that all students at the advanced 
level have uniform needs and interests, the elective 
system attempts to cater to specialized areas of 
development. Students may elect such courses as 
Intensive Grammar Review, Advanced Conversation, 
French Cuisine, Taking a Look at French Canada, 
Modern Short Story, etc. Because of favorable student 
reaction, the department plans to continue the elective 
program into the next academic year. 

Lastly, the department has organized again this year 
its Spanish Tutorial Program. Under this plan, ad- 
vanced Spanish students from Chelmsford High spend 
one afternoon a week in a Lowell elementary school to 
relate with Spanish speaking students in activities such 
as crafts, sports, and games. In addition, several 
students have been assigned as in-class tutors of 
academic subjects to bilingual pupils needing extra or 
remedial help. Both concepts afford our students a 
practical opportunity to use and perfect their language 
skills while providing a community service. 



FROM THE COORDINATOR OF PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

Perhaps the year of 1975 can best be described by the 
words GROWTH and CHANGE. 

The new High School was opened in the Fall of 1974. 
This provided us with a facility with seven indoor 
teaching stations, twelve tennis courts, plenty of 
outdoor fields, and a new all-weather track. Our 
physical education offerings expanded considerably, 
with additional staff and facilities, into a very com- 
prehensive selective program. Approximately 2,000 
students, Grades 10 through 12, are housed in the High 
School. 

The old High School became McCarthy Junior High, 
and the former Junior High School was named Parker. 
The two Junior High Schools, Grades 7, 8 and 9, 
represented a change in our system. All of the sixth 
graders are housed in McFarlin School. This, of 
course, reduced the number of students in the 
elementary schools; and, for the first time in a number 
of years, every student has a gym for his/her physical 
education classes. 

Intramurals were offered at the elementary schools, 
and the response was great! These elective programs 
are running differently in all schools; McFarlin, 
McCarthy, and Parker Schools had great success with 
gymnastic intramurals followed by exhibitions for the 
parents. 

Two new laws, Title IX and Chapter 622, were 
enacted this past year. Both of these laws will have 
some impact on our programs in physical education, 
intramurals, and athletics. In November, the School 
Committee adopted a policy in support of these laws, 
and full implementation is coming this year. This will 
necessitate curriculum planning and, in some cases, 
revision of programs. 

The athletic program has developed into a very 
comprehensive one, with teams at both Junior Highs 
and new teams added at the High School. New sports 
begun in 1975 for girls are as follows: Volleyball, Cross 
Country, Gymnastics, Track, and Junior High School 
Softball and Track. For the boys, we added two new 
sports - Soccer and Gymnastics. 

Of course, now with two Junior High Schools, the 
number of teams has doubled at the Junior High level. 
No longer is Chelmsford a small school district; with 
over 9,000 students, we are larger than the Lexington, 
Winchester, or Wellesley Public School Districts. 

The support of the Boosters Club and entire com- 
munity has been a big help to our athletic program. 
The number of student participants (over 1,000) has 
nearly doubled in the past two years, and their en- 
thusiasm is contagious to all associated with the 
program. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF THE IN- 
STRUCTIONAL MEDIA CENTER 

The 1975 school year was the first year of full library 
services and facilities in all the Chelmsford elemen- 
tary schools. The greater availability and quantities of 
library materials at the elementary level is being 
reflected in the ability of the students in using all sorts 
of library materials. Instruction in library science is 
given in all elementary schools on the third grade 
level. In several libraries additional instruction is 
given by the library aides. A pilot program has been 



instituted at the McFarlin School in which instruction 
in the use of the reference collection is being given. 
Colorful chairs and tables now furnish the libraries at 
the Center, North, and South Row libraries. All the 
elementary libraries are the scene of frequent story 
hours given for the Kindergarten, first, second, and 
third grades. 

The closing of the East and Quessy schools 
necessitated the transfer of the library collections to 
other facilities. This was accomplished during the 
summer months. 8,473 items have been cataloged and 
processed by the Media Center staff for the elementary 
libraries. These were shipped from the Center to the 
individual schools ready for immediate circulation. 

As in past years, there has been a large group of 
volunteer mothers who go to the libraries to assist the 
aides. It would be difficult to give library services to 
the students without this able assistance. A tea in their 
honor was given in the Media Center at the High School 
in May. 

The elementary library program is administered by 
two professional librarians who carefully select new 
materials for the libraries, and implement the con- 
tinuing development of a library science curriculum. A 
series of six workshops for library aides was held to 
extend their knowledge and to increase their skills in 
assisting students and teachers. 

2,069 items were added to the McCarthy Library in 
1975, bringing that collection to a total of 5,781. This 
library is administered by a professional librarian who 
has trained over fifty students as library aides. An 
orientation program is given for the seventh grade 
students early in the school year. The librarian does all 
the materials selection for the McCarthy Library, 
gives group instruction and helps students and 
teachers in finding needed materials. 

A professional librarian is in charge of the Parker 
Junior High School Library. 472 items were added to 
this collection, bringing it to a total of 11,402. At the 
Parker, as at the McCarthy Library, students aides are 
trained by the librarian. Here again, the librarian 
gives instruction to students, helps teachers in 
acquiring needed materials, provides reserve book 
collections, and provides individual attention to 
students' needs. 

The High School Library has seen its use increased 
tremendously both by students and faculty. It houses a 
varied and valuable collection which includes 
periodicals, microfilm, microform, microfiche, sound 
filmstrips, film, and recordings, in addition to an in- 
creasing number of books in its collection. 8,116 items 
have been added to the collection during 1975, making a 
total of 12,650. 

The High School Library is administered by two 
professional librarians, assisted by two full-time and 
two part-time library aides. Teachers bring classes to 
the library for orientation and instruction by the 
librarians. The librarians have prepared over thirty 
bibliographies in various subject areas for the use of 
teachers and students. 

The centralization of processing and cataloging of all 
library materials in the Media Center office continues 
to be a tremendous help for all school libraries, sup- 
plying each one with materials immediately available 
to students. The professional cataloger facilitates the 



work flow and insures that there is consistency in 
cataloging. The cataloger and the small staff in the 
office have made available a total of 21,650 items to the 
various school libraries town-wide. 

The Media Technician had a busy schedule repairing 
and maintaining audio-visual equipment in all the 
schools. With the addition of another large school, the 
High School, to the system, the summer project of 
cleaning and repairing equipment in all the schools 
could not be completed, but the task was completed 
during the Christmas vacation. This year has seen the 
completion of a file which contains a card for each 
piece of equipment, identifying it by serial number and 
a Chelmsford identification number. A continuing 
record of repairs effected on any one piece of equip- 
ment is entered on that item's card. 

The GraphicArtist/Media Production Specialist and 
the Media Aide continue to spend much time in schools 
throughout the system. Slide tapes, audio tapes, 
videotapes, and films produced with their assistance 
better prepare students for larger scale and less 
supervised projects of their own using different 
communicative media. In conjunction with this goal of 
greater student expertise, the Graphic Artist has in- 
stituted a media club for sixth graders at the McFarlin 
School in which different media are dealt with in class 
projects. In addition, the Graphic Artist produces 
transparencies, posters, signs, and other illustrative 
materials. Many of the teachers, particularly at the 
elementary level, produce teaching aides which are 
sent to the Media Center for lamination, thus providing 
inexpensive and long-lasting materials which can be 
used by their students over a long period of time. 

The High School television studio became operative 
in May, 1975 and several hours of local programming 
were produced by English, Foreign Language, and 
Media Production classes. Since September, 
videotapes have been broadcast regularly from the 
studio to television sets in all classrooms. The High 
School's extensive collection of locally and com- 
mercially produced videotapes is being well and 
widely utilized. The studio and portable media 
production facilities continue to be used daily by 
several film, radio, and television production classes, 
and are available as needed to students and teachers in 
all disciplines. 

All these activities, efforts, and periods of instruction 
are put forth in an endeavor to support the philosophy 
of the Media Center: the development of basic com- 
munications skills, the effective use of knowledge, the 
nurture of creative interests and talents, and the 
provision of the capacity for lifelong learning. 

FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF THE McFARLIN 
SCHOOL 

To permit several basic considerations to be met, the 
organizational philosophy of the McFarlin School 
characterizes it as a "School of Alternatives." A basic 
consideration in the designation of the McFarlin School 
as the central Grade 6 school was a strong desire to 
maintain, as much as possible, the essential features of 
the elementary schools feeding students into the Grade 
6 complex. Such a consideration was essential in order 
to solidify and extend each student's program in 
preparation for the transition to the town's secondary 
schools. Coupled with this desire was the existence of 
the town's modified open enrollment policy which 
permitted parents to exercise an option in the choice of 
educational programs. In a central school, such as the 



McFarlin School, increased attention could be devoted 
to this concern given the presence of the total 
population of sixth-grade students and faculty. 

Recent research suggests additional basic concerns 
which must be considered in creating a "School of 
Alternatives." In attempting to create contemporary 
educational programs designed to meet most ef- 
fectively the needs of the individual's cognitive, af- 
fective, and psychomotor developmental patterns, 
definitive psychological assessment of the learning 
profile of individual students must be undertaken. 
Attention must be devoted to the methods of instruction 
by which individual students can learn best. In the 
program design at the McFarlin School, this con- 
sideration played a vital role in the structuring of 
alternative patterns. 

At the McFarlin School, students and teachers are 
organized into "clusters." These "clusters" range in 
size from 60 to 150 students working with two to five 
classroom teachers and a "cluster" of specialists in 
Art, Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Physical 
Education, Reading, Learning Disabilities, and 
Guidance. Additional specialists available to the 
student body include the Resource Room teacher and 
the Intercluster Teacher who provide concentrated 
individualized attention as the need exists. This 
"cluster" design permits the student entering the 
McFarlin School to identify closely with a given group 
of students and teachers, and it thus fosters the 
development of personalized working relationships. 

"Clusters," totaling eight in number, vary in their 
organization for instruction. In some clusters, children 
work in self-contained classrooms in which they work 
with one teacher and specialists, as needed, for the 
total school day. Team-teaching exists in other 
clusters. In this organization, children are deployed 
between/among several teachers during the course of 
the typical school day. 

"Clusters" also vary in the emphasis placed on 
traditional and open-concept teaching strategies. The 
staff feels that careful attention to these variations is 
essential in meeting the total needs of the student body. 

Curricular offerings at the McFarlin School are 
geared to consolidate and extend the offerings of the 
earlier elementary years. In the reading program, a 
combination approach is employed utilizing multi- 
basal materials to develop word recognition and 
comprehension skills. Paralleling this appraoch is the 
use of the language experience approach which focuses 
on the development of effective communicative skills. 
In many classrooms of the McFarlin School, an in- 
dividually prescribed reading program is employed. 

Consistent with the Chelmsford Language Arts 
Program, emphasis is placed in the McFarlin School 
on the students' writing experiences serving as the 
organizing strand for instruction in this area. A con- 
temporary language arts text series, which parallels a 
detailed Scope and Sequence Chart, is utilized, along 
with a multi-level spelling program geared to the 
individualization of instruction. Supplementary units 
in advertising, mythology, etymology, and poetry 
extend earlier experiences in sentence building, dic- 
tionary skills, and composition. 

A comprehensive intramural sports program is in 
operation. Interest in this offering is very strong 
among the students. Approximately 200 boys and 150 
girls are involved four afternoons per week in this 



program which emphasizes a variety of skills in the 
playing of competitive sports. Late buses provide 
transportation to all sections of the town following the 
intramural program. 

In the Spring of 1976, all students will have the op- 
portunity to spend one week at an environmental camp 
at Yarmouth, Mass. This program is designed to tie 
together many of the topics discussed in the science 
program. It will also provide students the opportunity 
to grow socially by presenting them many activities 
dealing with life skills and social behavior. 

As a "School of Alternatives," the McFarlin School 
attempts to provide options for students, parents, and 
teachers in the creation of multiple learning en- 
vironments. These options are consistent with the 
physical, social, and emotional development of its 
student body. 

FROM THE FOH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

In spite of all the strains and pressures of operating 
the new High School with construction on-going for 
several months, the educational experience of those at 
the High School was not adversely affected. Education 
is far more than bricks and mortar, but the new High 
School stands as a tribute to the faith and trust which 
the citizens of Chelmsford have in their young people. 
With sufficient space, excellent work areas, 
laboratories, shops, and an outstanding instructional 
media center, the new High School should provide an 
impetus to examine new and better ways of teaching 
and learning. 

A good portion of the year was spent in planning for 
the 1975-76 school year. There has been some 
discussion within the academic departments at the 
school about requirements for graduation and 
proficiency level requirements in reading, writing and 
mathematics prior to graduation. The discussions are 
continuing with the recommendations to be presented 
to the School Committee in the immediate future. 

There were several new features worthy of note 
introduced in September. Among these was a Service 
Study Program whereby a student's academic studies 
were complemented with a meaningful experience in 
the community - e.g. assisting in a swimming program 
for retarded youngsters at the Y.M.C.A. Another was 
the Career Information Center which opened in the 
Fall. This center, manned on a rotating basis by 
Guidance Counselors, contains information, materials, 
and audio-visual aides in hundreds of career op- 
portunities. It is an integral part of a career awareness 
philosophy being developed at the High School. Lastly, 
a monthly series in the Chelmsford Newsweekly called 
the Maroon and White was developed as a means of 
keeping the community abreast of developments at the 
High School. It has been successful as a vehicle of 
communication with parents and the community at 
large, so that they may better understand the com- 
plexity of the High School programs, activities and 
problems. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF 
GUIDANCE 

A concerted effort is underway on the secondary 
level to bring a balanced program of "careers" to 
students in the secondary schools. 

At both the McCarthy and Parker Junior High 
Schools, Career Centers are being established by the 
Counselors in those buildings. 



The Senior High School Center has been firmly 
established and is operational with all the necessary 
resources, including the computer service of Time 
Share, Inc., to allow students to seek answers to the 
question "What will I do after graduation?" 

An increasing number of recent graduates are using 
the Center. Residents who have career questions to be 
answered are invited to see the facility. 

The success of the Career Center is the result of a 
joint effort involving Principal George Simonian, 
Career Specialist John LeClere, Guidance Supervisor 
Edward Balcom, and High School Counselor Jeffrey 
Proctor, Anita Charpentier, and John Jarema. 

To stimulate further interest in career exploration, a 
region-wide Career Fair is being planned for late April 
by Merrimack Valley guidance and career personnel. 
The project received its major impetus from School 
Committee members who make up the Merrimack 
Valley Association of School Committees. At this 
writing, Career Day is tentatively planned for 
Chelmsford High on April 29th. The Greater-Lowell 
Chamber of Commerce also is lending its support to the 
"Fair." 

The Regional College Day sponsored by the 
Merrimack Valley Superintendent's Association at the 
Tewksbury High School on October 31 was a well- 
planned cooperative program. Participating in this 
first major regional meeting with forty-one college 
representatives from the New England area were 
senior students from eight high schools in the 
Merrimack Valley. Over three hundred students from 
Chelmsford High School attended the event. A similar 
program is being planned for next year. Chelmsford 
will be the host school. 

A study of the Class of 1975 reveals the following post- 
secondary educational and vocational plans of the 
graduates : 



BoysGirls Totals 



4 year Private colleges or Out-of-state 

' including 4 Nursing 
4 vear Mass. State colleges 

Universities 

' 1 boy nursing 

' 12 girls nursing 
SUB TOTAL - 4 year Colleges 

Universities 



2 year Private Junior Colleges 





13* 


13 


' 2 Forsythe Dental 








2 year Mass. Community Colleges 


15 


41 • 


57 


' 1 Stockbridge 








SUB TOTAL - 2 year Colleges 






70 


R.N. Hospital 





6 


6 


LPN 





3 


3 


Technical Schools (including Art 








Schools, hairdressing. 








apprenticeships. Wentworth) 


21 


7 


28 


Business Schools 





3 


3 


Prep Schools 


2 





2 


Nashoba P.G. 


1 


2 


3 


SUB-TOTAL -all others 






45 


TOTAL POST-SECONDARY 






413 


Employment 


41 


44 


85 


Military Service 


11 


1 


12 


Undecided 


15 


12 


27 



258 279 537 100" 



Some anxiety has arisen recently regarding the 
nation-wide lowering of College Board Test (SAT) 
results. Chelmsford is no exception. Concern has been 
expressed by faculty, students, and parents alike. 
Although our scores have not dropped so noticeably as 
other comparison groups, there is reason to note the 
diminishing scores and to examine what can be done to 
reverse the trend. There are numberous reasons ad- 
vanced, not the least of which is the effect on the verbal 
by the lack of outside reading time because of the 
distraction of television. 

In a recent response to the question, Sidney Marland, 
President of the College Board, offers the following: 

..."The College Board does not yet know the reasons 
for the decline, but we take very seriously our 
responsibility to try to explain the phenomenon as 
dependable evidence is assembled. Most of the 
speculation falls under four general headings: 1) the 
psychometric qualities of the test; 2) The nature of the 
population sitting for test; 3) Factors bearing on the 
nature of secondary education; 4) Factors bearing on 
the conditions of society during the past decade." 

At the time of this writing, an Advisory Panel has 
been named to study the nation-wide decline that has 
occurred over a 12 year period and this panel will 
conduct a detailed and independent study of all issues 
related to this decline. 

In concluding his commentary of the score decline, 
Mr. Marland relates : 

..."The question of SAT score decline with all that it 
connotes for this organization, for the schools, colleges, 
and individuals that it serves, remains a serious one 
that we are examining intensely, but not with a sense of 
panic or hastily developed explanations. In the spirit of 
accountability, it is our full intention to keep you and 
the public at large advised by all appropriate means as 
additional information and clarification become 
available. At this time, we have no substantial 
evidence that enables us to attribute the score decline 
to any single cause or any particular set of causes." 



To illustrate better the SAT score decline, the 
following scores are presented on the graduating 
classes of 1972, 1973, 1974, and 1975. 

These are mean scores (averages) of all seniors who 
took the test during the designated years: 



(13 students indicated marriage) 





Verbal Math N 


umber of 








itudents 








tested 


1972 








Chelmsford High School 


464 


509 


355 


Other comparison groups not 


available 




1973 








Chelmsford High School 


459 


498 


315 


New England Seniors 


447 


482 


112,000 


Nation-wide 


445 


481 


1,014,704 


1974 








Chelmsford High School 


458 


491 


394 


Greater-Boston High Schools 


445 


478 


32,669 


Massachusets High Schools 


445 


477 


54,317 


New England Seniors 


447 


479 


it 1,307 


Nation-wide 


444 


480 


985,115 


1975 








Chelmsford High School 


442 


487 


425 


Greater-Boston High Schools 


434 


469 


34.576 


Massachusetts High Schools 


434 


469 


56,878 


New England Seniors 


437 


471 


115,734 


Nation-wide 


434 


472 


996,391 



The Spring SRA Achievement Test results for the 
elementary grades were received in June, 1975. In 
addition to the individual pupil results being given to 
the parents, a detailed analysis of the results was 
placed in the town libraries and also published in the 
local newspapers. The results justify the efforts of the 
schools in coordinating the curriculum and providing 
appropriate learning materials. 

As did all other consumers, the school lunch program 
faced large increases in the cost of food. Meal prices 
have been increased to the maximum allowable, but a 
slight increase in the amount with which the town 
subsidizes the program was required. The total 
number of meals served to students was 625,076. 
Cafeteria receipts for the school lunch program ending 
June 30, 1975 were $397,455. State and federal aid for 
the same period was $172,014. 

On Memorial Day, May 26, 1975, citizens met 
together to dedicate the Junior High School on 
Graniteville Road. The school was named in honor of 
Lt. Colonel Moses Parker who was one of Chelmsford's 
outstanding patriots. Lt. Colonel Parker was born in 
Chelmsford on May 13, 1731, and died on July 4, 1775, of 
wounds received in the Battle of Bunker Hill. 

It is appropriate that in dedicating this school which 
serves the future, we bridge time by linking it with our 
proud and distinguished past through Lt. Colonel 
Parker. 

In grateful recognition for long years of dedicated, 
valuable service to the youth and citizens of the town, 
School Committee members, Administration, 
colleagues and citizens alike honored the retirement of 
the following employees: 

Sally Conlon (Teacher, North School) 
Leon Pigeon (Maintenance Dept. Supervisor) 
Marion B. Moore (Director of School Food Ser- 
vices) 
Andrew Jacobs (Custodian, McFarlin School) 

It is the sincere wish of the School Committee and 
Administration that the retirees may find the years 
ahead both satisfying and rewarding. To them goes our 
deep appreciation for having contributed so much to so 
many. 

*************************** 

IN MEMORIAM 

It was with deep sorrow that the community 
received news of the untimely death of Mr. Robert 
Sudak, Teaching Principal of the East School, on July 
15, 1975. The things left unsaid would have described an 
enthusiastic, interesting person whose capabilities 
were recognized by all who knew him. 

With the passing of Mrs. Harriett Lalumiere on 
December 20, 1975, Chelmsford lost a most loved and 
respected teacher aide. Mrs. Lalumiere at the time of 
her death was assigned to the Westlands School. 



Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town 
officials and boards, to the school personnel, to the 
Parent-Teacher Organizations, to Educational Ad- 
visory Committees, and to the citizens for. their 
cooperation and assistance this past year. 

The School Committee is most appreciative of the 
assistance rendered by the Chelmsford Jaycee-ettes 
when its members coordinated the efforts of local 
organizations and citizens in sponsoring the Town- 
Wide Pre-School Screening Clinic on March 22, 1975. 



The School Committee wishes to promote increased 
citizen involvement in school task forces, Advisory 
Committees, and other voluntary services and to 
strengthen communications among members of the 
educational community. 

The past year found the School Committee very 
involved in budget, as always, but with a greater 
determination than ever to be as economical as 
possible without compromising the quality of 
educational offerings in the schools. Personnel 
changes, administrative reorganization and the im- 
pact of these changes have been watched closely by the 
Committee. The proposed budget for the 1976-77 school 
year reflects the concern of the School Committee with 
the current fiscal situation. We welcome your com- 
ments, your suggestions, and your support, and we 
pledge to you our best efforts. The budget recom- 
mended for the 1976-77 school year is contained in the 
Finance Committee's Annual Report. 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL-DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



The District Committee for the year 1975 is as 
follows: 



Chelmsford Mr. Stratos G . Dukakis 

Mr. James M. Harrington (Chairman) 

Mr. Louis E. Kelly (Vice-Chairman) 

Mr. Jay M. Knox 

Groton Dr. Thomas Hefele 

Mr. Jordan Waugh 

Littleton Mr. Augustine Kish 

Mr. Lincoln D. Kraeuter 

Westford Mr. Percy O.Daley, Jr. 

Mrs. Charlotte Scott (Secretary) 



District Treasurer 
District Counsel 
Superintendent-Director 



Mr. Thomas A. St. Germain 

Mr. Charles Zaroulis 

Mr. Thomas Lafionatis 



1975 will have to be recognized as the saturation year 
for Nashoba Valley Technical High School. The 490 
student school is almost up to 700, with rented facilities 
and a converted ranch house. The space problem is 
really very critical. The decision of the four towns not 
to accept the Building Committee's recommendations 
two years ago has really come to full bearing this year. 
Studies are under way to consider a pre-engineered 
addition to bring our students from the rented facility 
back to the main building, with no attempt or con- 
sideration to provide for any enrollment expansion 
beyond what we have now. 

Studies commenced this past year to determine the 
viability of some of our programs as they related to the 
job market. Also, consideration is being given to 
clustering other departments for greater efficiency 
and economy. At this point of time our offerings have 
reached 16 from the original 8. The current offerings at 
Nashoba Tech are as follows: 



Auto Body 

Automotive 

Commercial Art & Industrial 

Photography 
Community Service Aide 
Culinary Arts 
Data Processing & 

Business Machines 
Distributive Education 



Drafting 

Electrical 

Electronics 

Graphic Arts 

Painting & Decorating 

Machine 

Metal Fabrication 

Mill & House Carpentry 

Plumbing & Heating 



Adult Education 

Our Adult Education Program continues to be very 
much in demand with applications outstripping by far 
the available space. This year we solicited space for 
two programs to be conducted in Chelmsford under 
Nashoba Tech auspices; and two, in Westford. If it was 
not for the cooperation of these two towns a number of 
citizens would have missed out on adult programs 
because of the lack of space at the Tech. Offerings for 
adult programs are as follows: 

Monday 

Auto Body Home Renovation & Maintenance 

Auto Maintenance Photography, Advance 

Bookkeeping, Int. Physical Fitness - Women 

Data Processing, Int. Plumbing & Heating, Int. 

Drafting School Bus Driving Training 

Electrical Code & Theory Woodworking 

Gourmet Cooking Typing 

Home Painting & Decorating 



Antique Automotive & 

Auto Body 
Automotive for Women 
Bookkeeping, Int. 
Data Processing, Adv. 
Electronics, Basic 
Home Painting & 

Decorating 



Tuesday 



Floral Design 

High School Equivalency 

Physical Fitness - Women 

Small Engine Repair 

Welding 

Woodworking 

Woodworking 



Auto Body 

Auto Maintenance 

Bookkeeping, Int. 



Wednesday 



Creative Crewel 
Creative Crewel 
Electrical Code & Theory 
Gourmet Cooking 
Graphic Arts - Offset Press 
Health Assisant Aid 



Machine Shop 

Ornamental Sheet Metal 

Photography, Dark Room 

Technique 

Physical Fitness - Women 

Plumbing Code & Theory 

Self-Defense 

Woodworking 

Woodworking 

Typing 



Thursday 

Antique Automotive & Auto 



Body 

Automotive for Women 
Bookkeeping 
Commercial Art 
Data Processing 
Electric Wiring 
Floral Design 
Fly Tying 



High School Equivalency 

Photography, Int. 

Physical Fitness - Men 

Small Engine Repair 

Welding 

Woodworking 

Woodworking 

Typing 



Special Needs 
Our Special Needs Program moved from the four 
year old VIP Program, that was being run at our 
school to an integrated 766 Program. The im- 
plementation was done by our Area Coordinator, and 
the whole package will now be transferred for con- 
tinued operation to the Guidance Department, com- 
mencing September 1976. 

Add departments continue to function in their 
respective modes with one of the highlights being that 
the Mill & House Carpentry Departments have em- 
barked on the second house building program for a 
customer. The selection was made by a drawing 
following an advertisement in the newspapers. The 
house is being built in Littleton this year. Another part 
of that department "Historical Restoration" is in the 
process of restoring the original Westford Academy 



which had been used for many years as the Fire 
Department. This project involved bicentennial fund- 
ing, and part of Westford's contribution to the 
Bicentennial. 

A very important milestone was reached this past 
year by Nashoba Tech, and that is accreditation. An 
evaluation was conducted of the total school, and its 
programs by the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges, Inc., and the school was awarded a five 
year accreditation. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department 
for the Fiscal Year 1975. 

At the present time the department is made up of 48 
permanent men. 

Chief of Police 

Robert E. Germann 

Captain 

Richard F. Campbell 

Sergeants 

Leslie H. Adams, Jr. PennrynD. Fitts 

Armand J. Caron James C. Greska 

Walter E . Edwards, Jr. William R. McAllister 

Raymond P. McKeon 



Patrolmen 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
John J. Bell 
Mark L. Burlamachi 
Steven A. Burns 
John P. Campbell 
Lance R. Cunningham 
Patrick W. Daley 
Frederick C.Dillon 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Blair J. Finnegan 
Barnard L. George 
Charles H. Hadley 
John G. Harrington 
Edwin P. Hodgson 
Robert C. Howe 
James J. Kerrigan 
Ronald A. Leach 

Norman L. 



Roland E. Linstad 

Russell H. Linstad 

John J. Mack, Jr. 

Raymond G. McCusker, Jr. 

Henry R. McEnany 

James F. Midgley 

Philip N. Molleur 

Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

John E. Redican, Jr. 

Edward C. Rooney 

Richard A. Simpson 

John B. Sousa 

William H. Strobel, Jr. 

Robert J. Trudel 

Howard R. Ubele 

Daniel J. Walsh 

Eugene W. Walsh 

John O.Walsh 

William R. Walsh 

Wellington 



Intermittent Patrolmen 

Francis W. Ahearn Gary W. McCarthy 

Lloyd E. Butt Timothy F. O'Connor 

Robert L. Cowan, Jr. Robert Popplewell 

Bruce A. Darwin Edward M. Rooney 

Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 



Police Matrons 



Grace Auger 
Nora Clifford 



Mary Long 
Emily Peake 



School Traffic Supervisors 

Joan Dillon Karen Flynn George Marinel 



Secretary 

Louise A. Pigeon 



Clerk 

Nora F. Clifford 



Auxiliary Police Department 

During 1975 the Chelmsford Auxiliary Police served 
the town on thirteen occasions. These included the 
Patriots Day activities, bike-a-thon, parades and 
Halloween. During the summer vacation months 2906 
house checks were made on a regular basis by the men 
of this unit. Together with the thirteen callouts a total 
of 2063 man hours were donated to the town by the men 
of the Auxiliary Police. 

The training program for 1975 continued with the 
emphasis on police procedures, traffic control, 
firearms, basic law, radio communications and 
emergency first aid. Nineteen men have completed 
and been certified on Cardio-Pulmonary- 
Resuscitation. Five men completed the advanced Red 
Cross first aid course. The training program logged 
3659 man hours. The total hours for 1975 was 5722. 

Work continued on improving the rescue capabilities 
of the Emergency Mobile Unit. This unit is now fully 
equipped with the latest first aid equipment. The 
Auxiliary acquired a 1971 Chevrolet sedan, formerly 
used as a police cruiser, and is in the process of 
rebuilding and re-equipping this vehicle into an 
operational emergency vehicle. 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 



Director 


Co-ordinator 


Sgt. Walter W. Edwards, Jr. 


Sgt. Basil Larkin 




(Retired) 


Roster 




EmilAberizk 


William Keenan 


Robert Abreau 


Robert Loyd 


Lloyd Anstey 


Frederic Mehan 


Kenneth Berger 


Manuel Mello 


George Brown 


Edward Norton 


Roger Clermont 


Bruce Pemberton 


JohnDaughraty 


Thomas Peterson 


Paul Dean 


James Quinn 


Douglas Drobnis 


David Ramsay 


Leroy Fielding 


George Roscoe 


Leo Flanagan 


Nicholas Stratis 


Roger Gregoire 


Jeffrey Taylor 


John Hartnett, Jr. 


Raymond Tremblay 


Leland B.Kelly 


Clifford Varnum 


ARRESTS 






1974 1975 


Crimes Against Person 


59 45 


Crimes Against Property 


65 91 


Crimes Against Public Order 


1,326 1,416 



DISPOSITION OF CASES 1975 

Fined 830 

Placed on Probation 34 

Suspended Sentence and Placed on Probation 38 

Placed on File 75 

Not Guilty Finding 28 

Dismissed 25 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs 18 

Committed to Youth Service Board 3 

Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 1 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 1 
Turned over to out of town Police Departments 

and Courts 119 

Cases Continued Without a Finding 55 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 65 

Cases Pending and Continued in the courts 260 



1974 


1975 


12,454 


12,309 


1,707 


1,409 


110 


149 


839 


1,030 


278 


351 


5 


5 


389,521 


517,652 


2,832 


2,906 


646 


431 


1,565 


1,985 


523 


565 


127 


243 


372 


415 



Calls Answered by Cruisers 
Summonses Served 
Licenses Suspended 
Accidents Reported 
Personal Injuries Claimed 
Fatal Accidents 
Mileage of Cruisers 
Special Property Checks 
Station Lock-ups 
Citations Issued 
Parking Violations 
Doors and Windows found open 
Detoxification Unit 



RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 



Photocopying Machine 

Firearm Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 

Firearm Identification Cards 

Court Fines 

Photographs 

Detail Account Service Charge 



Education and Training are still very important with 
our department. At this time we have attending the 
following: 



1974 


1975 


$1,862.00 


$ 1,898,00 


2,661.00 


2,940.00 


25.25 


48.25 


476.00 


2,030.00 


1,052.70 


2,852.00 


440.00 


506.00 


2,664.80 


4,050.81 


$9,181.75 


$14,325.06 



Northeastern University 
Middlesex Community College 
Lowell University 



6 Men 
2 Men 
IMan 



Other training courses that our men attended in 1975: 

Mass. Training Council Rape Investigators 

School 2 Men 

Northern Middlesex Police Academy 5 Men 

Mass. State Police Breathalyzer School 2 Men 

Emergency Medical Training Course 2 Men 
Department of Attorney General Drug 

Abuse School 1 Man 

Criminal Justice Seminar 2 Men 

Bloomberg Police School 9 Men 

This year, as you can see by the personnel roster, we 
have established an Intermittent Patrolmen List. 
These men are all qualified men that have passed the 
Police Entrance Exam and have been certified. They 
can be used at any time for regular patrol duty or in 
case of emergency work. 

This year we have also started installation of the new 
Police Inter City Radio Hookup. This will be on the 
Ultra High Frequency Radio Band. It will give us radio 
contact with surrounding cities and towns. This will be 
of great assistance to Police Departments. We hope to 
have this system in full operation in the near future. 

This year while patrolling the highways and roads of 
our town, the mobile units covered 517,652 miles. 

We would also like to express our thanks and ap- 
preciation to the Bournival Chrysler Plymouth 
Company of Lowell for the donation of our safety car. 
Our Safety Program is very important to us, and we 
will continue to keep it in full operation. 



In conclusion, I would like to offer my sincere ap- 
preciation and thanks to the various officials and 
department heads, the Captain, Sergeants, Patrolmen 
and the citizens of the town for their continued help and 
cooperation. Because of their combined efforts I am 
sure Chelmsford is a better and safer place in which to 
work and live. 

Respectfully Submitted. 

Robert E. Germann 
Chief of Police 



On December 29. the contract was signed for the new 
Fire Station on Riverneck Road in East Chelmsford. 
Funds were appropriated at the annual town meeting. 
Construction should begin sometime in January with a 
completion date set for August. 

A new 1000 gallon per minute pumper authorized last 
year is on order and scheduled for delivery in the 
summer of 1976. 

This year the Fire Department is requesting funds in 
the budget for eight additional men for the new fire 
station. 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMISSION 

The Civil Defense Commission, which has been 
meeting regularly on the second Tuesday of each 
month, going over various reports from the State and 
Federal Civil Defense, Office of Emergency 
Preparedness. 

The necessary program papers were completed and 
accepted by the State and Federal Civil Defense 
agencies, which made the Town eligible for Surplus 
Property. Some Property was purchased from the 
Taunton Surplus Supplies Department at substantial 
savings to the Town. 

The Communications Center participated in the 
monthly drills with Area 1 in Tewksbury and other 
towns, and we are grateful to our Communications 
Officer and member of this commission Mel DeJager 
for the time and effort he has put into our Com- 
munications Center. 

The Auxiliary Police has been very active this past 
year, assisting the Police Department, at parades, 
band concerts and assisting in the summer months 
with the checking of homes of residents on vacation. 
Their Rescue Truck and Car are now ready for 
emergency operation. 

We wish to thank the Heads of the various Depart- 
ments and the Board of Selectmen for the fine 
cooperation received this past year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 

George J. Brown 

George R. Dixon 

William W. Edge 

Walter W. Edwards 



Melvin P. DeJager 
Charles Koulas 
Joseph E. Stavely 
Christos A. Alexion 



I wish to express my thanks to all town officials and 
employees for the excellent cooperation given to the 
fire department during the past year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Frederick H. Reid 
Fire Chief 

Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward G. Quinn 

Captains 

William H. Thayer Charles S. Galloway, Jr. 

Allen C.Mello James M. Spinney 

Robert C. Spa ulding 

Clerk 

Mary Ann Koulas 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Thomas P. Miskell 
Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr. 
Charles Ferreira 
Edward J. McGovern 
Robert K. Adams 
AlvinF. Wetmore 
JackD.Hadley 
Harvey M. Miller 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T.Wetherbee 
Francis J. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Robert L. Hughes 
Thomas J. Curran 
James P. Flaherty 
Joseph F. Lynch 



Privates 

Paul D.Hayes 

TerranceA. Goode 

William H. Hadley 

Leo A. Martin 

Emil R. Magiera 

Philip Dube 

Ronald J. Sawicki 

Joseph E.Staveley 

John P. DePalma 

Walter F. Adley, Jr. 

Dennis Vargeletis 

Michael A. Blazonis 

Richard L. Grenon 

Ronald L. Johnson 

Wallace V. Maybury, Jr. 

William V. Cady, Jr. ; 

Ronald 0. Wikander 

James A. Sousa 

William F. Curran 

Daniel T. Reid 

Joseph J. Spinazola 

Michael McTeague 

Ernest J. Frobese 

James P. Curran 



This year for the first time the Fire Department 
responses exceeded 1000 calls with increase mainly in 
automobile accidents, motorvehicle fires and 
malicious false alarms which in itself showed an in- 
crease of 87%. Of major concern to the Fire Depart- 
ment is the number of motor vehicles being stolen and 
burned in the Town of Chelmsford with approximately 
fifty cases of arson involving motor vehicles this year 
alone. 



CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE in 1975 





c 
a 


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2 


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o 


a> 

c 

—1 


-1 


cb 

< 


a. 

CO 


u 
O 


> 

o 

z 


J 
a 


o 

o 


Accidents 


1 





3 


8 


3 


6 


3 


2 


2 


4 


5 


5 


42 


Brush 





6 


19 


66 


26 


10 


15 


1 


3 


9 


28 


6 


189 


Building 


9 


4 


15 


11 


2 


7 


6 


2 


9 


8 


7 


16 


96 


Dump 














2 

















2 


2 


6 


False-Malicious 


5 


7 


9 


5 


4 


13 


10 


14 


9 


21 


8 


4 


109 


False-Accidental 


6 


5 





5 


5 


4 


2 


4 


1 


2 


3 


5 


42 


Misc. 


16 


22 


27 


34 


26 


18 


29 


26 


15 


15 


22 


29 


279 


Lock Out 


2 





1 





3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


5 


1 


2 


20 


1st Aid 


2 





1 


2 








2 








1 





2 


10 


Mutual Aid 





2 


5 


2 








2 


1 


2 


2 


3 


2 


21 


Resuscitator 


13 


10 


8 


11 


11 


8 


5 


7 


11 


11 


14 


19 


128 


Vehicle 


8 


7 


6 


14 


16 


13 


13 


22 


6 


10 


11 


6 


132 



62 63 94 158 98 82 



80 59 88 104 98 



1,074 



EAST CHELMSFORD FIRE STATION 
BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Walter Hedlund, Chairman 
Frederick Reid, Edward Quinn, 

Fire Chief Deputy Fire Chief 

George Dixon Edward Hoyt, Secretary 

The above committee met in February 1975 and 
voted to insert in the annual Town Warrant an article 
requesting that the sum of $275,000 be appropriated for 
the construction of this station. Following approval of 
this article at Town meeting the archietect made 
structural changes in the design of the station to bring 
the cost more in line with the sum of money that was 
appropriated. 

Complete working plans and specifications were 
prepared for bidding and on November 18th bids for 
sub-contract work were received and opened at the 
architect's office. Sealed bids for the general contract 
were received and opened at the architects office 
November 25th. A total of fifteen bids were received 
with costs ranging from a low of $244,397 to a high of 
$304,622. The successful bidder was the Petruccelli 
Construction Co. of Lynn, Mass. 

At a meeting with the Board of Selectmen on 
December 29th contract documents were signed by the 
Selectmen, with Committee and the contractor. The 
projected completion date is expected to be early fall of 
1976. 

Respectfully submitted , 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Chairman 



Six new streets were accepted in 1975. 

The recycling program that was implemented by the 
Highway Department has been continued. Papers are 
collected on a monthly basis. 

Spring Clean Up Days were conducted during the 
week of April 14 through April 18 and the Fall Clean Up 
Days were conducted the week of October 6 through 
October 10. 

In July, the City of Lowell decreased its fees from 
$13.00 per ton to $11.00 per ton for the use of the Lowell 
Land Fill. The Town owned dump, located on Swain 
Road, North Chelmsford, is open two days a week for 
Chelmsford residents. (Wednesday's and Saturday's 
from 8:00A.M. to 12:00N and 12:30P.M. to 4:00P.M.) 

Drainage projects include the following: 

Diamond Street 160' 6" asphalt coated pipe, 11 feet 
12" pipe 4 catch basins installed. 

Fairbanks Road 30 feet 10" asphalt coated pipe 
(replaced cement pipe.) 

Locust Road 14 feet 12" asphalt coated pipe. 

High Street 22 feet 10" asphalt coated pipe, 

(replaced cement pipe) 

Rainbow Ave. 198 feet 12" R.C. pipe, 2 catch basins 
installed. 

Waverly Ave. 482 feet 12" R.C. pipe, 3 catch basins 
installed. 

Evergreen Street 175 feet 12" R.C. pipe, 1 manhole 
installed. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the Highway Department 
for the year 1975: 

Year 



1955 
1966 
1975 



No. Reg. H'way 


No. Reg. Waste 


Employees 


Col. Employees 


21 


3 


27 


13 


37 


16 



Groton Road 168 feet 12" R.C. pipe, 205 feet 12" 

aluminum pipe, 2 catch basins in- 
stalled. 

Summer Street 324 feet 18" aluminum pipe, 112" 12" 
R.C. pipe, 2 manhole and 1 catch 
basin installed. 

Davis Road 276 feet 12" R.C. pipe, 1 catch basin 

installed 

Pineneedle St. 20 feet 12" aluminum pipe, 20 feet 6" 
aluminum pipe. 



Brentwood Road 60 feet 18" aluminum pipe, 3 feet 24" 
aluminum pipe, 1 manhole installed. 

Sheppard Lane 176 feet 10" asphalt coated pipe, 2 
catch basins installed. 

Southgate Road 20 feet aluminum pipe. 

Billerica Road 1 manhole, 1 catch basin installed. 

Boston Road 2 catch basins installed. 

The Chapter 90 Construction project was continued 
on Acton Road. The work consisted of adjustment of 
drainage structure castings. A bituminous concrete top 
course was placed over the existing bituminous binder 
course from Sleigh Road to Elm Street. All slopes were 
graded, loamed and seeded. 

Under Chapter 1140 funds, Golden Cove Road and a 
section of Boston Road were resurfaced with 
bituminous concrete. Sidewalks were installed on 
Boston Road (from Warren Avenue to Summer Street) 
and Acton Road ( from Sleigh Road to Elm Street) . 

Sidewalks were also installed on a portion of Mid- 
dlesex Street. 

Under Chapter 825 funds, sections of Westford Street, 
Boston Road, Billerica Road and Mill Road were 
resurfaced with bituminous concrete. 

Guard Rail was installed on Sherman Street and 
Turnpike Road. 

New equipment purchased for the Highway 
Department is as follows : One Waste Collection Truck, 
Two Dump Trucks, One Roller, One Trailer. 

The usual oiling of streets, including mix-in-places, 
brush cutting, fabricating, replacing and installing of 
street signs, painting traffic lines, cleaning catch 
basins, rebuilding and repairing sunken catch basins, 
sanding, snow plowing and snow removal, sweeping 
streets, drainage and general maintenance were 
performed throughout the year. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their kind con- 
sideration and cooperation and the Police Department 
for notifying the department of dangerous conditions 
on the streets during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis Rondeau 
Superintendent of Streets 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health 

Paul F. McCarthy, Chairman 
Paul J. Canniff , D.D. Peter Dulchinos 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Senior Clerk 

Thomas W. Morris, R.S. Barbara A . Korsak 

Board of Health Physician 

Benjamin Blechman, M.D. 

Plumbing Inspector, Civil Service 

William H. Shedd 

Permanent Intermittent Plumbing Inspector, 
Civil Service 

Richard M.Kelly 



Water Pollution Control 

In 1975 the water pollution control program con- 
tinued its effort to clean up the streams. Numerous 
complaints were filed in District Court, several of 
which have been continued to 1976. 

The Board performed 140 dye tests and issued 119 
permits to repair septic systems in addition to issuing 
78 permits for construction of new septic systems. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed 

below : 

Percolation tests - 107 $ 1,605.00 

Testing paint for lead content - 49 650.00 

Hot water permits -182 910.00 

Plumbing permits - 145 1,370.00 

Sewage permits - 197 1,970.00 

Miscellaneous licenses & fees 13,917.50 

Amount received for 1975 $20,422.50 

Rabies Clinic & Encephalitis Clinic 

Administered by Martin Gruber, D.V.M., a total of 
353 animals were innoculated against Rabies. 

A total of 60 horses were innoculated against En- 
cephalitis at the clinic. 

Public Health 

During 1975, the Board of Health Nurse attended 
Board of Health Meetings periodically in order to 
report her activities and received feedback from the 
Members. 

Her duties included the usual state required follow- 
up on persons exposed to TB, persons having had 
communicable diseases and persons having premature 
infants. 

Seven premature infants were visited and assistance 
given to parents on care of the babies. 

There were three reports of newly active TB in 1975. 
Mantoux tests were performed on bus drivers, nursing 
home employees, nursery school personnel and con- 
tacts of known cases of Tuberculosis. 

With the cooperation of school nurses and Dr. Blech- 
man, Board of Health Physician, the following im- 
munizations were given: 

Pre-School & School Immunizations 
DPT 16 

MMR 10 

Polio 506 

Rubella 155 

TD 514 

The Town Nurse rendered home visits and com- 
pleted investigations and reports for the State for the 
following communicable diseases: 



Encephalitis 
Hepatitis 
Menigitis 
Salmonella 



The Town Nurse took and recorded blood pressure 
readings on a monthly basis. 

The flu clinic this year was a joint effort of the 
Council on Aging and the Board of Health. Dr. Blech- 
man, Town Physician, was in attendance. The clinic 
was opened to any senior citizen and any Chelmsford 
resident with a chronic illness. Employees of the Town 
of Chelmsford were also offered the injection. In total 
there were 191 flu injections administered. 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

Excise Tax Abatements 

Real Estate Tax 

R.E. Tax December Assessment 

Personal Property Tax 

Number of Dwellings 8.600 



The following report of the activities of the Assessors 
Department for the year 1975 is hereby submitted: 



Number issued 


30.156 


Total Tax 


$1,564,676.63 


Number Granted 


4,612 


Amount 


160,320.53 


Assessments 


9,649 


Value 


256,084,115.00 


Assessments 


5 


Value 


73,050.00 


Assessments 


625 


Value 


9,776,300.00 



Statutory Exemptions 

Type 

Clause41 (Elderly) 
Clause 22 (Veteran) 
Clause 37 (Blind) 
Clause 17,18 (Age, Infirmity 

Financial Condition) 
R.E. Tax Abatements 

(Over Value, erroneous etc. 



234 

518 

12 

60 
27 



80,751.50 

93,489.30 

5,250.00 

25,271.96 
9,115.56 



RECAPITULATION 



Town appropriations and charges 

State assessments 

County Tax and hospial 

Overlay Account 

Gross amount to be raised 



$20,015,783.76 
199,509.13 
585,896.21 
230,238.51 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



$21,031,427.61 



All revenue derived from excise tax 

and department receipts 
Total amount from state (Cherry Sheet) 
Transfers from available funds 
Available funds to reduce tax rate 
Total estimated receipts and available funds 

Total to be raised by taxation 

Fiscal 1976 tax rate $41 .50/1000 valuation 
1974 Rate 39.00 1973 Rate 44.00 



$ 1,521,163.00 

6,730,750.39 

1,096,307.00 

650,000.00 



$ 9,998,220.39 
$1 1 ,033,207.22 



The calendar year 1975 has been a very busy year for 
both the Assessors and the clerical staff. 

The assessors have spent many hours in the field 
following-up on 369 building permits consisting of 89 
new dwellings, 102 new additions, 51 pools, 42 
remodeling jobs and 85 various other improvements. 
This not only entails the measuring and listing of these 
properties but most important, the determination of 
value. 

As the taxpayers of Chelmsford are well aware, a 
complete mass appraisal of all properties was done in 
1972. Because of the highly inflated real estate market 
assessments are now only at about 70%, an increase in 
the market of 10% a year. On December 24, 1974 the 
State Supreme Judicial Court handed down a decision 
in the "Sudbury Case" declaring that all real property 
in the commonwealth must be assessed at full and fair 
cash value. The State Tax Commission, in carrying out 
this court decision has placed the burden on the local 
assessors to not only submit a plan for updating 
assessments but also a plan to maintain these property 
assessments at 100%. The Chelmsford Assessors will 
endeavor to comply with this court mandate but a 
specific timetable has not been established. A com- 



plete study is now under way to determine the most 
accurate and thorough procedure to follow in com- 
plying with this very important court decision. 

In September, the annual Assessors school was held 
at the University of Massachusetts campus in 
Amherst, Mass. Miss Janet Lombard, the newest 
member of the board successfully completed the in- 
termediate and advanced course in assessing practices 
and is well on her way to becoming a Certified 
Massachusetts Assessor. 

The clerical staff has been very busy processing 
approximately 30,000 excise tax bills, 9,600 real estate 
tax bills, 625 personal property bills, 5,463 various 
abatements and exemptions and over 600 transfers of 
property within the town. 

We would hope that in 1976 this volume of work will 
only increase, a good indication of our economy 
making a healthy recovery. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 
Board of Assessors 



PLANNING BOARD 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 




Stephen D. Wojcik 
PLANNING BOARD Chairman 



Mr. Stephen D Wojcik, Chairman 
Mr. Peter J. McHugh, 

Vice Chairman 
Mr. Eugene E. Gilet, Clerk 



Mr. Thomas E. Firth 



Mr. Thomas A. Ennis 
(Resigned) 
Mr. A. Robert Raab 
Mrs. Ann McCarthy 



Mr. Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 



The Planning Board reorganized for the year with 
Mr. Stephen D. Wojcik as Chairman, Mr. Peter J. 
McHugh as Vice Chairman, Mr. Eugene E. Gilet as 
Clerk and as Planning Board Representative to 
Northern Middlesex Area Planning Commission, 
and Mrs. Nancy Maynard as Recording Clerk. 

A low of four (4) subdivisions were brought before 
the Planning Board for approval under subdivision 
control law, at which time seventeen (17) new building 
lots were created. Forty-nine (49) individual lots not 
requiring approval under subdivision control law were 
approved by the Planning Board, this number being 
consistent with years past reflecting the creation of 
some building lots and the other being the mere 
changing of title of ownership. 

No areas changed zoning last year, probably in 
anticipation of the possible presentation of the new 
zoning map and new zoning regulations proposed by 
the Planning Board. Because of errors in the 
publication, it was impossible to make a presentation 
to the townspeople, at Town Meeting for their con- 
sideration, however, every attempt shall be made to 
correct the publication errors prior to the present 
Town Meeting. 

The next major project for the Planning Board will 
be a complete review of the present subdivision rules 
and regulations, particularly in the areas of 
engineering and supervision of construction of new 
roads, engineering fees, requiring as built drawings 
from developers when a project is finished prior to 
road acceptance and other related problems. 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN D. WOJCIK 
Chairman 



The volume of work in the department as well as the 
case load has increased considerably during 1975. The 
continued rise in unemployment, illness of veterans, 
labor dispute etc. , have all been contributing factors in 
the high cost of Veterans' Benefits for the year. 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

For the period January 1, 1975 through December 31, 
1975, the department handled a total of 597 cases. In 
July 1975, all recipients on our rolls who were eligible 
for Social Security benefits, received an 8% increase in 
benefits. In January 1975, all recipients who were 
eligible for pension received a 10% increase in benefits. 
For 1975, we settled two assignment cases for a total of 
$987.00. 



Cash and Material Grants Account 



Year 

1974 

1975 

Month 

January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 
Total : 



Expended 

$98,314.23 
98,414.64 

Expended 

$15,360.95 
7,840.42 
9,777.94 
8,468.72 
6,986.41 
16,956.90 
3,685.24 
6,551.82 
6,872.19 
6,237.95 
5,509.62 
4.166.48 

$98,414.64 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



In addition to the administration of financial 
assistance to our recipients, the department also 
renders veterans services to our veterans and their 
dependents. 

To: 

Jamaica Plain, V. A. 3 

West Roxbury 8 

Bedford, V.A. 40 

Brockton, V.A. 6 

Total trips 74 

The department works in conjunction with the 
Veterans Administration and Social Security office to 
obtain benefits for our recipients who are eligible for 
benefits. This reduces the amount of benefits which 
this department must pay to individual cases. An 
accounting is kept on all benefits derived from other 
sources. 



Benefits from: 




Veterans Administration 


$ 97,145.00 


Social Security 


58,000.00 


Supplemental Soc. Sec. 


3,650.00 


Total: 


$158,795.00 



I wish to acknowledge the cooperation that we 
received from the Veterans Administration Regional 
Office in Boston and the Veterans' Services Contact 
Office in Boston during the year, which enables us to 
obtain benefits for our veterans and dependents. We 
are grateful for their assistance. 



We also wish to thank the office of the Commissioner required the applicant to remain away from his work 

and his staff for their fine cooperation during the year. and he was hospitalized for a period of a few weeks 

Only through their cooperation are we able to give our 

veterans and their dependents the service and Assistance, in the form of material grants, was 

assistance they are eligible to receive. approved in both cases and payments were made to the 

electric utility company and a fuel oil dealer to help 
To the various departments and agencies that assist these veterans. 

us through the year, our most sincere thanks and 

gratitude. The Committee also voted to raise the annual 

allotment for Veterans of World War II from $100.00 to 
Respectfully submitted, $250.00. A financial report is submitted with this 

written report. Total assets are now $6,336.54 
Mary K. McAuliffe 

Veterans' Agent Veterans of World War II who desire to file an ap- 

w»h»> ».■#.. »«»*.«» »■«««» -.....«. plication for aid should first contact the local Veterans' 

VETERANS EMERGENCY FUND Agent, so that it can first be determined if assistance 

COMMITTEE should come from the Veterans' Benefits Program, 

which the town and state jointly support. 

The year 1975 has been a more active year for 

members of the Veterans' Emergency Fund Com- The present membership of the committee, by 

mittee compared to recent years. The present state of precincts, follows: 
the economy of the country has in some ways affected 

the fund inasmuch as we are far more apt to receive Precinct 1 : Dr. Albert W. Willis 

applications for assistance when a recession occurs. Precinct 2: Victor W. Fetro 

PrGcinct 3 * Jsmcs J Wslkcr 

All applications are at first reviewed by the town's Precinct 4 : John J McNulty 

Veterans' Agent and in some cases the town is unable Precinct 5- George F Waite 

to assist completely. When such situations arise, the Precinct 6- Alfred H Coburn 

committee accepts the application and the members Precinct 7 ■ Thomas A Ennis 

are called to a meeting, to decide what, and if any Precinct 8 ': Kenneth A. Cooke 

assistance should be given. Precinct 9: Peter J. Saulis 

... . , , . ,„„„ , Precinct 10: Melvin P. DeJager 

Two applications were received during 1975 and Precinct 11- Herbert T Knutson 

meetings were held during June and November and in Precinct 12 ■ Gerard A Vayo 
both instances assistance was approved and payments 

were made. For tne veterans' Emergency 

„,..,. t j Fund Committee by 

In one case the applicant s income was interrupted 

by lack of employment for a period of several months, Alfred H Coburn 

and in another case, a most serious illness had Chairman 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 

January 1st, 1975 thru December 31st, 1975 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1975: $ 6,446.87 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest $ 205.73 

The First Federal Savings & Loan Association, Lowell, Mass. 

Dividends ■ $ '39.36 

Total Receipts $ 345.09 

Total of Balance on Hand as of Jonuary 1 st, 1 975 & Receipts: $ 6,791 .96 

Deduct Disbursements: 

Veterans' Assistance: Two Applications Approved $ 455.42 

Balance on Hand as of December 31 st, 1 975: $ 6,336.54 

ASSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

On Deposit, Bank Book Number 1 28790 $ 3.736.54 

First Federal Savings & Loan Association, Lowell, Mass. 
formerly Middlesex Cooperative Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Ten (10) Paid-Up Shares, Certificate No. 3025 $2,000.00 

Three (3) Matured Shares, Certificate No. 2380 600.00 

Total value of Bank Shares $ 2,600.00 

Total Assets: .... $6,336.54 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities $ None 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Respectfully yours, 

ALFRED H. COBURN. TREASURER 



65 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Chairman-S. Robert Monaco 
Vice Chairman-Marshall Arkin 



Charles Higgins 
Robert Kydd 
Carolyn Bennett 



Alternates 

Marguerite Waldron 

Joe Dappel 

Daniel Burke 



The Board of Appeals has held thirty-five hearings 
for Special Permits/Variances. They were dispensed 
with as follows: 



Granted 

Denied 

Withdrawn 



The Board would like to take this opportunity to 
thank the town employees and elected officials for 
their cooperation in the past year. 

S. Robert Monaco 
Chairman 



Construction Act funds for videotape equipment. We 
continue to be active members of Lowell Area Council 
on Interlibrary Networks and share in the operation of 
radio WLTI (91.5 F.M.) and other cooperative projects. 

In sum, 1975 was a year of intensive planning and 
preparation, but not without ongoing achievements. 
With the help of our Friends, volunteers, patrons and 
staff we expect to see this work come to full fruition in 
1976 and by so doing add an exciting dimension to 
public library service in Chelmsford. 

STATISTICAL REPORT 

Monies deposited with Town Treasurer $16,448.42 

Circulation 248,010 

New Cards Issued 2,579 

Employees (Full time including C.E.T.A.) ' 12 

E mploy ees ( Par t Time ) 24 

Department Heads: Goldie Creamer (MacKay 
branch), Lillian Storey (Circulation), Bea Beaubien 
(Children's), Linda Webb (Art & Music), Joan Allard 
(Reference) 

Hours open per week for service (both Libraries ) 126 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Adams Library, Boston Road 

Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 



Library Trustees 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Chairman 
Audrey Carragher 
James Harrington 



Jean Mansfield 

Howard Moore 

Roger Welch 



Expansion was the keyword for 1975. The originally 
anticipated addition, which was to have been con- 
structed with the substantial assistance of the staff and 
students of Nashoba Valley Technical High School, was 
halted due to vigorous opposition from certain area 
trade unions. The resolution of the legal questions 
raised by this issue was not pursued when the Building 
Committee chose instead to turn its attention to the 
former Scoboria house and property adjacent to the 
Adams Library. The purchase was made after the 
change in plans had been sanctioned by a special town 
meeting. Under the guidance of the Trustees work was 
begun in November of 1975 to prepare the building for 
use as a Children's House, with library staff offices on 
the second floor. This alternative compares favorably 
in cost, schedule and utility with what was first en- 
visioned in 1974 and it provides the library more than 
one acre additional land. It appears to us clearly a case 
of all things working out for the better. 

While the solutions to library space needs were 
being discussed and worked out regular library 
business continued its steady upward march. Cir- 
culation fell just short of the quarter million mark with 
the largest advances being made in Fine Art and Adult 
materials. Special programs attracted over 6,000 
persons, with the library's Bicentennial slide tape, 
"Chelmsford at the Turn of the Century," being en- 
joyed inside and outside the library. Grants were 
received from the Massachusetts Council on Arts and 
Humanities for the Community Calendar, from Neigh- 
borhood Youth Corps for children's summer theater 
and $9220. worth of Federal Library Services and 



Respectfully submitted, 
DAVID J. PANCIERA, Library Director 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 



Arne R. Olsen 

Gerald Hardy Arthur J. Colmer 

George E. Baxendale 

The Cemetery Commissioners are pleased to report 
a few of our accomplishments this past year. 

Pine Ridge Cemetery has had three and one half 
acres of wooded land developed into approximately 
one thousand lots. This work was done by our regular 
labor force with no extra cost to the Town. 

The department has had a considerable increase in 
the sale of lots this past year. 

This year we have seen completed a fifty foot ad- 
dition to our garage. This addition has given us a much 
larger maintenance area plus new office space, which 
we feel will allow us to serve the public in a more 
suitable atmosphere. This addition is being paid for 
through the will of Vileata S. Douglas. 

People coming to the Cemetery office will be pleased 
to see a new entrance within the Cemetery, eliminating 
the hazard of traffic on Billerica Road ■ 

Respectfully submitted, 
Chairman Arne R. Olsen 



PARK COMMISSION 

Park Superintendent: Donald P. Gray 

The goal of the Park Department continues to be one 
of providing the best possible maintenance to all Town 
parks and recreational areas and yet striving to keep 
the costs to a minimum to the taxpayers. The year 1975 



66 



brought increased maintenance responsibilities at the 
newly constructed football and soccer field at Roberts 
Playground Recreational area. Also this year the Park 
Department assisted the Varney Commission with the 
mowing at the Varney Playground as well as assisted 
in the preparation of new lawn seedings at the Adams 
Library and the square at Routes 27 and 4. 

The Department's long range plans include the 
acceptance of the ground maintenance at many newly 
developing recreational facilities as well as the con- 
tinued responsibility to meet the yearly demands of 
proper maintenance at all Town squares, commons, 
and parks. These properties must be cleared of debris, 
seeded, loam and fertilizer spread at proper times, 
mowed and certain areas planted with flowers and 
shrubs. The coming Bicentennial year will again see 
Town flower plantings in red, white and blue. 

This past year the Park Department relocated two 
large flagpoles that had deteriorated, one at East 
Chelmsford Monument, the other in the South Village. 
All the flagpoles were painted and the large one in 
North Chelmsford was repaired with a rotted section 
being removed. We are again very grateful for the 
continued assistance with the task of daily flag raisings 
from various townspeople. Our special thanks to the 
Fire Department for the Center flags; to Captain 
William Thayer for his assistance at Fletcher Square 
at North Road and Worthen; to Mrs. Mark and her son 
for their help at Winship Square in West Chelmsford; 
and the Kiwanis Club for their efforts at Gallagher 
Square. 

The Park Department wishes to thank Paul Hart for 
his time and equipment in preparation of the adult 
Softball field in North Chelmsford. And, again we 
express our deep appreciation to the Highway 
Superintendent and his department for their 
cooperation and assistance in many of our projects - 
one being the curbing around Perham Park at Worthen 
and Westford Streets. Our appreciation to the Fire 
Chief and his department for plowing at the skating 
area at Roberts Field and to the many garden clubs 
and various other town departments and organizations 
for their unlimited support and cooperation this past 
year. 

The Park Commissioners are extremely proud that 
Superintendent Don Gray was named The Outstanding 
Town Employee of Chelmsford in 1975. It is through his 
dedication and cooperation with all the other depart- 
ments of the Town that help make Chelmsford a good 
place to live. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph E. House, Chairman 

Arthur Louis Bennett, Commissioner 

J. Joan Schenk, Commissioner 

Donald P. Gray, Park Superintendent 

D.P.W. STUDY COMMITTEE 

Since its appointment by the Selectmen in April, the 
committee has studied the procedure for establishing a 
department of public works (DPW) and studied the 
workings and structure of the existing departments in 
the town which could be included in a DPW. The 
committee has also interviewed DPW Chairmen from 
some 16 towns of similar size to Chelmsford. As a result 
of this work, the committee has reached the following 
conclusions: (a) in general, it is considered that the 



delivery of town services as currently provided are 
adequate and are perceived to be so by the public, 
recognizing that at present water supply and sewage 
disposal are not town services and (b) the data ob- 
tained to date, while tending to point favorably toward 
the future establishment of a DPW, still requires ex- 
tensive analysis and further detailed supporting data 
in order to be able to present a comprehensive, ob- 
jective proposal to the townspeople. 

The committee has presented the Board of Select- 
men with a set of recommendations on the eventual 
establishment of a DPW and has requested that the 
Board of Selectmen authorize the committee to in- 
vestigate and pursue the availability of outside con- 
sulting services along with a suitable method of fund- 
ing to compile substantiating statistical evidence to 
support this position. 

Gerald Silver, Chairman 
George Auchy Barbara Langworthy 

Arthur Glazer Joan Schenk 

Jack Massachelin Gary Lewis 

(Resigned 7/29/75) (Resigned 9/17/75) 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

The efforts of the Commission and its associated 
organizations were most rewarding during the past 
year, as the various Programs offered to the youth of 
the Community enjoyed yet another year of progress. 
The members of the Commission were most grateful 
for the efforts of all volunteers and the encouragement 
and cooperation of other Boards within the Com- 
munity 

The Commission was pleased with the results of the 
various Summer Programs. Every playing field and 
playground was active during the summer period with 
boys and girls pursuing activities such as Soccer, 
Basketball, Softball, Baseball, Football, Tennis, Track 
and Field, Wrestling, Weightlifting, Gymnastics, as 
well as the usual Programs associated with our regular 
summer playground activities. More children than 
ever before were participating in healthful physical 
activities. 

We were also successful in securing a rather limited, 
but successful, Summer Arts Program with the 
Chelmsford Community Band providing regular 
summer concerts and our own Chelmsford Free 
Summer Theatre providing theatrical productions on 
the Common. The Summer Theatre was unique for 
Chelmsford and drew enthusiastic responses from 
residents who viewed the four productions staged by 
local youths. In the coming year both concerts and free 
theatre will be offered as well as, hopefully, our first 
Summer Arts Festival. 

The Commission was equally fortunate to secure the 
support of both the Board of Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee in obtaining funds to keep open the 
East School building as the first Chelmsford Com- 
munity Center. Our initial efforts in this direction are, 
of course, only meagre as we must redesign our 
thinking to include the vast portion of our population 
not relating to strictly physical activities. A limited 
number of Community groups are currently using the 
building, including the Art Society. The Society is of- 
fering a full range of youth and adult classes. With the 
continued support of the Community and the various 
Boards, the Commission will be able to offer the Town 



a Community Center that will provide a wide range of 
passive and active recreation during the day and the 
evening for the full enjoyment of all residents. We 
actively seek support of all residents in this venture. 

Our own Robert's property was improved again this 
year with the addition of a large size playing area. It 
will be available for regular use in 1977 as we need a 
full year to provide a suitable playing surface. Lighting 
was also added for the skating area to lengthen the 
hours that this facility will be available for residents. 

Work was also begun on a new Softball Field on the 
Southwell property. This area will be in use for the 
Men's Softball Leagues and other Softball play in the 
Town. The new Softball Fields were completed early 
last fall; at the McFarlin School and the East School. 
Both fields are non-grass infields to reduce field 
maintenance. 

Soccer finally arrived in Chelmsford with a roar. A 
Summer League sponsored by the Commission and the 
Youth Soccer League provided League play for both 
boys and girls. The phenominal success of this sport 
will create problems next summer as there will simply 
not be enough playing areas for the anticipated 
number of children expected to register. 

The success of our Programs is due in no small 
measure to the some 500 residents who regularly 
volunteer their time, and, in some cases, their money, 
to make our Programs work. We could not buy this 
loyalty, and if we had to pay for the effort the volun- 
teers expend on the Town's behalf, then our yearly 
budget would be considerably higher. This volunteer 
effort is unique to Chelmsford and it is the primary 
reason why our Programs are successful. 

We will not embark on an expansive development 
program, but we will continue to provide needed 
programs on a slow, steady basis, working with 
volunteers and partially funded by interested groups. 
We can bring our facilities and our Programs to the 
level desired by residents, and with the help of the 
Community we will succeed on your behalf. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Dempster, Jr., Chairman 
Alfred Woods Paul Murphy, Vice Chairman 

Haworth Neild Sherburne C. Appleton 

Russell Kerr, Director Harry Ayotte 

Evelyn Newman, Robert Charpentier 

Administrative Assistant 



YOUTH CENTER ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE 

YOUTH CENTER 

The Chelmsford Youth Center has completed its fifth 
year of successful operation. With the acquisition of the 
Quessy building and the development of new programs 
it has been a very busy year for the Youth Center, its 
participants, staff and Advisory Committee. 

The McFarlin Center (located in the McFarlin 
School in the Center) hours were expanded to five 
evenings per week (Monday through Friday) early in 



1975. Special "Coffeehouse" programs featuring local 
talent as well as films occurred in an open air fashion 
throughout the summer. Special field trips to art 
museums and fairs, a winter ski trip to Mt. Ascutney, 
Vermont, a trip to Nantasket Beach and Paragon 
Park and a climb up Mt. Monadnock highlighted 1975. 
Regular weekly programs of arts and crafts, films 
and athletic events were planned and successfully 
carried out. A complete gymnastics program was the 
high point of the 1975 athletic offerings under the 
competent direction of Mr. Michael Fay, the Youth 
Center Athletic Supervisor. The addition of a 6' cage 
ball to the Youth Center equipment created many 
hours of strenuous play. Ultimate frisbee (frisbee 
football) was another very popular activity. Other 
athletic programs included volleyball, basketball, 
weightlifting and track events. A continuous arts & 
crafts program featuring simple crafts was offered a 
minimum of three days each week at the McFarlin 
Center. 

The arts and crafts program met with a very good 
response from the youth participants. Under the 
direction of Chief Supervisor, Ms. Andrea Johnson, 
staff members Ms. Robin Bowen (CETA) and Ms. Pat 
Crowell operated the crafts program that emphasized 
projects that could be completed in a single evening 
and resulted in a work of value. 

The weekly film program under the direction of Mr. 
Larry Noyes (CETA) has become a regular feature at 
the Youth Center in 1975. Through the generous 
assistance of the Adams Library many free films have 
been acquired from the Boston Public Library on a 
weekly loan basis. 

Another significant service the Youth Center has 
been able to offer was shuttle transportation from 
outlying areas of Town to the McFarlin Center. The 
Council on Aging very generously offered the use of 
their van three evenings per week. This has enabled 
many youth to get to and from the Center that would 
not have been able to before. The Youth Center Council 
and the Advisory Committee voted to show its ap- 
preciation for the use of the van by purchasing a 
special vacuum cleaner to maintain the van. Staff 
members Mr. Larry Noyes and Mr. Keith Withycombe 
(CETA) have been sharing the evening driving 
responsibilities. Both men functioned as back up 
drivers for the COA van in case of illness of the regular 
driver during 1975. 

During 1975 the Youth Center sponsored many 
special events. With the direction of the staff a series of 
youth dances and concerts were operated. In the spring 
of 1975, the Chelmsford Jayceettes, produced a full 
stage play, GODSPELL, to benefit the Youth Center. 
Youth Center participants assisted the production with 
ticket selling, ushering and general support. 

On the 4th of July the Youth Center, Inc. (a non-profit 
corporation aimed to assist the Youth Center) held its 
annual raffle. Youth participants helped operate the 
booth and sell raffle tickets. Well over $500 was made 
and was used to purchase equipment. Also, during the 
4th of July parade, a strange bunch of clowns appeared 
giving away balloons and entertaining the small 
children along the parade route. This was a group of 
youth participants and staff members sharing their 
new found dramatic skill "clowning." 

The Youth Center Advisory Committee spent an 
active year working on the long range goals for the 
Youth Center as well as supervising the Youth Center 
operation. With the acquisition of the Quessy building 



in the last month of 1975 much energy was spent 
preparing that building for program use in January of 
1976. During 1975 the Advisory Committee also spent 
much time evaluating staff performance and con- 
sidering ways of improving the overall operation of the 
Center. At the Committee's direction two thirds of the 
staff now has Red Cross First Aid training, insuring 
that during the operation of any Youth Center 
Program, First Aid assistance is available. This fall 
the staff has been supported by the intern program in 
human services of Middlesex Community College. One 
intern from Middlesex Community College. One intern 
from Middlesex worked 8 hours per week assisting in 
Youth Center operation at no cost to the Town. Also, in 
conjunction with local colleges, the Advisory Com- 
mittee explored the possibility of staff mem- 
ber/students participating in Federal Work-Study 
programs and beginning in January of 1976 at least one 
staff member's salary was subsidized at the 80% level 
by this program. 

Looking toward the future, 1976 promises to be a very 
exciting year for the Youth Center. The Quessy 
building will move toward total use and by April of 1976 
it will, hopefully, be used four days per week. The 
Youth Center, Inc. has committed itself to raise a 
substantial sum of money to help refurbish the Quessy 
building to meet Youth Center program needs. Other 
new programs in drama, more involved arts and 
crafts, photography, ceramics and others are planned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Garry F. Wolcott 
Youth Center Coordinator 

YOUTH CENTER ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Melvin Petersen, Chairman 
Everett Brown Judy Karrow 

Norman Douglas William Murphy, Selectman 

Thomas Dougherty Brian Sullivan 

Jan Greeno Paul Snyder 

Robert Hall JoAnn Weisman 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

BUILDING INSPECTOR, Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 

Local Inspector Senior Clerks 

Charles N. McArthur Dorothy A. McDonough 

Linda Gauthier 
The following is a report of the Building Inspection 
Dept. for the year 1975: 

There were 369 Building Permits issued: 
196 Occupancy Permits issued: 
138 Certificates of Inspection issued: 
82 Yard Sale permits issued: 
165 Business Establishments inspected: 
The types of Building Permits issued are listed 
below : 



No. of 




Permits Type Issued 


Est. Value 


89 Dwellings valued ai 


$2,648,245.00 


116 Additions valued at 


445,383.00 


41 Remodelings valued at 


222,890.00 


51 Swimming Pools valued at 


155,587.00 


17 Utility sheds valued at 


5,916.00 


22 Signs valued at 


11,820.00 


1 Storage Building valued at 


31,500.00 


1 Siding valued at 


1,200.00 


2 Commercial remodeling valued at 


26,000.00 


1 Poultry shed valued at 


150.00 



3 Greenhouses valued at 

3 Barns valued at 

2 Stables valued at 

6 Fireplaces valued at 

5 Garages (unattached) 

5 Demolitions valued at 

1 Foundations valued at 

369 Permits with estimated value of 



2,550.00 
3,650.00 
2,000.00 
5,920.00 
15,100.00 
2,000.00 
6.200.00 



$3,586,111.00 



Amount of Salary appropriation for Zoning 
Bylaw Officer and Inspector of Buildings - 
July 1, 1975-JuneliO, 197(i $15,852.20 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Building Permits: 16.864.UU 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Occupancy Permits: 4.950.00 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Certificate of Inspections: 4.300.00 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Yard Sale Permits: 82.00 

Total paid to the Town of Chelmsford by 
Ihe Building Inspectors office: 26.196.00 

Amount disbursed from office expense 1.411.89 

Number of Zoning Violations inspected :j22 

Telephone Inquiries 9.560 

Other Departments assisted during 1975 
Board of Selectmen 
Fire Department 
Police Department 
Highway Department 
Town Counsel 
Board of Health 
Conservation Committee 
Board of Appeals 
Historic District Commission 

The year 1975 was more eventful and active than the 
previous year of 1974, mainly due to the im- 
plementation of Chapter 802, the State Building Code. 

As reported to you in the 1974 Annual Town Report, 
the estimated 400% workload increase became a 
reality and additional staffing changes will be 
required. 

Office space was increased some 120 sq. ft. and it 
appears at this writing that this sum will not be 
adequate. 

During the coming year a reorganization of In- 
spectors will take effect, placing the Wire, Gas and 
Plumbing Inspectors in the Building Inspection 
Department. This reorganization should bring about 
the benefits of Consolidated records keeping, more 
coordinated inspection efforts and a more manageable 
inspection system in general. 

To reflect back on the past year, we did expect that 
the implementation of the State Building Code would 
have its effects felt in the Town of Chelmsford. This 
indeed proved to be correct. I am happy to report that 
some of the adversities in this new Code have been 
corrected by amendments to the code, others however 
remain to be resolved. Therefore: It is our hope 
through continued cooperation with all those adversely 
affected by the code that adequate solutions to the 
problems can and will be forthcoming. 

As the Inspector of Buildings, I thank all those town 
departments that contribute and assist me throughout 
the year so readily. I also thank the townspeople of 
Chelmsford for their past cooperation and look forward 
to serving them in the coming year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 
Inspector of Buildings 



69 



VANDALISM COMMITTEE 

A lighting survey of Forefathers' Cemetery and the 
Varney Playground is being conducted by the Electric 
Company in light of the heavy vandalism there. The 
National Sheriffs' Association "NEIGHBORHOOD 
WATCH" program, a neighborhood information and 
self-surveillance program, is presently being con- 
sidered as a civic project by a local service club. 

The School Committee regulations on the use of the 
property will be presented as a Town Bylaw at the 
Town Meeting so that they can be duly recognized by 
the courts. A pamphlet, identifying all the various 
recreation areas in the community and their 
regulations, is presently scheduled for printing in the 
early Fall. 

William R. Murphy, Chairman 
Harry Ayotte, Robert McManimon 

Donald Gray William Reynolds 

Paul C. Hart Charles Watt 

Robert Howe Gary Wolcott 

Capt. Campbell and Chief Germann - Police Dept. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

As Sealer of Weights and Measures for the Town of 
Chelmsford, I wish to submit my report for the past 
year, 1975. 

In performing my duty, I have sealed the following: 

181 Gasoline Meters 
2 Oil and Grease Meters 
27 Scales - 100 to 5,000 Pounds 
66 Scales - More than 10, Less than 100 Pounds 
17 Scales - 10 Pounds or Less 
97 Avoirdupois Weights 

Money received from seals, the sum of $619.70, has 
been turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anthony C. Ferreira 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



363 



WIRE INSPECTOR 

There were 412 applications for wire permits issued 
in 1975. Some of these requiring several inspections 



Inspections made for wire permits 

TYPE OF INSPECTIONS 

Commercial & Industrial buildings 
Residential buildings 
Service chgs., dryers, pools, relocations 
etc. 

Other inspections made by the Wire Inspector 

Mass Electric - releasing services 
Zoning bylaws - electric fences, etc. 
Fire damage 

Police and Highway Dept. - signs 
Tenant complaints 
Water serv. change - grounding 
Code Information - telephone inquiries 
Periodic Inspections - Theaters, Assembly halls 
churches, night clubs, residential over 2 
family, lecture halls, public pools, 
Institutional, schools, signs, etc.. 



sued 
ions. 


Number of dog bites 60 
Number of premises keeping cattle 9 
Number of ca ttle 220 
Number of horses 62 
Number of sheep 14 
Number of swine 377 


843 


Respectfully submitted, 


NO. 


Martin A. Gruber, D.V.M. 


256 
224 


DOG OFFICER 



Respectfully submitted 

Harold Tucke 
Wire Inspector 



GAS INSPECTOR 

There were 386 permits issued in 1975 
Total fees collected : $2,402.00 

There were 601 inspections made by the Gas Insp. 
Salary paid $2,429.98 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neal Stanley 
Gas Inspector 



The following is a report of my services as Dog 
Officer for the year 1975: 



Stray dogs sold to individuals 
Stray dogs sent to medical schools 
Stray dogs disposed of 
Total strays picked up 

Complaints investigated 
Miscellaneous calls 
Dead animals picked up 
Miles Traveled 
Lost dogs returned to owners 



48 
137 

25 
210 

842 

3,186 

363 

24,690 

96 



Respectfully submitted, 

Frank Wojtas 
Dog Officer 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

COMMISSION MEMBERS: John Balco, Florence 
Gullion, Donald House, Robert Howe, Janet Lombard, 
John McCormack and Jane McKersie. 

WETLAND PROTECTION ACT 

This year, as in past years, the Chelmsford Con- 
servation Commission has found the Wetlands 
Protection Act takes up more and more of our time. In 
1975 thirteen hearings were held with as many requests 
for determinations submitted to the Commission. 
Contractors are beginning to come before the Com- 
mission with their plans before work commences, 



rather than wait until a Cease and Desist Order has 
been issued by the Commission because of a possible 
violation of the Wetlands Protection Act. This action on 
the part of the contractors saves both time and money 
for themselves and for the Commission. 

WINTER WEEKEND 

The first annual Winter Weekend was held utilizing 
the Town's Reservations. This activity was sponsored 
by the Conservation Commission, the Jaycees, the 
Recreation Commission and the Youth Center. Limited 
skating was available on Swains Pond, there was 
extensive skating on the Crooked Springs Brook 
Reservation and many adults and children enjoyed the 
additional skating area available because of the dam. 
Snowshoe racing was held at the George B. B. Wright 
Reservation. The Commission was privileged to have 
Mr. Lester Ball on hand to award the winners with 
ribbons. Cross-country skiing was held at Robert's 
Field as well as various skating events. "Smokie the 
Bear" was on hand at Robert's Field to enjoy the 
festivities. Snow sculptures were created in people's 
yards and these were judged and prizes awarded in 
various categories. 

NATURAL RESOURCES PLANNING PROGRAM: 

In 1975 the Natural Resource Planning program was 
completed for the Town. The NRPP defines the natural 
resource base of the Community by a method 
developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil 
Conservation Service. Resources are measured in 
terms of quantity, quality and distribution. The NRPP 
was carried out by a committee consisting of three 
members of the Conservation Commission (John 
Balco, Torry Gullion and Janet Lombard) and a 
representative of the League of Women Voters (Carrie 
Fenn). 

The resulting report presents several recom- 
mendations of importance to the wise use of Chelms- 
ford's natural resources. More importantly, however, 
the information gathered as a result of the process can 
be of use in measuring alternative land area in 
Chelmsford and how those uses will impart the Town's 
natural resources. A copy of the report is on file at the 
Adams Library. 

Although the NRPP report is important in iden- 
tifying areas of specific concern to Chelmsford, the 
content was of interest to the Soil Conservation Ser- 
vice. Copies of the report are being prepared by the 
S.C.S. for distribution throughout Massachusetts to 
serve as a model for the potential of the program for 
implementation in other communities. 

OPEN SPACE ACQUISITION: 

The retention of many of the desirable aspects of 
Chelmsford remains the primary goal of the Con- 
servation Commission. A great deal of time is spent by 
the Commission on land acquisition, either obtained 
through gifts or by purchase. 

Many of the purchases made by the Town included a 
self-help application to the state. $11,000.00 was 
received during 1975 as a reimbursement to the Town 
from our Swains Pond Reservation application. 

New land acquisitions this year includes a 30 acre 
addition to the Lime Quarry Reservation and a five 
acre gift of land across the street from the Lime 
Quarry was also obtained. Also acquired was a large 
parcel of land along Stoney Brook, several lots on 



Winter Street and several smaller parcels which 
enlarged the Wright Reservation. These were acquired 
through outright purchase and as gifts. 

The 9.25 acre Middlesex Canal property which is 
located off Canal Street, is in the final stages of 
acquisition and is being handled by Town Counsel. Self- 
help funds as well as federal funds have been applied 
for in the purchase of this land. If successful the cost to 
the Town should be about $2,500. 

The Commission is planning to bring before Town 
Meeting a 32 acre tract of land abutting the southwest 
corner of Crystal Lake to be used for the purpose of 
recreation. Obtaining this parcel of land would enable 
the Town to have access to boating, swimming, fishing 
and picnicking in this area. 



RESERVATIONS: 

Once again the Commission has relied on the interest 
of the community for getting the work done on the 
Reservations. John Farina, working on his Eagle 
Badge project for Scouts, spent many hours cleaning 
and marking a complete trail around the Crooked 
Spring Brook Reservation. This effort included many 
boys working under his leadership. Another Scout, 
Harold Carrison, erected a new sign on the Crooked 
Spring Road side of the Reservation as well as a sign on 
Parker Road near the parking area located at the 
George B. B. Wright Reservation. 

The Woodridge Garden Club completed their 
Bicentennial Project of tree planting in the barrow 
area of Crooked Springs Brook Reservation. A small 
plaque is to be erected this spring commemorating this 
project. The Golden Chain Garden Club continued its 
leaf project, concentrating their efforts on a badly 
eroded site in the section of the barrow area of the 
Crooked Springs Brook Reservation. The Golden Chain 
Garden Club as well as the Conservation Commission 
would like to thank the townspeople for their support in 
this effort. 

The Job Youth Corps did some clearing and marking 
of trails on various Reservations. The Corps also 
cleaned the rubbish from brooks running through the 
Reservations. 

A great deal of time and effort was spent by the Boy 
Scout Troop from South Chelmsford in cleaning and 
clearing underbrush from the brook on the George B. 
B. Wright Reservation. 

Several nature walks were conducted on the Deep 
Brook Reservation. Many people from Chelmsford, as 
well as members of the Conservation Commission, 
utilized the land the town is taking by adverse 
possession. 

Two to three hundred trees were planted on the 
Swains Pond Reservation by members of the Com- 
mission under the direction of Bruce Gullion. Un- 
fortunately many of the trees were destroyed due to 
illegal use of trail bikes and snowmobiles. 

There are now four reservations with well marked 
trails and these are the Lime Quarry Reservation 
which is located on Littleton Road, parking available; 
George B. B. Wright Reservation on Parker Road, 
parking available; Crooked Springs Brook Reser- 
vation, Crooked Spring Road; and Deep Brook 
Reservation, which is located off Dunstable Road. 



For the first time the Conservation Commission has 
appointed three volunteer Association Consultants, 
Carrie Fenn, David Merrill and Frank Siraco. These 
people have been a tremendous help to the Commission 
and their efforts have freed regular members to 
engage in a wider variety of duties and complete their 
regular duties in a hopefully more competent manner. 



TREE DEPARTMENT 

The Tree Department is presently having one of its 
most productive years. Over 138 dead or dangerous 
trees of various sizes have been removed. In many 
areas, if the tree being removed is disease free, the 
wood is being cut into useable lengths and left behind 
for the taxpayers' use. This saves some time in hauling 
to the dump plus minimizes use of the landfill. 

This year we are continuing our program of at- 
tempting to prune all trees on one street at a time. At 
the same time removing all dead trees and low ground 
brush. The pruning program has recently been com- 
pleted on Dalton Rd.; Parker Rd.; and Fay Street. I 
also plan to finish Robin Hill Rd. within the year. These 
streets had several complaints by bus and truck 
drivers of low limbs hitting side mirrors and truck 
bodies. Also, residents were concerned about dead 
limbs hanging over the road and their houses. 

Bids for our Spring Tree Planting are about to be 
advertised. I would like to thank all departments for 
their assistance and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Myles J. Hogan 
Tree Warden 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

The Town Forest Committee continued general 
maintenance of the Thanksgiving and Mill Road 
Forests. The Committee also continued its reasearch 
of deed information associated with these properties 
and the small tract on Concord Road. All available 
information indicates the need to establish permanent 
boundaries to protect against encroachment by ad- 
jacent owners. 

Scout groups estimated at over 200 children and 
leaders used the town forests for training and 
education. No fires or damage was noted during the 
year. 

The Committee was consulted concerning proposals 
to consolidate certain town committees into depart- 
ments or activities for more effective administration. 

The Committee hopes to accumulate enough deed 
information in the coming year to be able to determine 
a realistic cost for surveying. In addition, we plan to 
complete a management plan for all properties under 
the control of the Committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bruce S. Gullion 

Kenneth C. Goggin 

John J. Smith 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 

This department's largest expense has been the 
removal of diseased Elms. A contract listing 84 Elms 
has just been recently completed. Every year we make 
an effort to preserve as many of our Elms as possible. 
This year the Lowden Company of Needham, Mass. 
was consulted in regards to Elm preservation. Their 
recommendations were a continuance of many of our 
present methods with the addition of a system of in- 
jection presently being experimented by their com- 
pany in many Eastern States. 

After inquiring with other towns, I found that in some 
areas the program was effective, however, too ex- 
pensive when used on a municipal basis. 

This department plans to continue using pruning and 
various spray methods to control this disease in the 
early Spring of this season. 

Many of our more visible pests still exist, however, 
they will progressively decline seasonally as their 
generations weakens. Past efforts of roadside spraying 
is the only possible control of these various insects. 
However, unless notified by one of our state agencies to 
anticipate a serious problem, no town wide spray 
program will be used in the upcoming season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Myles J. Hogan 

Tree Warden 

TOWN AIDE 

Serving the Townspeople as a social service agent, 
the Town Aide's Department continued, throughout 
1975, to encourage low income residents to participate 
in all anti-poverty programs available in the Greater 
Lowell Area. By acquiring current information 
relevant to each program and its guidelines, active 
recruitment of eligible persons was possible. Fur- 
thermore, a general referral and advocacy service has 
been established in this department on the second floor 
of Center Town Hall. 

The following are examples of the types of programs 
which offered services to Chelmsford residents in 1975 : 

CONCENTRATED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS 

Operates a comprehensive network of services for 
disadvantaged, unemployed. These services include: 
outreach, screening, intake, counselling, testing, 
employability, planning, orientation and occupational 
skill training. The CEP is divided into three com- 
ponents ; 

Versatile - skill training in the areas of automotive, 
clerical, electronic assembly, food service, machine 
shop and welding. 

Operation Mainstream - provides paid work ex- 
perience for unemployed in private non-profit and 
public agencies. Through a positive, regular work 
experience it is hoped that the enrollee will become 
ready for regular employment. 

New Careers - Two year program designed to train 
low income unemployed persons for career in human 
service in such fields as: drug and alcoholism 
rehabilitation, work with elderly and handicapped, 
preschool education, recreation, hospital lab work, 
inhalation therapy, mental health, employment in- 
terviewers and teacher aides. 



NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS 



NUTRITION SERVICES 



Provides work training experience for economically 
disadvantaged youngsters; offering both an in-school 
and an out-school program. Youngsters are placed in 
private non-profit and public agencies. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS 

Head Start Program - provides pre-school children 
from low income families with educational, health, 
nutritional and social services in order to prepare them 
for school and deal with any problems which would 
impede their educational progress. 

Family Day Care Program - provides quality child 
care for children from low income families in which 
child care is a necessity if the parent is to support the 
family. Care is provided in private homes which are 
licensed by the Office for Children. 

ELDERLY PROGRAMS 

Foster Grandparent Program - link up low-income 
elderly persons who want to help provide individual 
care and attention for handicapped children. Foster 
Grandparents work at places such as; Tewksbury 
State Hospital, Bay State Rehabilitation Center, 
Soloman Mental Health, Lowell Day Nursery, and 
Lowell and Dracut Public Schools. 

Retired Senior Volunteer Program - provides low 
income elderly persons with the opportunity to serve 
their community. Volunteers work in public and 
private non-profit agencies, including schools, 
hospitals, libraries, senior centers, police department, 
and nursing homes. 

In addition to seeking increased program par- 
ticipation, this department furthered attempts to 
encourage community involvement by low income 
residents in 1975. Specific efforts were made by the 
Chelmsford Community Action Advisory Committee 
which convened regularly until June. The committee's 
efforts culminated in an educational symposium, held 
in April, which was designed to inform residents of 
available programs. New direction and greater em- 
phasis are needed in this area. Knowledge of programs 
and involvement in the community are necessary if 
low income residents are to effectively exert some 
influence on decisions which effect their lives. In 1976, 
a human service approach with a more diversified 
representation will be organized as an attempt to meet 
the need for community participation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen Robinson 
Town Aide 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging is an organization 
providing services and programs designed to improve 
the quality of life for Town of Chelmsford residents 
who are 60 years of age or older. The following outline 
briefly describes the available programs which offered 
services for elderly residents in 1975. Further in- 
formation relative to these programs may be obtained 
at the Council's office which is located upstairs in the 
Center Town Hall. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 



The Elderly Hot Lunch Program offers a nutritious 
luncheon one day a week for the cost of 50« per meal. 
The luncheon is held each Thursday, (excluding school 
vacation weeks) beginning at 12:30 in the McFarlin 
School Cafeteria on Billerica Road. Menus for the 
upcoming month are published in the Chelmsford 
NewsWeekly. Over 4,000 meals were served in 1975. 

Through volunteer efforts, it is possible to have these 
meals delivered to persons who are unable to come to 
the school. Cost of meals delivered to homes is 50tf, 
payable upon delivery. Since deliveries are made 
exclusively through volunteer efforts, the service is 
limited. However, anyone wishing to have a meal 
delivered should contact the COA office to see if 
arrangements can be made. In addition to the delivery 
of regular weekly meals, volunteers delivered 61 
Easter dinners and 120 Christmas dinners to shut-ins in 
1975. 

TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 

The Council on Aging operates a 12 passenger van 
which provides free round trip transportation within 
the Greater Chelmsford area. Transportation is 
available for almost any need you may have, although 
appointments for medical reasons are given priority. 
In 1975, the COA van served 4,607 elderly residents, 
traveling 25,196 miles. 

Reservations for this service should be made at least 
one day in advance, although last minute medical 
appointments are handled on the same day whenever 
possible. To insure you get the exact time requested, 
however, we recommend calling as soon as the date 
and time for your appointment is known. 

HEALTH MAINTENANCE 

Through cooperative efforts with Merrimack Valley 
Home Care Center, Inc. and the Lowell Visiting Nurse 
Association, the Council has made available regular 
health clinics. The town nurse conducts the clinics 
which offer services such as: blood pressure and 
cardiac status check-ups and assistance with 
medication regimes and diets. The clinics are con- 
ducted every Tuesday at different sites in Town. Home 
visits can be made if necessary. During 1975, 427 
persons were seen by the nurse at the clinics. 
Moreover. 222 home visits were made. 

In addition, special focus clinics are planned and 
provided during the year, including an influenza im- 
munization clinic. This year, 191 elderly residents 
received flu immunization. Dates and times for these 
special clinics are announced in the Chelmsford 
NewsWeekly. There are no charges for the clinics. 

HOME CARE 

Home Care services are available through the COA 
for elders whose problems of health and mobility are 
such that independent living cannot be accomplished 
without assistance. The Chelmsford Council on Aging 
is a sponsoring member of Merrimack Valley Home 
Care Center, Inc., entitling Chelmsford elders to home 
care services. These services include homemaker 
service (light housekeeping, laundry, cooking, shop- 
ping) and chore service (minor home repairs, heavy 
cleaning) as well as assistance with housing and legal 
problems. Mrs. Mary Barron. Senior Aide, is available 



to make home visits and referrals relative to home 
care needs. 1975 statistics record 871 hours spent on 
homemaker service and 271 hours spent on chore 
service for Chelmsford residents. Cost of the services 
vary with personal financial situations. 

RECREATION 

The Council on Aging, together with the Senior 
Citizens, Inc., have made available two types of 
recreational programs: regularly scheduled events 
(held at the Elks Hall, Littleton Road) and a full 
schedule of excursions, ranging from half-day trips to 
the theatre to day-long scenic trips, all the way up to 
seven-day ocean cruises. 

The excursions are available to Senior Citizen Club 
members only. There is no set schedule for these trips, 
of course, but usually three or four trips are scheduled 
ahead of time, giving sufficient notice to anyone in- 
terested in making reservations. Announcements are 
published in the Chelmsford NewsWeekly. Since most 
trips are sold out quickly, the Council suggests you 
make reservations as soon as possible. Reservations 
must be made with the program chairman of the 
Senior Citizens Club, Inc. Contact the Council's office 
for specific information. 

The second variety of recreational programming is 
in the area of regularly scheduled events arranged by 
the Senior Citizens Club. A drop-in center is available 
every Tuesday at the Elks Hall on Littleton Road, 
offering activities such as bingo, cards, dancing, etc. 
Parties at the hall are planned regularly throughout 
the year. 

An arts and crafts class is held each Monday morn- 
ing from 10:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon at the Unitarian 
Church in Chelmsford Center. A variety of projects is 
undertaken, insuring an interesting and rewarding 
program of activities. A Fall Fair and Fourth of July 
Fair are held each year, where items which have been 
handmade are put up for sale. In addition this year, a 
Christmas Party for the Chelmsford Head Start Class 
was sponsored where handmade hats and mittens were 
given to the children. 

COMPANIONSHIP SERVICES 

For elders living alone or in a nursing home, simple 
loneliness can sometimes be as difficult to bear as is 
physical illness. Many requests for friendly visitor- 
volunteers were received this year through the COA 
office. The Council is constantly looking for volunteers 
who would be interested in providing companionship 
for others. 

To learn more about this particular area of service, 
or if you wish to be a volunteer, please call the Coun- 
cil's office. 



SNOW SHOVELING 

In 1975, Snow Shoveling Services for the elderly were 
made available. This service is also a volunteer ser- 
vice which is provided by local youth organizations. In 
most cases help is almost immediate. 

DISCOUNTS 

A number of businesses offer discounts to elderly 
residents, but identification is necessary. An iden- 
tification card may be obtained at the Town Clerk's 



office in the Town Hall. This card provides proof of age 
and residency and is free of charge. In addition, a list 
of stores which participate in the discount program is 
available, however, a periodic check with us as to its 
current status is recommended. Transportation 
discounts are available to elderly residents including 
discounts on Boston commuter busses, MBTA and 
other communities' transit programs. 

INFORMATION, REFERRAL, PERSONAL AF- 
FAIRS ASSISTANCE 

Information on services and programs of other 
agencies available in the area is provided through the 
Chelmsford Council on Aging. Other personal 
problems (housing, income, family, nursing homes, 
Social Security, etc.) are handled by members of the 
staff. Home visits can be made if you cannot leave your 
home. 

In addition to working toward the successful 
operation of these programs, the Council attempted, in 
1975, to acquire a permanent facility suitable for use as 
a drop-in-center. The search for a drop-in-center 
stemmed from an awareness of the increasing size of 
the Town's elderly population and its needs. The 
availability of a facility where elderly programs could 
be consolidated would result in a more comprehensive, 
efficient network of rendering services. As a result, a 
Community Development Block Grant application for 
funding to renovate the Old South Row School House 
was filed, but denied. However, efforts will continue in 
the coming year to acquire such a centralized facility 
for the elderly. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gula Boyce, Chairman 
Louise Bishop, Vice-Chairman William Clarke 

Kathleen Robinson, Secretary Clarence Dane 

Joan Arcand, Treasurer Lillian Gould 

Christine Ahem Mary McAuliffe 

Charlotte Bovill Edna Nelson 

HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Chelmsford Home Rule Advisory Committee is 
appointed by the Chelmsford Board of Selectmen for 
the following purposes: 

1. Report on pending legislation that would have an 
effect upon the Town. 

2. Suggest language for response by the Selectmen 
to pending legislation. 

3. Distribute pertinent bills to Town bodies. 

4. Suggest legislation to be filed on behalf of the 
Selectmen. 

5. Inform Town boards of enacted legislation that 
affects them. 

6. Advise Selectmen on Town policies and bylaws, 
recommending changes where appropriate. 

7. Conduct special studies at the request or ap- 
proval of the Selectmen. 



Responding to the objectives as set down above, the 
HRAC has been active in the following areas during the 
past year: 



- Reached goal of having the Town Bylaws updated to 
a current level, and printed in an easier to use manner. 

- Have submitted two articles for the Annual Town 
Meeting. One concerned with Conflict of Interest, the 
other on Referendum Processes. 

- Reviewing the possibility of being able to have a 
Recall Procedure passed and written into the Bylaws. 

- Saw the enactment of the law changing the Plan- 
ning Board term of office from a five (5) to a three (3) 
year term. 

- Updated and are having printed a new edition of the 
Appointed Committee Handbook. 

- Looking into and advising the Selectmen of the 
possibility of dissolving the Town Forest Committee. 

- Will print a Citizens Guidebook. Written to help 
Chelmsford citizens understand and better use their 
Town government more efficiently. 

- Study the Initiative Petition Process. Reported to 
the Selectmen that this process did not need change. As 
written it allows any ten registered voters to put ar- 
ticles and questions on their town warrant. 

- Research and advise Selectmen on the legal 
possibility of changing or using Sinking Fund money 
elsewhere. 

- Report on grouping articles at Town Meeting. It 
was suggested that this not be incorporated into our 
Town Meeting. Reasons being Town Meeting 
procedures would not be improved from what is now in 
use. 

- Study the possibility of the Town's use of voting 
machines in all elections. 

In closing I would like to thank all Boards and 
Committees in Chelmsford for their help and support 
received in the past year. I also want to thank the other 
members of this committee for their dedicated work in 
helping this committee reach its goals. 



Carol Stark 
Robert Stallard 
John MacPhee 



Gerald Silver 

Mort Farber 

Jean-Paul Gravell 

Respectfully submitted, 

Denis Valdinocci, Chairman 



ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY 
COUNCIL 



Northern Middlesex Area Commission 

U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 

State Representative Lois Pines Office - Bottle Bill 

Massachusetts Audubon Society 

128 West Refuse Recovery Council 

Local Departments & Boards 

Studies have been done for the Chelmsford Board of 
Health regarding mosquito problems in the Town and 
this resulted in submission of an article for the Town 
Warrant with unanimous agreement of both groups. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, a com- 
prehensive study was done on the expansion of the 
Town recycling program with emphasis on reduction 
of trash volume and alternative methods of waste 
disposal. Meanwhile, the present recycling of paper, 
glass and cans was expanded and brought revenue to 
the Town. 

Continued studies are under way in the areas of road 
salting, sewage disposal, waste disposal and recycling 
education. 

The Town Purchasing Agent has been of invaluable 
assistance in locating and pricing equipment for our 
studies. The League of Women Voters ably assisted in 
obtaining signatures for the State Bottle Bill and has 
been supporting the Town's recycling efforts. 

The Environmental Advisory Council again thanks 
those citizens who cooperated with the recycling ef- 
forts, reminds all townspeople of the mandatory paper 
separation ordinance, and urges their participation in 
the entire recycling program. Recycling not only saves 
resources and energy - it saves dollars. 

NORTHERN MIDDLESEX AREA 
COMMISSION 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission is a 
public body created by and for the eight towns and one 
city that make up the greater Lowell area. The 
Commission consists of twenty-seven local people: one 
from each Planning Board; one from each Board of 
Selectmen; one from the Lowell City Council; and one 
alternate from each community designated by the 
Manager in Lowell and the Selectmen in the towns. 

The Commission provides policy leadership to a staff 
of planning professionals and technicians, and meets 
monthly at its 144 Merrimack Street, Lowell Office. 
The public is always welcome to attend these 
meetings. 

Generally, the work of the Commission can be best 
described in the following four categories: 

1. COMPREHENSIVE REGIONAL PLANNING 



Donald H. Caless 

Richard B. Codling 

Ina B. Greenblatt, Chairperson 

Dr. Ethel N. Kamien 



Diane M. Lewis 

Dr. Clara M. Refson 

Dorothy A. Stumpf 

Mary M. Wadman 



The Environmental Advisory Council has had a busy 
year monitoring and keeping abreast of current in- 
formation from groups such as: 

Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project 
Mass. DPW Experimental Program for Snow & Ice 
Control 



This is the essence of NMAC's statutory mandate set 
out in Chapter forty-B of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. By "comprehensive," we mean that plans are 
developed and designed to carry forward an agreed-to 
policy toward the entire complex of problems and 
opportunities that characterize our area. Com- 
prehensive planning assures that a plan for one func- 
tion (for example, environmental protection) will not 
frustrate and undermine a plan for another function, 
(for example, economic development) but rather 
support and complement it. The underlying policy is, of 
course, a value judgement arrived at by the Com- 



mission. The Commission does not take its policy 
position in a vacuum. As a group, the Commissioners 
hear the views of the State and Federal governments 
and, individually, they bring forward the community 
point of view. Staff add data and analysis to the 
deliberations, which results in the Commission's ex- 
pression of regional values in terms of policies, goals, 
and objectives. These are further defined in a land use 
plan which unites diverse functional plans into a single 
form. The Commission has available land use plans, 
relevant data concerning our area, and statements of 
policy, goals, and objectives. These are updated on a 
continuing basis. 

2. REFINEMENT OF FUNCTIONAL PLANS FOR 
IMPLEMENTATION 

This aspect of our work and all others occur only 
within the context of the comprehensive planning 
policy discussed above. Occasionally, detailed findings 
from this closer examination of a particular problem 
result in revisions of underlying policy, but for the 
most part, the result is short and long range programs 
to give force and effect to the comprehensive policy. 
Thus, it is understood that NMAC's detailed plans for 
housing, transit improvement, water supply, high- 
ways, economic development, environmental 
protection, and other functional concerns, will be 
consistent with each other and with the comprehensive 
planning policy. Major work undertaken in 1975 in- 
cluded: a comprehensive multi-level transportation 
plan; a transit development program; and a water 
quality management plan which deals with both direct 
and indirect sources of pollution. Also, the Commission 
has pending designation of the area for Federal 
Economic Development District benefits. 

3. PROJECT REVIEWS AND CLEARINGHOUSE 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

To comply with Federal and State statutes, the 
Commission reviews, as a prerequisite for funding, 
most project and program applications for Federal 
grants and aids, as well as projects to which the 
Commonwealth's environmental review statute ap- 
plies. In most cases, the NMAC review is advisory, but 
in a few, the Federal granting agency requires con- 
sistency with area-wide plans. It should be noted that 
this regional planning review applies to State and 
private applicants as well as to city and towns. 

At the same time NMAC is reviewing for regional 
significance, the proposals are circulated to other local 
agencies which might be interested. Often, this is the 
only source of information about State and private 
sponsored projects that may directly affect a 
municipality. During 1975 over $120 million worth of 
such projects were reviewed including Comprehensive 
Employment and Training Act (CETA) funds, several 
Community Teamwork, Inc. programs including 
Headstart, housing rehabilitation and deleading funds, 
as well as a lengthy listing of additional programs. 

4. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 

As a means for refining and applying plans, while 
providing needed services to local agencies, the 
Commission sets aside staff time to assist its members 
to advance locally initiated programs and projects. In 
many cases, the essential data and analysis have 
already been prepared in conjunction with Com- 
mission planning work, and need only to be shaped to 
the local need. 



In a few instances, the community project requires 
extensive surveys and research. This more extensive 
commitment is made (budget permitting) only if the 
project will have value to the other member com- 
munities. Although NMAC has not entered into sup- 
plementary contracts with its members to provide 
planning services, this is a possibility, provided the 
services fall within NMAC overall comprehensive 
planning policies. 

There are also frequent demands by State, Federal, 
and private or quasi public agencies for technical 
assistance. Data for potential investors in the area, 
reviews of State recreation plans, and population 
projections for health planning are examples. 

During 1975, NMAC's technical assistance program 
focused on the new Community Development Block 
Grant Program replacing many of the old U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development 
grants. In addition to general guidance in the 
preparation of applications and documentation, NMAC 
staff was directly involved in the submission of seven 
applications from our member communities. 

Staff also responded to local requests from: the 
Planning Board on proposed Department of Com- 
munity Affairs planning study projects; the Sewer 
Commission on sewer and treatment plan proposals 
and investigation of its outfall; the Housing Authority 
on a housing assistance plan and elderly housing 
proposals, as well as Section 8 housing assistance; the 
Town Planner on various requests for census and 
statistical data; the Historical Commission on 
acquisition of a portion of the Middlesex Canal; the 
Conservation Commission on flood insurance; and the 
Selectmen on traffic control and town center cir- 
culation. 

5. BUDGETS AND A BALANCED PROGRAM 

NMAC's ability to carry out the full range of services 
described above is a budgetary matter to a great ex- 
tent. The Commission recognizes the importance of a 
balanced program. Recently, the increased Federal 
emphasis on water quality and transit and highway 
planning has resulted in substantial grants to prepare 
and refine functional plans in these areas of concern. It 
should be noted that these grants were made to NMAC 
because we are a comprehensive planning agency. 

During 1975 over $261,259 was expended under the 
following Federal grant contracts: U.S. Department of 
Housing & Urban Development $30,000, Mass. 
Department of Public Works/Federal Highway Ad- 
ministration $56,000, U.S. Department of Tran- 
sportation, Urban Mass Transportation Ad- 
ministration, $215,550, Mass Department of Public 
Works, Bureau of Solid Waste, $6,000, Lowell Regional 
Transit Authority, $14,885, Mass Department of Public 
Works/Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, $5,000, Council on 
Aging Bus, Inc., $7,368, U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency, $456,840, City Development Authority, $12,000. 

To match those grants and to provide local services 
$60,000 was provided by the NMAC member com- 
munities. $8,592.00 was Chelmsford's share. 

6. PROSPECTS 

The Commission believes it is of paramount im- 
portance that area-wide planning be a cooperative 
intermunicipal process, based upon regional values 



expressed by people responsible in the ultimate to the 
voters of the area. 

There have and will continue to be proposals to ac- 
complish area-wide planning through sub-state or 
quasi-public agencies. It seems to us that this approach 
blurs the responsibility and makes insensitivity to local 
concerns more likely. The Commission aruges that 
locally directed regional planning is protective of local 
prerogatives, given that there are problems and op- 
portunities that are solvable or realizable only on an 
area-wide basis. 

There are many critical problems begging for action 
in an area-wide context in our area. Our economy, solid 
waste, water supply, transportation, land use, and 
water quality are a few. The Commission will continue 
to advise on the appropriate actions and provide the 
area-wide context. However, it is our member com- 
munities which must carry out those plans, and press 
our State and Federal officials to help. If our member 
communities will strive to work together on common 
problems, those who look to strong mid-level govern- 
ment to solve area-wide problems will have little 
support. NMAC is always available in an advisory 
capacity to work with every local board and agency to 
expedite actions and develop programs and projects 
that will benefit both the community and the area. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip L. Currier, Selectman 

Eugene E. Gilet, Planning Board 

John Kenney, Alternate 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Chelmsford Arms, our first and only elderly housing 
project, has been operational since May 1, 1974. During 
the twenty months of tenant occupation we have had a 
total of seven apartment turnovers. Applications are 
still being accepted, processed and eligible applicants 
placed on our waiting lists. Our preliminary ap- 
plication for a second elderly housing project has been 
placed on file at the present time but will be recon- 
sidered by the Department of Community Affairs when 
more funds are made available for financial 
assistance. 

Remodeling of the community residence at 34 
Middlesex Street in North Chelmsford has been 
completed. This property is leased to the Greater 
Lowell Association For Retarded Citizens as a com- 
munity residence for retarded women and is con- 
sidered by the handicapped division of the Department 
of Community Affairs as one of the finest of its kind 
under their supervision. 

Authority plans to expand their participation in the 
"scattered site" concept for the Low Income Rental 
Assistance Program (Ch. 707) did not materialize. 
Rent subsidy funds from the Department of Com- 
munity Affairs for this program were unavailable for 
the increase the Authority had anticipated. In order to 
operate within the limits of our alloted funds for this 
program, the Authority was compelled to decrease the 
number of units under lease from the nine of last year 
to eight units for the current fiscal year. Chelmsford 
did not receive a direct allotment of funds for leasing 
units under a similar program by the U.S. Department 
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD Section 8) 
but has been included by the Department of Com- 
munity Affairs in their adminstration of the Section 8 



program in the Northern Middlesex area. This 
Authority is looking forward to the possibility of direct 
funding for the Section 8 program in the next fiscal 
year. 

Our gratitude goes to the people of the Town and the 
Town Officials for their continued support and interest 
in our work. Our meetings are held the second Tuesday 
of each month in the Community Building of Chelms- 
ford Arms at 1 Smith Street and all meetings are open 
to the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 

Robert Hughes 

Richard L. Monahan 



RuthK.Delaney 
Robert W.Boyd 



FLOOD PREVENTION STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

The Flood Prevention Study Committee was active 
in several areas during 1975. Information concerning 
drainage and flooding problems was gathered and 
organized. A survey of Town departments and agen- 
cies provided information relative to the Town's ability 
to cope with these problems. State and Federal 
agencies contributed information on available 
financial and technical assistance for examining the 
problems in detail as well as taking corrective 
measures. A written report to the selectmen containing 
the Committee's findings and recommendations is 
planned. 

During the past year, the Committee responded to a 
number of specific inquiries concerning poor drainage 
and flood hazards. A response was made to the 
Planning Board concerning the effect on drainage and 
flooding of new zoning changes contained in the 
proposed Master Plan. The Committee participated in 
the meeting sponsored by the selectmen which brought 
together Town boards and committees to discuss a 
proposed community-wide drainage study. 

The impact of the HUD Flood Insurance Program 
became more evident during 1975. A number of 
inquiries concerning the program and its impact on 
property transactions were attended to by the Com- 
mittee. The interim HUD Flood Hazard Map was 
examined and corrected. These corrections were 
submitted to HUD in the fall of 1975. A revised map is 
expected to be available by the spring of 1976. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HaroldS. Costa, Chairman 

John E. McCormack 

James K. Rogers 



SEWER COMMISSION 

The Sewer Commission has been in a "hold" state 
regarding recommendations to the Town of a sewer 
program. The original Camp Dresser and McGee 
(CDM) design presented to the Town in 1972, has for all 
intents and purposes, been rejected by the U.S. 
Government, Environmental Protection Agency 
(EPA). The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Division of Water Pollution Control, has essentially 
acquiesced to EPA demands, notwithstanding their 
earlier approval and sanctioning of the CDM design. 
The basis for EPA rejection was the enforcement of the 



general requirement to incorporate all of Greater 
Lowell into a regional program. The specific problem 
with Chelmsford's CDM design pertained to the 
sewage treatment plant outfall pipe. Treatment ef- 
fluent from this pipe is feared to concentrate con- 
tamination in the Merrimack River in close proximity 
to the Lowell water intake and other areas along the 
river shore designated as potential recreational areas. 
EPA and the State are now intending that the planned 
results of an Areawide Wastewater Management Study 
to be conducted by the Northern Middlesex Area 
Commission (NMAC) form the basis for a regional 
system. 

Town problems associated with water pollution and 
with septic system problems have not gone away. 
Witness to the recent septic pumper discharge 
dilemma attests to the surging need for a permanent 
solution to this aspect of Chelmsford's pollution 
problem. Rescuing the pumpers, by permitting them to 
continue dumping their discharge into a manhole 
discharging directly into the Merrimack River, may 
make the "problem go away" but certainly per- 
petuates a detestable condition. 

Every stream in Town is polluted to unhealthy 
levels. With the growth experienced in the Town, septic 
system problems are continuing to plague residents. 
Septic systems moreover contribute significantly to 
stream pollution, a fact established by water quality 
standard measurements along the streams conducted 
in 1974. 

Businesses in the Town are clamoring for a per- 
manent solution to waste discharge. Capital outlays 
required to individually rectify problems represents a 
debilitating investment by the businesses faced with 
immediate problems and State orders to correct. 
Further growth in the Town, as projected in the new 
Town Master Plan, promoting apartments, new 
business and industry, is predicated on availability of 
appropriate liquid pollution control measures. 

Recent reports during 1975 by the Conservation 
Commission and the Flood Plain Study Committee 
serve to further indicate the acute septic system 
problems. Much of the presently inhabited land in 
Chelmsford is not suitable for proper septic system 
operation. Much of the land available for further 
development is also not suited for septic systems. 
Permitted to grow, unchecked, water quality levels in 
the Town will continue to deteriorate. Our Board of 
Health is taking aggressive action with regard to en- 
forcement of stringent ordinances covering new 
system implementations and repairs to older faulty 
systems. The problem however still continues to 
worsen despite these efforts. 

It is recommended that the Town decide on a policy 
for pollution control. What should be done in the near 
term and what are the long term corrective steps, are 
questions needing answers. What priorities and what 
methods of financing should be adopted for pursuing a 
cost effective program? Who shall be mandated with 
the action to abate pollution and spearhead a positive 
action program? 

The specific work of the Sewer Commission during 
1975 dealt with important sewer implementation 
program issues for Chelmsford. Following the 
recommendations of the Chelmsford Liquid Waste 
Committee Study Report, prepared by the firm of 
Parsons, Brinkerhoff, Quade and Douglas, the Sewer 
Commission initiated further study of the problem of 
providing a sewer system exclusively for Chelmsford 



Center, the most troublesome area in the Town. In 
addition, the Sewer Commission, working in 
cooperation with NMAC helped review program plans 
for the EPA financed, Sec. 208, Area Wastewater Study 
to be conducted by NMAC. Further details of these 
activities are given below. 

A contract was awarded to Lawler, Matusky and 
Skelly engineers in June 1975 in the amount of $13,000 
(1974 funds) for the purpose of studying the feasibility 
of providing sewer service exclusively for the 
Chelmsford Center area. This area was chosen as it 
constitutes a major cause of concern within the Town. 
It became quite evident in the early stages of this 
study, that solving the Chelmsford Center area 
problem exclusively would not be economically viable 
as chances of Federal funding would be very slight. 
Therefore, the study was expanded to include con- 
sideration of the sewerage requirements of the River 
Meadow Brook and other drainage areas to determine 
their impact upon any proposal for the Chelmsford 
Center area. This study concluded: 

1. That the more densely populated the area 
served, the lower the cost per dwelling; 

2. If a sewerage system were properly designed 
to take into consideration future users, the 
yearly cost per dwelling would actually go down ; 

3. North Chelmsford may not be the proper 
location for a sewage treatment plant because of 
(a) proximity of the outfall to the City of Lowell's 
drinking water intake; and (b) prohibitive cost 
of mains and pumping stations that would have 
to be designed and constructed for greater 
quantities of sewage from all points located 
south of the treatment plant. 

The EPA in 1975 funded an Area Wide Wastewater 
Management program under Section 208 of The 
Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 
1972. The program, encompassing the Greater Lowell 
Region is managed under the direction of NMAC. The 
Sewer Commission has been requested, and has 
consented, to serve as technical advisors to NMAC on 
this study. The results of this study will have a far 
reaching impact on Chelmsford in that it will mandate 
a regional sewer system to which any proposed 
Chelmsford system must conform. Schedules, 
finances, designs, discharges and regional interfaces 
are among the more important issues under con- 
sideration. 

One of the first items of consideration under the 
NMAC Section 208 study was the No. Chelmsford 
Sewage Treatment Plant outfall location. Earlier 
designs proposed by Camp Dresser and McGee were 
rejected by EPA since it was feared that Chelmsford's 
treatment outfall was to close to the City of Lowell 
water intake system. At the 1975 Town Meeting, the 
Sewer Commission requested $10,000 (which was 
appropriated) for alternative designs regarding 
location of the outfall pipe. After meetings with NMAC 
it was agreed that this outfall study would be included 
as part of the NMAC Section 208 regional study and 
would be funded by EPA at a direct savings of $10,000 
to the Town. Work is just beginning with a consulting 
firm contracted by NMAC. The Sewer Commission is 
serving as a technical monitor on this contract. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph M. Gutwein 
Chairman 



WATER DISTRICT CONSOLIDATION 
COMMITTEE 



Based on the findings of the "Report to the Water 
District Consolidation Committee" submitted in 
February 1975 by the engineering firm of Weston & 
Sampson, our committee presented its unanimous 
recommendation in favor of consolidation at Chelms- 
ford's May 1975 town meeting. In support of our 
recommendation, we noted the following advantages of 
a consolidated system over Chelmsford's present four- 
district structure: 

1. The opportunity for comprehensive town-wide 
planning of water system developments. 

2. Lower overall water rates for the townspeople as a 
whole. 

3. A probable savings in yearly operating and 
maintenance costs and in improvements costs in the 
forseeable future. 

4. Lower interest rates under a consolidated system. 

5. An increased potential for obtaining federal grant 
money for system improvements. 

6. A more equitable supplying of water to all parts of 
the town. 

7. The opportunity to become part of a regional 
water supply system in the future. 

The Water District Consolidation Committee sub- 
mitted four articles which were passed at the time our 
recommendation was presented. These articles 
authorized the Committee to obtain legal and financial 
advice regarding the best method of establishing a 
municipal water system and to draft proposed 
legislation consolidating the water districts. Pursuant 
to these objectives, we have secured the firm of 
Palmer & Dodge as special counsel to the WDCC, and 
plan to submit proposed consolidation legislation for 
approval at the May 1976 town meeting. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Jo Anne Kelch, Chairman- 
Committee members : 
Jo Anne Kelch, James McKeown - Center District 
Michael Divine, Ronald Pare -- East District 
George Abely, Ira Parks - North District 
David McCarthy, Tom Monteodorisio - South District 
William Murphy -- Selectmen's Representative 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



John C. Alden-chairman-January to September 

Audrey A. Carragher-chairman-October to December 

Richard 0. Lahue, Sr. J. Perry Richardson 

George A. Parkhurst Robert C. Spaulding 

Bertha E. Trubey, Clerk 

Under the authority of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth, this Commission is 
responsible "for the preservation, promotion, and 
development of the historical assets" of Chelmsford. 



Inventorying, which includes research, field survey, 
processing of materials and microfilming, has been 
continuing on historic areas, buildings, structures, 
sites and objects for the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission and for future listing in the National 
Register of Landmarks. Mrs. Jane Drury and her 
committee have completed fifty-three such reports and 
many others are in stages of completion. 

This year with the owner's permission, the Com- 
mission installed plaques on 103 houses and buildings 
which are over 100 years old. These state the original 
owner and the approximate date of construction. 

The Commission, working in cooperation with the 
Historical Society and the Bicentennial Commission, 
held a dedication ceremony for the Byam Match 
Factory Historical Marker. A group of interested in- 
dividuals and organizations donated this granite 
monument and landscaping was completed by the 
Four Seasons Garden Club. This marks the site near 
which the first Lucifer match factory in the United 
States was located just off Robin Hill Road in the South 
Section of Chelmsford. 

The Commission proposed that the name of Lt. Col. 
Moses Parker, a Chelmsford participant in the Battle 
of Bunker Hill, be considered for the Junior High 
School-West and actively worked for its final ac- 
ceptance. A dedication ceremony for the official 
naming of the school was held in cooperation with the 
Bicentennial Commission, the Historical Society, the 
"Old Chelmsford" Garrison House Assoc., the 
Chelmsford Colonial Minutemen and the Chelmsford 
School Committee. 

Assistance and information were given by the 
Commission during the establishment of the Center 
Historic District. Continuing concern has been ex- 
pressed about the protection and preservation of the 
Forefather's Cemetery which is within this area. 

At the conclusion of the Bicentennial year, the 
Commission is prepared to take over the maintenance 
and control of the 1802 Brick School House and the 1832 
Middlesex Canal Toll House. Being actively involved in 
the school house restoration, the Commission was most 
pleased to accept on loan from Mrs. Margaret Mills 
assorted school house furnishings. Pamphlets, guides, 
maps and brochures were prepared by the Commission 
which are available at the Toll House Information 
Center which has been moved to the Town Hall lawn. 

This year the Commission has sponsored a town 
meeting article requesting that three additional roads 
be designated as "scenic roads." 

Plans are being made for the celebration of the 100th 
anniversary of the town clock in the spring. 

The Commission urges those concerned to give 
serious consideration to all alternatives before 
destroying any historically important building or site. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Audrey Carragher, chairman 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Stephen Wojcik, Chairman 

Robert LaPorte, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Richard Lahue Alternates 

Paul Canniff Charles Watt 

John Richardson J . Harold Davis 

The Chelmsford Historic District Commission was 
enacted by the 1975 Town Meeting and its members 
appointed. The Commission has been meeting twice a 
month since September. It has established rules of 
procedure as the state guidelines indicate. One hearing 
for a Certificate of Appropriateness has been held and 
denied. 

It is the intention of the Board to study further areas 
in town that may be included within other Historic 
Districts as well as considering expansion of the 
existing district. Areas of Town to be considered in- 
clude, areas of Turnpike Road and Golden Cove Road, 
South Chelmsford Common Area, and the Mills located 
in North Chelmsford. 

The purpose of the Board has been and will be : 

1. To preserve and protect the distinctive charac- 
teristics of buildings and places significant in the 
history of the Commonwealth and its Towns. 

2. To improve and maintain the settings of those 
buildings and places in the District. 

3. To encourage new designs compatible with 
existing buildings in the District. 

The Commission would like to take this opportunity 
to thank Town boards and employees for their 
cooperation. 

REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS 

COMMISSION 

George Adams Parkhurst, Chairman 
Hedwig H. Zabierek, Clerk 
John C. Alden Richard 0. Lahue 

Audrey A. Carragher Janet Lombard 

Mary J . Guaraldi Charles J. Marderosian 

Walter R. Hedlund Anna F. Normand 

Vincent J. R. Kehoe John Perry Richardson 

Leading up to the Bicentennial Year of 1976, 
Chelmsford's Bicentennial Commission sanctioned 
many Bicentennial activities of local groups during 
1975. In addition, the Commission sponsored, or co- 
sponsored, several other projects. In the following list, 
the co-sponsoring organizations are shown in paren- 
theses. 

Colonial Ball, February 22, 1975 

Restoration of the 1802 Schoolhouse 

Relocation of the Middlesex Canal Toll House to 
serve as an information center 

Publication of a Map and Description of Points of 
Historical Interest 

Bicentennial Banquet, April 22, 1975 

Renaming of the West Junior High School in honor of 
Lt. Col. Moses Parker 

Publication of a Walking Tour Guide to Chelmsford's 
Historic District 

Hike to Concord Bridge, April 19, 1975 (Historic Trail 
Committee) 



Dedication of a Marker at the Site of the Byam 
Lucifer Match Factory (Historical Commission and 
Chelmsford Historical Society) 

Military Review of the 10th Regiment of Foot, April 
20, 1975 (American Contingent of the 10th Regiment of 
Foot) 

Liberty Tree Planting, April 20, 1975 (Chelmsford 
Colonial Minutemen) 

Liberty Tree Lantern Ceremony, April 20, 1975 
(Chelmsford Colonial Minutemen) 

Two Colonial Church Services, April 20, 1975 
(Chelmsford Colonial Minutemen and First Parish 
Church) 

Installation of Signs marking Historic Buildings 
(Historical Commission) 

The Bicentennial Celebration in Chelmsford will 
reach a climax during the Independence Day weekend 
in 1976. Plans are being made for a gala celebration at 
that time under the direction of the Chelmsford 
Colonial Minutemen. 

Local organizations that wish to be a part of the 
Bicentennial should contact the Commission for of- 
ficial sanction. 

U.N. DAY COMMITTEE 

The following is a brief report of Chelmsford's ac- 
tivities celebrating the 30th birthday of the United 
Nations. 

America's Bicentennial Commemoration has three 
major themes - Heritage '76, Festival USA, and 
Horizons '76. 

The first theme. Heritage '76, was related to 
Chelmsford's observance of United Nations Day on 
October 24. Heritage '76 recalls the ethnic origins and 
diversity of America and the fact that our way of life 
owes much to other peoples of the world. It provides a 
unique opportunity to strengthen ties with other 
peoples of the world and thus contribute to in- 
ternational mutual understanding. 

A special Heritage '76/UN Day menu was served in 
the school cafeterias. Displays were planned for each 
school library. 

In their classrooms children related to the Heritage 
'76/UN Day in a number of ways. Sets of large study 
prints in color were also used in primary grades. 
Another meaningful approach employed was to tie the 
celebration to UNICEF. UNICEF's concern and work 
throughout the world is devoted exclusively with the 
needs and problems of the world's children. UNICEF is 
an aspect of the United Nations that our children can 
readily identify with. Arrangements were made with 
the UNICEF Center of Massachusetts to have films 
available dealing with UNICEF's work in Somalia, 
India, or Dahomey. 

Chelmsford residents participated in UN Day ac- 
tivities sponsored by UNA/USA and the World Affairs 
Council of Boston. 

A more comprehensive program is planned for UN 
Day in 1976. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Charles L. Mitsakos 
UN Day Chairperson 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

During 1975 as in recent years, the highlight of the 
local Town Celebrations, focused on the Fourth of July 
Celebration. The Chelmsford Minutemen Coordinating 
Committee, must once again be complimented on their 
excellent planning and administration of the 1975 
Celebration, the Band Concert, Country Fair on the 
Town Common and the Grand Parade on the 4th which 
was attended by several thousands of Greater Lowell 
and Chelmsford residents. To the Chelmsford Art 
Society for the Art Festival, many thanks. The Com- 
mission also must compliment personnel of the Police, 
Fire, Public Works and Park Departments for their 
splendid cooperation to this committee, also special 
thanks to the Chelmsford Auxiliary Police Unit. 

Preparations for the upcoming Bicentennial 
programs are taking shape, as the committee is 
coordinating its plans with the Revolutionary War 
Bicentennial Celebrations Commission for the up- 
coming activities. 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 

Raymond Day 

James K. Gifford 

Richard O.Lahue, Sr. 



Completed Purchase Order Actions 235 

Total Purchase Dollar Value $327,836.42 

Non-Expendable Equipment & Supplies $225,813.37 
( Non-Expendable — recovery dollar factor items) 

All procurement needs referred to the Purchasing 
Agent were processed in accordance with existing 
Town bylaws and State statutes. Procurement ser- 
vices, information and assistance were rendered 
various Town commissions and study committees as 
pertains their actual needs or budget planning. While 
not reflected in the dollar figures mentioned in this 
report, the Purchasing Agent was directly involved in 
such annual requirements as highway materials, fuel 
requirements, service contracts, work order repairs 
and general maintenance needs. Analysis studies in 
the areas of voting machines, gasoline storage, traffic 
signs, sidewalks, landscaping, plowing & snow 
operations and solid waste disposal constituted further 
involvement by the Purchasing Agent. Procurement 
action on road salt needs for Towns of Chelmsford, 
Dracut, Westford, Methuen, North Andover and cities 
of Lowell and Haverhill was prepared by the Chelms- 
ford Purchasing Agent on a cooperative purchase 
proposal basis. Subsequent bid action resulted in an 
estimated six thousand ($6000.00) dollar savings to our 
Town. 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Robert J. Noble, Chairman 

Michael J. Devine Edward H. Hilliard 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, Ex-Officio 

Voting Strength as of December 31, 1975 



Prec. 


Rep. 


Dem. 


Ind. Ai 


ner. Total 


1 


366 


385 


671 


1,422 


2 


199 


429 


469 


1,097 


3 


242 


585 


802 


1,629 


4 


114 


385 


213 


712 


5 


281 


401 


882 


1,564 


6 


276 


486 


544 


1,306 


7 


240 


359 


507 


1,106 


8 


282 


289 


560 


1,131 


9 


123 


354 


513 


990 


10 


237 


497 


956 


1,690 


11 


276 


432 


420 


1 1 , 1 29 


12 


203 


437 


816 


1,456 


Town 






Totals 


2,839 


5,039 


7,353 


1 15,232 



PURCHASING AGENT 

The past year was both productive and satisfying 
from a procurement standpoint. With approval by the 
Board of Selectmen and the cooperation of all Town 
departments, a general trend towards centralized 
purchasing procedures began to take shape. System 
procedures of purchase requisitions, purchase orders 
and purchase order log were implemented. The en- 
suing purchase actions report is submitted in concise 
form. 



While this report indicates an improved purchasing 
trend, Town governments are faced with the need to 
provide even more and better services to an ever- 
changing population. Different life styles and attitudes 
result in different demands to be satisfied. The 
challenge of advanced technology and the need for 
increased economy require that public purchasing 
officials continuously update their technical knowledge 
and purchasing techniques. One of the unique features 
of centralized public purchasing in Town government 
is the complete openness of its operations which 
distinguishes it from private purchasing. Openness of 
public records not only acts as a control in the system 
but fosters confidence in government itself. 

In an effort to meet the immediate need for cen- 
tralized procurement policies and procedures, the 
Purchasing Agent has prepared and submitted a 
comprehensive Purchasing Manual for consideration 
and adoption by the Town of Chelmsford. This pur- 
chasing manual provides the soundest structure for an 
effective centralized purchasing program. The 
magnitude of public purchasing expenditures brings 
into focus the principle of accountability. The manual 
encompasses law, regulation, policy and practice. 
Based on sound principles it is needed to give a proper 
accounting for purchasing activities. 

The Purchasing Agent attended meetings with 
Purchasing Officials and Business Managers from 
other Cities and Towns to keep abreast of the problems 
or improvements taking place in other communities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chris Alexion, Purchasing Agent 



TOWN PLANNER 



The position of Town Planner was established by the 
Board of Selectmen in September 1974 and is funded 
through the Comprehensive Employment and Training 
Act. The basic function of this position is to assist in 
providing sound comprehensive planning for the 
present and future development of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

During 1975, major emphasis was directed toward 
the area of Federal and State "Grant-in-aid" programs 
and several attempts were made to secure a portion of 
these funds for various town projects. 

Application was made to the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development for funds to rehabilitate a 
town-owned structure for use as a Senior Citizen Drop- 
in Center. Unfortunately, due to factors beyond the 
control of local government, the application request 
was denied. 

This office is in the process of refiling to HUD for 
funds to accomplish other sorely needed projects and is 
determined to make all efforts to effect change in the 
rather unjust distribution policies promulgated by 
many Federal Agencies. 

Major accomplishments this year included the 
development of a long range plan for improved 
pedestrian facilities throughout the town which rated 
24 streets as to their relative need for sidewalks over 
the next 20 years. 

A detailed plan for the construction of a walkway 
system in the vicinity of the high school was also 
developed and presented to the Board of Selectmen and 
School Department during November of this year for 
their approval. 

The Middlesex County Engineering Department has 
completed the final design work for the first phase of 
the Town's three year sidewalk construction plan. This 
work, performed by the County will save the Town 
approximately $10,000 in engineering and design fees 
for the first phase alone. The first year plan will be 
presented in the form of an article for the 1976 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

A close working relationship has been maintained 
between this office and various Federal, State and 
Local agencies such as the Office of State Planning, 
Department of Community Affairs and the Northern 
Middlesex Area Commission. In addition, close contact 
with all local Boards, Committees and Commissions 
within the town has avoided much duplication of effort 
and has promoted a general spirit of cooperation in 
many areas of common concern. 

1976 will see a continued effort by this office to secure 
additional Federal or State revenues for the Town in 
order to accomplish such projects as the revitalization 
of the Central Square Business District, Drainage 
improvements and other Community Development 
projects deemed necessary to improve as well as 
maintain the quality of life in Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert W. Flynn, Town Planner 



CAPITAL PLANNING AND 
BUDGETING COMMITTEE 

Eugene J. Doody, Chairman 

John J. Balco Edward G. Krasnecki 

Arnaud R. Blackadar ( to 12/75 ) Donald McGillivray 

Ernest F. Day (Effective 12/75) S. Ira Parks 

Thomas E. Firth 

The Capital Planning and Budgeting Committee is 
charged with the responsibility of studying capital 
improvement needs of the Town and reporting its 
findings to the Town suggesting priorities and 
recommending budgeting methods. The Committee is 
comprised of seven members including the Town 
Accountant, a representative from the Finance 
Commitee, a representative from the Planning Board, 
and four public members. 

During 1975 the Committee completed a survey of all 
major town departments to review and anticipate 
Capital needs for the Town of Chelmsford through 1985. 
The Committee also developed a Schedule of Capital 
Commitments for the Town for the twenty-year period 
ending 1995. 

During 1976 the Committee will review with ap- 
propriate Committees and Agencies capital ex- 
penditures to be requested at Town Meetings. The 
Committee also intends to review the Town's Bond 
Rating and examine methods with appropriate 
governmental agencies for improving this Rating. 
Alternative methods of financing proposals for 1976 
Capital Expenditures will be reviewed to maximize use 
of fund sources and to minimize the impact of 
Chelmsford's tax rate. 

For the Committee, 
Eugene J. Doody 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Members: James A. Sullivan, chairman; Robert 
Sexton, vice-chairman; Harry McKeon, financial 
secretary; Carol eleven, School Committee 
representative; Anthony DeProfio; Richard Miller; 
Carol DeCarolis; Paul Krenitsky; Louis Murray. 

The committee met every other week throughout the 
year at the new Chelmsford High School. 

The main items for consideration were the 
satisfactory completion of punch list items, the in- 
stallation of the remaining moveable equipment and 
the construction of a storage building. 

For a considerable part of the year the committee, 
represented by Atty. James Cassidy, was in litigation 
with the General Contractor, E. C. Blanchard Com- 
pany, over the proper completion of punch list items 
and the quality of some work done during the con- 
struction phase. The litigation was settled out of court 
in August with the S.B.C. retaining enough money to 
complete the building properly and the General 
Contractor agreeing to accept partial payment and 
leave the job. At this time the S.B.C. proceeded to 
complete and correct work on the building on an 
emergency basis with Thomas Carroll, clerk of the 
works, supervising progress. During the following 



months almost all punch list items were finished and 
many nagging problems were solved. Except for very 
few items, which are presently unobtainable, all 
moveable equipment is in place and is functioning 
properly. The tennis courts were opened to the public 
in September. 

Construction of a steel building next to the tennis 
courts was started in late fall. This building will be 
used to store large maintenance equipment and also 
some athletic equipment. 

The committee is pleased that the school is being 
used for many community events and hopes that the 
public and the school children will be on the alert for 
vandals who are damaging this fine building at an 
alarming rate. 

Plans for the coming year include installation of 
additional fencing at the playing fields, installation of 
sidewalks along Graniteville Road, solution of the 
problem at the school pond, and a permanent solution 
to the freezing problem at the sewage treatment 
plant. 

The building committee plans to start work with the 
School Committee soon so that when work is finally 
completed and the school is turned over to the school 
committee the transition will proceed smoothly. With 
few major items left to be completed, the building 
committee feels confident that the total projected cost 
of $9,750,000. for all construction and equipment will 
not be exceeded. It is with pride the committee points 
out that this is well under the original projected cost of 
$10,200,000. 



TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR 

TOWN TREASURER 



Philip J. McCormack 

Town Treasurer - 

Tax Collector 

Balance Dec. 31, 1974 
Receipts to June 30, 1975 

Paid out on Warrants 
Balance June 30, 1975 



Florence M. Ramsay 
Asst. Treasurer 



$ 5,438,305.68 
23,454,132.11 

$ 28,892,437.79 
24,795,445.20 

$ 4,096,992.59 



TAX COLLECTOR 

June 30, 1975 



Levy of 1971: 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 

Levy of 1972 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 

Levy of 1973 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 

Levy of 1974 

Personal Property 
Excise 
Real Estate 
Farm Animal 



$ 198.75 
20,146.86 




$ 1,069.20 

37,900.91 





$ 11,551.10 
64,622.41 
18,767.02 



$ 3,159.28 

134,830.98 

22,362.46 

122.75 



Levy of 1975 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 



$ 13,576.82 
200,033.86 
193,393.24 

$721,735.64 



INSURANCE SINKING FUND COMMISSION 

Year Jan. 1st 1975 - Dec. 31 , 1975 





12/31/74 


Interest 


Cert. Int. 


Bond Int. 


Transfer 


Withdrawal 


12/31/75 


Central Svgs 147159 


$ 3,531.36 


$ 228.57 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 3,759.93 


Central Svgs 174894 


22,444.81 


1,321.45 






4,863.63 


35.00 


28,594.89 


Central Svgs 700148 


20,000.00 




1,470.85 








20,000.00 


Charlestown Svgs. 


3,000.00 




230.28 








3,000.00 


lOMPubServ. N H 


10,312.50 






612.50 






10,312.50 


10MNW Bell Tel 


9,787.50 






625.00 






9,787.50 


10M Hartford Elec. 


9,950.00 






650.00 






9,950.00 


10M Mich Bell Tel 


9,987.50 






637.50 






9,987.50 


10M So Calif Edison 


9,987.50 
$99,001.17 






637.50 
$3,162.50 






9,987.50 




$1,550.02 


$1,701.13 


$4,863.63 


$35.00 


$105,379.82 



Respectfully submitted, 

Insurance Sinking Fund Commissioners 

Eustace B. Fiske 
Kenton P. Wells 
Francis J. Goode 



83 




TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Ernest F. Day 
Appointed September 8, 1975 



Arnaud R. Blackadar 
Retired October 31, 1975 




Enclosed herewith, you will find a Balance Sheet and 
Statement of Disbursements and Receipts for our 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1975. 

During this past year, the Accounting Office has 
experienced a marked increase in the volume of 
transactions that flow through this office. This has 
required additional effort on the part of our capable 
staff not only to maintain accurate accounting records 
but to see that all adhere to Town Bylaws and State 
Statutes. 



The Office of Town Accountant during the period of 
this report was held by Mr. Arnaud R. Blackadar, who 
has retired as of October 31, 1975. Mr. Blackadar held 
this position for many years. The Town has lost a very 
capable and dedicated servant. We all wish him well 
upon his retirement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest F.Day 
Town Accountant 



84 



Town Accountant, Cont. 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF JUNE 30, 1975 



CASH -GENERAL 
Non-Revenue 
Non-Revenue Invested 
Revenue Sharing 

PETTY CASH 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE: 
Taxes-Pers. Prop. 1971 
Taxes-Pers. Prop. 1972 
Taxes-Pers. Prop. 1973 
Taxes-Pers. Prop. 1974 
Taxes-Pers. Prop. 1975 

Taxes-Real Estate 1973 
Taxes-Real Estate 1974 
Taxes-Real Estate 1975 



Taxes 


-Motor Vehicle 


1971 


Taxes 


-Moto 


Vehicle 


1972 


Taxes 


Motor Vehicle 


1973 


Taxes 


Moto 


Vehicle 


1974 


Taxes 


Moto 


Vehicle 


1975 


Farm 


^nima 


1 Excise 




Taxes 


Unde 


Suspens 


ion 


Tax Titles 






TaxPc 


)ssess 


ons 




DEPARTMENTAL: 




Public 


Bldgs 






Ceme 


ery 






Ceme 


ery P 


C 




Highv* 


ay 






Police 


-Extra 


Duty 





AID TO HIGHWAYS: 

State & City Aid Reserve 

CRYSTAL LAKE RECONSTRUCTION 

UNDERESTIMATED-MOSQUITO 

CONTROL 
UNDERESTIMATED-COUNTY 

HOSPITAL 

LOANS AUTHORIZED-Sewer Plans 
Sewer Construction 
1972 High School 

TOTAL ASSETS 



$3,846,227.16 
124,176.14 
38.817.84 
87,771.75 



198.75 
1.069.20 

11,551.10 
3.159.28 

13,576.82 



S4 096.992.89 
275.00 



18,767.02 




22,362.46 




193,393.24 


234.522.72 


20,146,86 




37.900.91 




64.622.41 




134,830.98 




200.033.86 


457,535.02 



32,429.39 
679.72 



752.50 
(29.00) 

2,770.00 
185.00 

7 843.61 



125,000 00 
1.280,000.00 
1.240,000,00 



122.75 

9,172.72 



27,154.42 
6,780.81 

3,836.59 
.01 

2,645,000.00 



LIABILITIES 
PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS-Agency Accounts $ 186,990.45 

TREASURER: 

Uncashed Checks 2,555.78 

Over S Short Acct. 12!389.87 14,945.65 



$7,555,579.30 



SPECIAL ACCOUNTS: 






Conservation Funds 


1,692.08 




Cemetery Funds 


3,293.73 




Road Machinery Fund 


2,841.60 




McFarlin Bequest 


22.60 




Parks for Children 


15.04 


7,865.05 


STATE AID TO: 






Libraries 


12,574.50 




Transportation-Sec. 20 


84,512.00 




transportation Chap. 825 


11,929.31 




Chapter 90 


25,155.75 




Chapter 90 - County 


1,998.67 


136,170.23 


REVOLVING ACCOUNTS: 






School Lunch 


8,274.21 




Athletics 


2,122.67 




Public Law 874 


428,754.24 




Title II 


105.58 




Educ. Collaborative Fund 


19,129.90 




Title III 


19,283.39 




Educational Center 


134,524.24 




Federal Revenue Sharing 


87,771.75 


699,965.98 


NON-REVENUE ACCOUNTS: 






Sale Cemetery Lots 


7,462.50 




Bequests to Perpetual Care 


12,215.00 




Interest P/C Funds 


2,815.30 




Registry Fees 


50.00 




Sale of Dogs - County 


84.00 




Dog License Fees 


1.193.65 




Tax Title Fees 


81.00 




Cash Performance Bonds 


2,630.00 




Historic Commission 


185.00 




Sale of Town Property 


3,999.87 


30,716.32 


OVERLAY: 

Surplus Revenue 


1,907.28 




1969 


40.80 




1971 


3,433.86 




1972 


14,971.83 




1973-74 


39,254.02 




1975 


72,402.20 


132,009.99 


EXCESS ASSESSMENTS: 






County Tax 


67,912.46 




State Parks 


1,302.59 




Pollution Control 


259.95 


69,475.00 



APPROPRIATION BALANCE FORWARD 



SPECIAL PROJECT BALANCES FORWARD 

REVENUE RESERVES UNTIL COLLECTED: 

Petty Cash 275.00 

Taxes Under Suspension 9,172.72 

Tax Titles & Possessions 33,109.11 

Motor Vehicle Excise 457,535.02 

Farm Animal Excise 122.75 

Accounts Receivable 11,551.11 



352,981.00 



SURPLUS REVENUE ENCUMBERED - 1976 
LOANS AUTHORIZED & UNISSUED 



899,979.00 
2,645,000.00 



NON-REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
1972 High School 
Byam School 
Misc. Completed Balances 



80,782.93 
1,281.03 
80,930.02 162,993.98 



SURPLUS REVENUE 

TOTAL RESERVES & LIABILITIES 



1,225,709.77 



s 7, 555, 579.30 



85 



DEBT. STATEMENT 



Bond Issue 




Interest 


Outstanding 


Payment 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 






Rate 


6-30-74 


1975 


6-30-75 


Due 1976 


Due 1976 


High School Issue 1 . 




3.50% 


$ 150,000 


$ 50,000 


$ 100,000 


$ 50,000 


$ 3,500 


High School Issue 2. 




3.20% 


340,000 


85,000 


255,000 


85,000 


8,160 


South Row School 




3.50% 


345,000 


45,000 


300,000 


45,000 


9,450 


Junior High School 




3.25% 


1 ,075,000 


110,000 


965,000 


110,000 


31 ,363 


Westlands- Harrington 


School 


4.30% 


2,140,000 


160,000 


1 ,980,000 


160,000 


85,140 


Byam School 




6.00% 


1,655,000 


105,000 


1,550,000 


105,000 


89,850 


1972 High School 




4.40% 


7,650,000 


850,000 


6,800,000 


850,000 


280,500 


Highway Garage 


Total 


3.40% 


5,000 


5,000 










13,360,000 


1,410,000 


11,950,000 


1,405,000 


507,963 



TRUST 8 INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Custody of Library Trustees: 

Joseph Warren 
Adams Emerson 
Serlina G. Richardson 
George Fund 

Aaron George (Cemetery) 
Amos F. Adams 
Albert H. Davis 
Thomas P. Proctor 
Nathan B. Edwards 
Victor E. Edwards 
Frederick B. Edwards 
Flint Fund 
Clement Fund 
Frances Clark 
Gertrude Wright 
George W. Barris 



Balances 


New Funds 


Withdrawals 


Balances 


6-30-74 


& Income 




6-30-75 


1,039.37 


55.92 




1 ,095.29 


131.21 


7.05 




138.26 


350.35 


18.84 




369.19 


1,794.56 


96.51 




1,891.07 


1,533.05 


82.50 




1,615.55 


18,100.57 


917.82 




19,018.39 


643.00 


35.13 




678.13 


6,877.56 


355.39 




7,232.95 


823.21 


1,367.81 


1,507.00 


684.02 


1,945.50 


106.34 




2,051.84 


10,880.33 


549.26 


723.06 


10,706.53 


3,110.23 


167.29 




3,277.52 


12.965.58 


901.98 




13,867.56 


953.33 


52.09 




1,005.42 


539.80 


27.32 




567.12 


1,496.64 


1,251.27 


920.00 


1,827.91 



Custody of Town Treasurer 



Stabilization Fund 
Conservation Fund 
Adams Emerson 
Barris Varney Playground 
Barris Memorial 
Barris Fency Fund 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Veterans Emergency Fund 



85,927.40 


23,977.95 


32,116.46 


77,788.89 


58,995.12 


58,485.85 




117,480.97 


488.01 


26.23 




514.24 


1,217.34 


318.42 




1 ,535.76 


3,420.55 


174.98 




3,595.53 


122.04 


6.24 




128.28 


200,430.30 


12,261.07 


10,000.00 


202,691 .37 


6,277.62 


93.12 




6,370.74 



Custody of Selectmen 

Emma Gay Varney Playground 



Custody of Sinking Fund Comm. 
Totals 



372.72 
95,923.28 



18.67 
5,794.56 



391 .39 
101,717.84 



516,358.67 



578,241.76 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Government: 



Moderator $ 


375.00 


300.00 


Selectmen 


47,682.13 


47,767.72 


Accounting 


44,858.43 


35,116.71 


Treasurer & Collector 


130,499.00 


83,565.03 


Assessors 


78,295.35 


57,980.61 


Town Clerk 


43,111.21 


38,348.11 


Public Buildings 


27,598.87 


35,815.78 


Law 


27,258.01 


17,434.58 


Elections 


16,523.46 


13,599.42 


Registrars 


15,931.11 


11,151.50 


Finance Committee 


164.00 


1,413.58 


Planning Board 


16,646.87 


13,887.28 


Board of Appeals 


4,751.50 


3,010.96 


Personnel Board 


385.68 


359.55 


Development & Indust. 






Comm. 


52.35 




Town Forest 


67.15 


40.00 


Conservation Comm. 


7,562.34 


12,786.77 


Historical Commission 


263.37 


747.53 


Constable 


120.00 


144.00 


Home Rule Advisory 






Committee 


579.02 


209.53 


Council on Aging 


9,779.47 


11,864.83 


Council on Aging Van 






Purchase 




5,150.00 


Bus Subsidy 


29,999.88 


25,554.90 


Purchase Land-Tn. Dump 






& Conservation 


22,000.00 


50,000.00 


Youth Center 


12,726.00 


15,667.68 


Total General Government 


537,230.29 


481,916.07 



Public Safety 

Police Department 
Salaries 

Expense & Outlay 
Purchase Cruisers 

Total Police Department 



949,260.08 
81,140.80 
15,966.00 

1,046,366.88 



765,857.05 
70,615.69 
22,942.00 



Public Health 

Salaries 8 Expenses 

Sewer Commission 

Expense 
Engineering Service 

Total Sewer Commission 
Highway Department 

Salaries 

Utilities 

Street Signs 

Materials 

Misc. Equipment 

Machinery Hire 

Waste Collection 

Machinery Repairs 

Snow & Ice 

Construction 

Chapter 90 Maintenances 

Construction 
Sidewalks 

Equipment Purchases 
Maint. of Garage & Radio 
Outlays-Radio 
Clean Up Program 
Engineer Fees 

Total Highway Department 
Street Lighting 

Veterans Benefits: 

Salaries & Expenses 
Cash & Material Grants 

Total Veterans Benefits 
Department 



1973-74 
47,968.79 



1975 
33,252.91 



1,300.22 


513.22 


18,165.70 




19,465.92 


513.22 


362,632.41 


269,945.49 


30,546.57 


29,590.92 


3,181.67 


2,769.86 


62,634.61 


70,512.96 


2,136.09 


1,449.01 


1,476.00 


768.00 


398,367.63 


321,544.24 


29,972.07 


21,476.26 


168,218.71 


144,425.79 


35,930.01 


39,653.01 


27,884.21 


74,720.68 


34.00 


18,547.78 


54,440.10 


35,801.00 


2,234.13 


905.73 


902.16 


942.24 


14,310.08 


9,739.93 


6,480.00 


4,440.00 


1,201,380.45 


1,047,232.90 


73,143.63 


54,929.33 



8,247.95 
122,187.20 



9,695.03 
117,400.80 



Fire Department 

Salaries 

Expense & Outlays 
Purchase Land 
East Station 
Purchase Chiefs Sedan 

Total Fire Department 



Miscellaneous Protection 

Hydrant Service 
Tree Warden 
Building Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Dog Officer 
Animal Inspector 
Sealer of Weights 

& Measures 
Civilian Defense 
Police Outside Detail 

Total Misc. Protection 



975,361.65 
53,102.38 

20,000.00 
2,849.00 

1,051,313.03 



808,629.99 
45,663.37 



73,650.00 


50,860.00 


5,596.80 


10,237.55 


5,569.23 


18,513.56 


4,668.00 


2,968.00 


2,796.00 


1,920.00 


10,196.86 


12,806.44 


1,575.00 


1 ,050.00 


1 ,550.00 


2,077.65 


7,188.97 


6,481.95 




75,226.75 


112,790.86 


182,141.90 



School Committee 


21,162.73 


21,241.94 


Supt. Office 


275,404.63 


195,027.46 


Supervision 


280,771.72 


171,338.48 


Principals 


631,878.30 


587,211.16 


Teachers 


8,726,801.35 


6,596,361.32 


Textbooks 


141,733.03 


121,851.64 


Library 


188,905.98 


213,228.28 


Audio Visuals 


162,947.82 


122,547.46 


Guidance 


400,459.22 


268,737.82 


Psychological Service 


15,712.50 


16,358.50 


School Attendance 


19,162.71 


14,707.60 


Health Service 


99,128.44 


72,225.26 


Transportation 


1,394,707.01 


743,413.55 


Food Service 


66,913.83 


27,007.81 


Athletic Program 


102,299.07 


72,613.34 


Student Activities 


38,820.46 


36,076.27 


Driver Education 


2,161.50 


3,060.00 


Health Education 


62,133.58 


38,742.60 


Custodial 


590,436.13 


525,556.53 


Utilities 


426,607.67 


474,310.33 


Maintenance of Grounds 


20,952.66 


17,533.27 


Maintenance of Buildings 


139,799.74 


35,860.19 


Maintenance of Equipment 


42,473.33 


34,311.44 


Adult Education 


15,681.21 


12,910.31 


Civic Activities 


16,790.17 


19.942.63 


Program w/o Schools 


13,581.80 


9,617.10 


Work Study Programs 


22,555.15 


15,616.52 


Moving 




12,979.35 


Total School Department 


13,919,981.74 


10,480,388.16 



School Revolving Funds: 

Cafeteria 

Athletic 

Public Law 8910-111 

M.E.C. Fund 

Title II 

Total Revolving Funds 



840,146.12 

15,478.65 

230,655.67 

311,329.65 

14,372.89 



568,530.11 

26,899.74 

108,432.78 

306.005.95 

11,970.22 



1,411,982.98 1,021,838.80 



Land Purchase-Warren 
Tennis Courts-So. Row 
Water District 

Consolidation Comm. 
School Traffic Signals 
Police Mutual Aid 

Total Unclassified 



15,000.00 
27,000.00 

11,484.62 

37,309.00 

300.00 



Regional Vocational School 



School Building Committee 



Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Fuel, Lights Water 
Books S Periodicals 
Other Expense 
Outlays 

Special Account 
Library Addition 

Total Libraries 



Parks 

Varney Playground 

Recreation Commission 

Edwards Beach 

Park Dept-New Building 

Total Recreation 



Property S Liability 
Group Insurance 

Total Insurance 



630,749.00 472,869.00 



1,250.14 972.85 



146,194.09 
1,987.13 
7,706.69 
43,417.33 
9,177.57 
5,368.41 



114,430.30 
4,534.86 
8,148.57 

31,399.83 
7,086.40 
1 ,739.88 
9.220.00 

76,630.00 



213,851.22 253,189.84 



22,126.42 
14,661.89 
112,577.72 



25,026.67 

10,116.29 

91,153.33 

499.57 

24.993.30 



149.366.03 151,789.16 



202,882.50 
199,947.35 



124 246.04 
139,237.29 



402,829.85 263,483.33 



Salaries 

Interments 

Labor for Lot Owners 

Repairs, Expense 

& Outlays 
Hot Top Roads 
Restore Old Cemeteries 
Beautification 



Non-Revenue Accounts: 

State & County Share 

Fees & Licenses 
Payroll Deductions 
Retirement-Pension Exp. 
State & County Assessment 
Cemetery Care Bequests 

& Interest 
Tax Levy Refunds 
Performance Bonds 
Trust Funds Invested 
From Misc. Trust Account 

Total Non Revenue Accounts 

Interest: 

Interest- Anticipation 

of Revenue 
Interest-Bonded Debt. 
Interest-Anticipation of 

Bond 

Total Interest 



58,351.76 
5,700.00 
1,473.96 

12,003.18 
4,696.75 
1,218.76 



40,355.04 

4,325.24 

644.40 

9,656.58 

6,950.00 

644.40 

7.103.39 

69,679.05 



12.583.75 10,090.02 

4,107,881.06 3.110,459.93 

264.764.00 240.250.61 

437,340.74 807,648.29 

23.994.96 12,056.56 

153,345.57 86,822.08 

11,490.00 2.710.00 

53,250.00 20,250.00 

14.715.17 5.315.12 

5,079,365.25 4.295,602.61 



108.459.69 
962,314.25 



1,070,773.94 



568.332.50 
11,603.45 



Memorial Day 


2,698.92 


1,500.00 


Town Clock 


318.18 


222.53 


Ambulance Service 


12,333.31 


9.000.00 


Town & Finance Reports 


14,223.55 


6,327.32 


Unpaid Bills-Previous 






Years 


12,512.31 




Regional Drug Program 


28,290.00 


18,860.00 


Celebrations Committee 


4,826.47 


2,993.22 


Crystal Lake Engineering 


37,763.46 


42,905.81 


Mental Health Program 


7,826.23 


5,217.00 


Rev. War Bi-Cent. Comm. 


442.25 


8,061.64 


Liquid Waste Disposal 


64,283.75 


3,519.54 


Charter Commission 


2,049.22 




Police Station Addition 


108,960.01 


42,251.45 


North Chelmsford Water 






Main 


25,000.00 




Site Work-Roberts 






Playground 


23,748.13 


6.732.72 


Re-Construct Crooked 






Spring Dam 


900.00 


17,100.00 


Master Plan Revision 


8,900.00 




C.A.T.V. Committee 




149.31 


Fire Station Bldg. Comm. 




1,432.00 


Update Town History 




800.00 


Merrimack Valley Home 






Center 




1,800.00 


New Library Committee 




1,874.65 


Central Square-Eng. Fees 




10.632.47 



Anticipation of Revenue Loans 
Maturing Debt, 



School Construction 



Total Disbursements 
Cash Balance on Hand 



5,000,000.00 
1,865,000.00 

6,865,000.00 



40 426,447.53 
5.348.827.86 



1,410,000.00 
1.410.000.00 



24,713,436.24 
4 096.992.89 



45.775.275.39 28.810,429.13 



General Revenue: 

Personal Property 

Taxes 
Real Estate Taxes 
Farm Animal Excise 
Motor Vehicle Excise 

Taxes 
Tax Title Redemptions 

Total Taxes 



591,609.49 360,251.04 

15,823,239.52 9,619,652.79 

875.28 76.50 



1,513,325.52 
35,668.00 



1,387,977.23 
14,721.11 



17,964,717.81 11,382,678.67 



PL 74-056 Handicapped ! 


i 1,000.00 




Decennial Census 


7,585.25 




Housing Authority 






Reimbursement 


1,271.75 




EEA Reimbursement 






(Adm) 


10,324.27 


76.69 


Conservation Grant 




11,000.00 



Total Grants 8 Gifts from 
State 



Departmental Receipts 



2,926,237.11 2,818,779.22 



Tax Apportionment 

Basis 
Corporation Tax 
School-Ch 69-70 
Transportation Aid 

Ch 1140 

Total Taxes from 
State 



9,873.40 8,269.00 

33,580.16 37,309.00 

3,436,515.91 3,172,934.94 



3,785,335.47 3,440,303.56 



Selectmen 


7.00 


700.55 


Treasurer 8 Collector 


10,300.00 


2,788.65 


Town Clerk 


1,237.95 


382.10 


Assessors 


117.00 




Police Department 


7,044.03 


9,694.02 


Public Buildings 


4,903.31 


1 ,752.50 


Highway 


23,804.37 


39,057.65 


Dog Officer 


563.00 


366.00 


Tree Warden-Fees 


1,552.50 




Fire Department 




19.50 



Court Fines 
Permits, Fees 
8 Licenses 
Alcoholic Licenses 

Total Fines 8 Permits 



Grants 8 Gifts: 

County 

Dog Licenses 
Chapter 90 Highway 
Funds 

Total Grants 8 Gifts 
From County 

Federal Government 

Under Public Law 874 
Under Public Law 

89-864 Title 1 1 1 
M.E.C. Revolving Fund 
Under Public Law 

89-10 Title 11 

Total Grants 8 Gifts 
From Federal 
Government 

State 

Reimbursement, Con- 
struction Furnishing 8 
Equipping New 
Schools 
Chapter 90 Highway 

Funds 
Aid to Industrial Schools 
Tuition and Trans- 
portation State Wards 
School Aid to Trans- 
portation 
School Cafeteria 
Reimbursement from 
State 
Aid to Public Libraries 
High Way Fund Ch 81 
Lottery Distribution 
Veterans Benefits 



60,659.25 
17,286.00 



9,044.96 
8,913.93 



274,100.00 
324,613.04 



28,248.22 
8,830.00 



13,024.24 
1,136,820.03 



249,257.30 
23,574.00 
144,174.16 
142,462.79 
25,382.00 



54,756.80 
18,143.26 



5,704.05 
9,434.99 



133,873.00 



137,651.98 
259,909.49 



552,594.99 



1,134,283.10 1,117,244.05 



27,608.04 
2,860.00 



12,078.00 
1,164,531.44 



144,696.07 
11,787.00 
71,317.79 

211,023.26 
44,556.88 



Lunch-Cafeteria Cash 

from Sales 
Tuition-Rents 8 Misc. 

Receipts 
Athletic Program 



Library: 

Fines 
Cemetery: 



Sales of Lots and 

Graves 
Interments , Labor, 

Material 8 Use of 

Equipment 

Total Department 
Receipts 



Municipal Indebtedness: 

Temporary Loans 
Anticipation of 
Revenue From Taxes 

Interest and Demands: 

Taxes 
Deposits 

Total from Loans 8 
Interest 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 
Refunds 



566,697.87 



38,194.34 
17,101.47 



701,955.16 



5,000,000.00 



43,272.01 
701,173.80 



5,744,445.81 



53,245.62 
29,459.17 



28,955.21 
15,106.89 



12,315.00 



551,504.49 



17,536.90 
247,907.02 



14,344.24 
20,176.97 



Miscellaneous Receipts, Cont. 1973-4 



Deductions and 






Agency Accounts withhi 


sld from Town 




Employees 






Federal Taxes 


2,260,779.91 


1,708,529.76 


State Taxes 


635,004.23 


503,079.51 


County Retirement 


211,025.89 


168,019.93 


Blue Cross-Blue Shield 






P. i.e. 


210,013.52 


165,115.79 


Group Life Insurance 


9,722.91 


6,993.79 


Teachers Retirement 


475,176.50 


342,105.87 


Tax Sheltered Annuity 


149,259.32 


94,276.57 


Washington National 






Insurance 


22,079.02 


14,502.67 


Teachers Association 






Dues 


52,101.70 


45.536.20 


School Custodian Dues 


3,735.00 


2,948.00 


Highway Department 






Dues 


4,059.00 


2,650.00 


Firefighters Dues 


2,937.55 


2,420.00 


Savings Bonds 


19,158.66 


5,850.78 


Police Department Dues 


3,875.88 


3,366.92 


Fire Department 






Credit Union 


72,536.50 


69,207.00 


United Fund 


1,470.12 


1 ,628.26 


School Credit Union 


20,468.50 


53,957.00 


Tailings 


1.337.64 


12,063.28 


Cemetery-Perpetual 






Care Interest 


1,650.00 


5,871.86 


Cemetery-Perpetual 






Care Bequests 


13,814.64 


10,000.00 


Dog Licenses for County 


12,798.90 


8,493.10 


State Share-Sunday 






Entertainment Licenses 


850.00 


800.00 


Barris Cemetery Fund 


1,250.00 


1,000.00 


Conservation Fund 


520.00 


865.00 


Douglas Cemetery Fund 


3,398.61 


2,985.16 


Registration Fee for 






State 


697.00 


123.00 


Library Trust Funds 


3,940.33 


2,480.00 


Barris Varney Play- 






ground Fund 


250.00 


250.00 


Cash in lieu of Bonds 


9,150.00 


500.00 


Chelms credit Union 




88,842.42 


Police Outside Details 




73,172.62 


Total Deduction and 






Agency Accounts 


4,203,061.39 


3,397,634.49 


Total Receipts 


36,369,620.53 


22,534,351.70 


Cash on Hand July 1st 


8,834,541.61 


5,438,305.68 


Total Receipts and Cash 








on Hand as of July 1 


45,204,162.14 


27,972,657.38 



Non Revenue Account 
Loans in Anticipation of 
Bond Issue 

Total Receipts 



Revenue Sharing Receipts 537,849.00 329,802.00 

Interest Added 33,264.25 7,969.75 

571,113.25 337,771.75 



!)<> 



INDEX 

Appointed Town Officials 3 

Board of Appeals 66 

Board of Assessors 63 

Board of Registrars 81 

Board of Selectmen 6 

Building Inspector 69 

Capital Planning and Budgeting Committee 82 

Celebrations Committee 81 

Cemetery Commission 66 

Civil Defense Commission 60 

Conservation Commission 70 

Council on Aging 73 

Department of Veterans' Services 64 

Dog Officer 70 

D.P.W. Study Committee 67 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Environmental Advisory Council 75 

Fire Department 60 

Fire Station Building Committee - East Chelmsford 61 

Flood Prevention Study Committee 77 

Gas Inspector 70 

General Information 2 

Health Department 62 

Highway Department 61 

Historical Commission 79 

Historic District Commission 80 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 74 

Housing Authority 77 

Insect Pest Control 72 

Inspector of Animals 70 

Insurance Sinking Fund Commission 83 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School - District Committee 57 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 75 

Park Commission 66 

Planning Board 64 

Police Department 58 

Public Libraries 66 

Purchasing Agent 81 

Recreation Commission 67 

Revolutionary War Bicentennial Celebrations Commission 80 

School Building Committee 82 

School Committee 49 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 70 

Sewer Commission 77 

Town Accountant 84 

Town Aide 72 

Town Clerk 8 

Warrant for the Town Election (4-7-75) and Town Meeting May 5, 1975 12 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting May 8, 1975 23 

Results of Annual Town Election held on April 7, 1975 21 

Annual Town Meeting May 5, 1975 action taken on ARTICLES , 4-33, 37-43 23 

Special Town Meeting May 8, 1975 action taken on SPECIAL ARTICLES 1-3 28 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 8, 1975 action on Articles 34-36 & 44-55 29 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 12, 1975 action on Articles 56-60 & 3, 2, & 2A 32 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 19, 1975 action on 2A continued & 3, 57 & 61 34 

Warrant For Special Town Meeting June 16, 1975 40 

Special Town Meeting June 16, 1975 action taken on SPECIAL ARTICLES 1-10 42 

Warrant For Special Town Meeting September 22, 1975 43 

Special Town Meeting September 22, 1975 action taken on SPECIAL ARTICLES 1-6 • • • 45 

Warrant for Special State Primary Prec. 4 & 11 Only Nov. 18, 1975 46 

Results of Special State Primary for Prec. 4 & 11 held on Nov. 18, 1975 47 

Warrant for Special State Election December 16, 1975 Prec. 4 & 11 only 47 

Results of Special State Election held on December 16, 1975 for Prec. 4 & 11 48 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting December 17, 1975 48 

Special Town Meeting December 17, 1975 action taken on Articles 1 & 2 • 48 

91 



INDEX 

Town Forest Committee 72 

Town Planner 82 

Treasurer and Tax Collector 83 

Tree Department 72 

United Nations Day Committee 80 

Vandalism Committee 70 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 65 

Water District Consolidation Committee 79 

Wire Inspector 70 

Youth Center Advisory Committee 68 



BACK COVER Second Place- Eileen J. Cronin, 288 Littleton Road, Chelmsford 



.... K^r-'-y- 



CHEEMSFDRD 










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ANNUAL REPORT